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Intellectual Property: Patents, Trademarks, Copyrights, & Trade Secrets
 
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Intellectual property can be some of the most valuable assets a business can have. In this video, I explain the different types of intellectual property, how they are created, and some of the rights you have to your intellectual property. This video is not legal advice and is not a substitute for legal counsel from a licensed attorney.
Copyrights Trademarks Trade Secrets Patents
 
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Subject:Biotechnology Paper: Environmental Biotechnology
Views: 462 Vidya-mitra
Patents Copyrights and Trade Secrets
 
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wondering what either are? this video may be of some help. produced for a final project at school. informative video for the young.
Views: 8244 TonyFizzle
Difference between patent, copyright, trademark and trade secrets
 
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*Attorney Advertising* DISCLAIMER: The information contained in this video is for general information purposes only. It is not legal advice or a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a licensed attorney and does not create an attorney-client relationship. Law Office of Jason H. Rosenblum, PLLC © 2012 All rights reserved.
Views: 1884 Jason Rosenblum
"Intellectual Property Basics: Understanding Patents, Trademarks, Copyrights and Trade Secrets"
 
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Speaker, author, and attorney Cliff Ennico presents an introduction to the complex world of patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets. Ennico is a nationally recognized expert on the legal, tax and regulatory issues facing entrepreneurs, small businesses, Internet retailers, and startup technology ventures in the United States.
Views: 706 Cliff Ennico
Copyrights, Trademarks, Patents & Trade Secrets: Protecting Your Idea - How To Start A Business
 
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Click here for full course playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7x45KHuu46kNRyey1quSft2GFoz-iJSS Jason Nazar, Founder and CEO of Docstoc, takes on a broad topic that most people over-complicate: starting and running a successful business. He breaks entrepreneurship down into various simple ideas, insights, and self-reflections that will help you get started and follow through with your business. This incredibly comprehensive course will show you how to examine your business idea, pitch to investors, get funding, hire your first employees on a budget, follow in the footsteps of other successful CEOs, court mentors and attract excellent board members, hire an amazing first team, monetize your product, track your revenue, market your product for free, get customers and keep them, and so much more. Start the course, and start your business, today! For more information and resources, be sure to check out http://www.docstoc.com. There you'll have access to an array of valuable tools to help you start and grow a business. And for additional video courses, check out http://www.docstoc.com/courses.
Views: 31470 docstocTV
Trademarks, Patents, Copyrights and Trade Secrets Licensing
 
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In this video, we discuss licensing issues for Trademarks, Patents, Copyrights, and Trade Secrets. This video also covers different types of Trademark Licensing. This lecture will be delivered to you by Mr. Avinash Tripathi. Website: http://www.fusionlawschool.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fusionlawschool/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/FusionLawSchool Google+ : https://plus.google.com/+FusionLawSchool/
Views: 237 Fusion Law School
Patents vs. Trade Secrets
 
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In this episode, we discuss key differences between a trade secret and a patent. We cover different scenarios where each may be appropriate.
Views: 1720 Inventor's Quick Tips
The Four Flavors of Intellectual Property: Patents, Copyright, Trademarks, and Trade Secrets
 
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Bob MacWright, Executive Director - Salk Institute Office of Technology Development
Views: 8109 Salk Institute
Intellectual Property: Trade Secrets
 
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Peter McDermott says if you have a trade secret, there are critical steps you need to take to protect them. THIS VIDEO CAN HELP ANSWER: What is a trade secret? How do you protect them? How do you avoid infringing other people’s trade secrets? ABOUT THE KAUFFMAN FOUNDERS SCHOOL Visit the website: [http://bit.ly/1EW2br7] The Kauffman Founders School presents a powerful curriculum for entrepreneurs who wish to learn anywhere, anytime. The online education platform features experts presenting lectures in series modules designed to give Founders a rich learning experience, while also engaging them in lessons that will make a difference in their business today, tomorrow, and in the future. The Kauffman Founders School series modules include Powerful Presentations, Intellectual Property, Founder's Dilemmas, Entrepreneurial Selling, Entrepreneurial Marketing, Surviving the Entrepreneurial Life, Startups, and much more. © Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. Video may not be used without permission. To enter a request for permission to use, contact [email protected] This video is for educational purposes only. Please consult your lawyer for legal advice suitable to your specific needs.
What is TRADE SECRET? What does TRADE SECRET mean? TRADE SECRET meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is TRADE SECRET? What does TRADE SECRET mean? TRADE SECRET meaning - TRADE SECRET definition - TRADE SECRET explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A trade secret is a formula, practice, process, design, instrument, pattern, commercial method, or compilation of information not generally known or reasonably ascertainable by others by which a business can obtain an economic advantage over competitors or customers. In some jurisdictions, such secrets are referred to as "confidential information" but are generally not referred to as "classified information" in the United States, since that refers to government secrets protected by a different set of laws and practices. The precise language by which a trade secret is defined varies by jurisdiction (as do the particular types of information that are subject to trade secret protection). However, there are three factors that, although subject to differing interpretations, are common to all such definitions: a trade secret is information that: 1. Is not generally known to the public; 2. Confers some sort of economic benefit on its holder (where this benefit must derive specifically from its not being publicly known, not just from the value of the information itself); 3. Is the subject of reasonable efforts to maintain its secrecy. These three aspects are also incorporated in the TRIPS Agreement in Article 39. By comparison, under U.S. law, "A trade secret, as defined under 18 U.S.C. § 1839(3) (A), (B) (1996), has three parts: (1) information; (2) reasonable measures taken to protect the information; and (3) which derives independent economic value from not being publicly known". Trade secrets are an important, but invisible component of a company's intellectual property (IP). Their contribution to a company's value, measured as its market capitalization, can be major. Being invisible, that contribution is hard to measure. Patents are a visible contribution, but delayed, and unsuitable for internal innovations. Having an internal scoreboard provides insight into the cost of risks of employees leaving to serve or start competing ventures. In contrast to registered intellectual property, trade secrets are, by definition, not disclosed to the world at large. Instead, owners of trade secrets seek to protect trade secret information from competitors by instituting special procedures for handling it, as well as technological and legal security measures. Legal protections include non-disclosure agreements (NDAs), and work-for-hire and non-compete clauses. In other words, in exchange for an opportunity to be employed by the holder of secrets, an employee may sign agreements to not reveal their prospective employer's proprietary information, to surrender or assign to their employer ownership rights to intellectual work and work-products produced during the course (or as a condition) of employment, and to not work for a competitor for a given period of time (sometimes within a given geographic region). Violation of the agreement generally carries the possibility of heavy financial penalties which operate as a disincentive to reveal trade secrets. However, proving a breach of an NDA by a former stakeholder who is legally working for a competitor or prevailing in a lawsuit for breaching a non-compete clause can be very difficult. A holder of a trade secret may also require similar agreements from other parties he or she deals with, such as vendors, licensees, and board members. As a company can protect its confidential information through NDA, work-for-hire, and non-compete contracts with its stakeholders (within the constraints of employment law, including only restraint that is reasonable in geographic- and time-scope), these protective contractual measures effectively create a perpetual monopoly on secret information that does not expire as would a patent or copyright. The lack of formal protection associated with registered intellectual property rights, however, means that a third party not bound by a signed agreement is not prevented from independently duplicating and using the secret information once it is discovered, such as through reverse engineering.
Views: 4748 The Audiopedia
Trade Secrets
 
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If you want to learn about Trade Secrets this video provides a brief, yet informative introduction on what Trade Secrets are, why you should protect them, how they can impact a business’s bottom line, and their importance as Intellectual Property. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2mEMvX0. The video was produced by the Global Intellectual Property Academy in conjunction with the Office of Policy and International Affairs Enforcement team.
Views: 8360 USPTOvideo
Pros and Cons of Trade Secrets versus Patents
 
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In this interview with Michael Van Loy, Member in the Intellectual Property Section of the law firm of Mintz Levin, we discuss the pros and cons of using trade secrets versus patents to protect your intellectual property. For more information visit: http://questfusion.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/QuestFusion Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/QuestFusion/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/patrickhenryquestfusion
What is Patent, Copyright & Trademark in Hindi | By Ishan
 
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What is Patent, Copyright & Trademark in Hindi | By Ishan A patent is a right granted to an inventor by the federal government that permits the inventor to exclude others from making, selling or using the invention for a period of time. The patent system is designed to encourage inventions that are unique and useful to society. Congress was given the power to grant patents in the Constitution, and federal statutes and rules govern patents. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) grants patents for inventions that meet statutory criteria. The following provides a general overview of what a patent is. Patent Categories There are three different kinds of patents: utility patents, design patents and plant patents. 1.Utility Patents: The most common type of patent, these are granted to new machines, chemicals, and processes. 2.Design Patents: Granted to protect the unique appearance or design of manufactured objects, such as the surface ornamentation or overall design of the object. 3.Plant Patents: Granted for the invention and asexual reproduction of new and distinct plant varieties, including hybrids (asexual reproduction means the plant is reproduced by means other than from seeds, such as by grafting or rooting of cuttings). Copyright: Copyright is a form of intellectual property protection provided by the laws of the United States. Copyright protection is available for original works of authorship that are fixed in a tangible form, whether published or unpublished. The categories of works that can be protected by copyright laws include paintings, literary works, live performances, photographs, movies, and software. A Copyright Owner's Rights: The primary goal of copyright law is to protect the time, effort, and creativity of the work's creator. As such, the Copyright Act gives the copyright owner certain exclusive rights, including the right to: 1.Reproduce the work 2.Prepare "derivative works" (other works based on the original work) 3.Distribute copies of the work by sale, lease, or other transfer of ownership 4.Perform the work publicly 5.Display the work publicly The copyright owner also has the right to authorize other people to do any of the rights mentioned above. The copyright owner has the option and ability to transfer his or her exclusive rights -- or any subdivision of those rights -- to others as well. The Copyright Office does not have forms for these transfers, so a transfer of copyright is usually done through a contract. It is not legally required for a transfer to be recorded with the Copyright Office, but having a legal record of the transaction is often a good idea. What is a Trademark?: A Trademark generally refers to a “brand” or “logo”. Trademark registration can also be obtained for a business name, distinctive catch phrases, taglines or captions. Properly used and promoted, a Trademark may become the most valuable asset of a business. Trademarks such as Coca Cola, HP, Canon, Nike and Adidas serve as an indication of origin of the goods as well as an indication of quality. It is also essential to obtain trademark registration for the business name/trade name under the Trademarks Act. Registration of a company or business name under the Companies Act does not in itself give protection against others who might commence using identical or similar marks. Disclaimer- Some contents are used for educational purpose under fair use. Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. All credit for copyright materiel used in video goes to respected owner. Keep Supporting Us :- Website : https://www.ishanllb.com/ Website : http://www.eisarahi.com/ Email : [email protected] Facebook Official : https://www.facebook.com/eisarahiofficial Facebook Page : https://www.facebook.com/IshanLLB/ Twitter : https://twitter.com/ishanllb Tags:-What is Patent,Copyright & Trademark in Hindi,what is copyright in hindi,copyright act definition in hindi,copyright act in hindi,copyright act kya h,patent kya hota hai,trademark kya hai,copyright act 1957 in hindi,what is copyright law,patent law in hindi,patent act 1970 in hindi,what is patent in hindi,patent law meaning in hindi,patent ke prakar,what is patent in india,copyright kya hai,patent ka matlab,trademark kya hota hai,ishanllb
Views: 92390 ISHAN LLB
Copyright, Trademark and Patent: What's the Difference?
 
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Find out what rights you already have, what additional rights you get with registration and how quickly you need to act to get any rights at all!
Views: 117242 LegalZoom
Lecture 34: Trade Secrets and Protection
 
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At the end of this video, you will be able to: - Define trade secrets. - Identify the advantages and disadvantages of protecting intellectual property through trade secrets. - Identify the roots of trade secret law in the United States. - Explain the purpose of the Uniform Trade Secrets Act. -------------------------------- Take the full course on Udemy.com: http://buff.ly/2mJVjNS Michelson20mm.org Michelsonip.com *Intellectual Property: Inventors, Entrepreneurs, Creators* A FREE Intellectual Property online course by The Michelson 20MM Foundation & IPO Education Foundation. Take the course on Udemy to develop a working knowledge of the basics of patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets. Brought to you by The Michelson 20MM Foundation & IPO Education Foundation, made possible by the generous support of Alya and Gary Michelson, M.D. -------------------------------- If you have questions or comments please email us at [email protected]
Difference Between Copyright vs. Trademark vs. Patent
 
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This is a preview lesson from my course "Copyright Easily Explained." Enroll in the complete course for FREE for a Limited Time Only here: https://www.udemy.com/copyright What's the Difference between Copyright vs. Trademark vs. Patent? At a fundamental level, Copyright protects your original creative works such as books, movies, songs, paintings, photographs, and web content. As the owner of a copyright, you can control how your work is reproduced, distributed and presented publicly, and you can sue infringers in court. An idea itself cannot be copyrighted. A work must be in a fixed, tangible form to be protected. Copyright registration provides legal evidence and public notice of ownership, and by allowing the copyright owner to bring suit in court if there’s any infringement. Authors, artists, and other creative professionals typically seek copyright protection. On the other hand, Trademark protects the names, symbols or slogans for products or services that you sell. In other words, a trademark lets the consumer tell the difference between one company's product or service from another's. Trademarks include brand names such as "Coca-Cola" and images such as Nike's famous "swoosh." As the owner of a trademark, you can sue for trademark infringement and prevent someone else from using your name, symbol, or slogan. A trademark registration can potentially have an unlimited term, but has be renewed every ten years. The owner can renew the trademark registration as long as the mark remains in continued use. For more information about how to file your own trademark, feel free to enroll in my course, “How to Trademark on Your Own.” Business and product owners typically seek trademark protection. And lastly, patent protects your inventions and designs. There’s two kinds of patent protection — utility patent and design patent. Utility patent protects your inventions with a new or improved function, such as machines, processes, or chemical compositions. On the other hand, design patent protects any new, original, and ornamental design for an article of manufacture that does not affect the article's function. Filing a utility or design patent gives you the exclusive right to prevent others from making, using, selling, or importing the protected invention. If you do not file a patent, then the law doesn’t offer any protection for your invention. A utility patent protects an invention for 20 years and it cannot be renewed. On the other hand, a design patent protects a design for 14 years and it also cannot be renewed. Inventors and designers typically need patent protection. Sign up and find out for yourself why so many people are taking and recommending my courses! Essential Online Business Courses: http://www.mollaeilaw.com/courses Like me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mollaeilaw Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/mollaeilaw Read my blog: http://www.mollaeilaw.com/blog Email: [email protected] Phone: (818) 925-0002 Subscribe to my YouTube channel for more videos to help you start and grow your business: http://www.youtube.com/c/Mollaeilaw ► This is a preview lesson from my course "Copyright Easily Explained" Get the complete course for FREE for a LIMITED time here: https://www.udemy.com/copyright
Views: 32549 Mollaei Law
**Bold Bits** Patents vs. Trade Secrets
 
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Your Patent, Trademark, Copyright and Trade Secret Law Firm, Bold IP, explains what the difference is between a patent and a trade secret! Link to buy "Bold Ideas: The Inventor's Guide to Patents": http://amzn.to/1ScJ5pR Website: www.boldip.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/boldiplaw/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/bold_ip
Should I use trade secret protection or patent protection for my invention?
 
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A question we very often get, particularly with respect to software is should I use patent protection or trade secret protection to protect this software. The kind of gauging question for that really is to figure out, is trade secret protection an option? If the algorithm is going to be discernable or published in any way, trade secret protection is clearly not an option, you can take it off the table. So if it’s going to be published in a paper or the nature of the algorithm is going to be discernable from the input and output of your software, then trade secret protection, you have no way of really maintaining that secrecy of that algorithm. The second gauging function with respect to trade secret protection is you need to have very specific procedures in place within your organization and around that software to keep it secret. If someone does misappropriate your trade secret information, you need to show and produce evidence that you had taken more than reasonable steps to protect that secrecy and very often that requires a company to put very stringent procedures in place and to ensure that access to that software is restricted and the software or the invention is very clearly labeled as trade secret, and often the burden of doing that or actually the practicality of doing that really makes it impossible or makes trade secret protection not a very attractive option. The upside on trade secret protection is that it’s not subject to the limited lifespan that patents are. Patents have a typically 20 year from the date of first filing or priority date life of 20 years. Trade secret protection, if you can keep it secret, it perpetuates and carry on for a very long time. So that’s the upside for trade secret protection. It’s cheaper and it doesn’t have a limited lifespan. Another downside for trade secret protection is it doesn’t protect against copying. You have to prove that someone accessed your trade secret and copied it, whereas patent protection really doesn’t care whether someone actually copied your idea or not or had access to that information. If they bold the product, independently or having seen yours that is within the scope of the patent, you potentially could use your patent against that person, so to that extent, patent protection is a lot more powerful than trade secret protection in that it provides with leverage against even independent development and doesn’t require access and copying.
How do I Legally Protect My Software Product? - HegdeSimplifies
 
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Software could be any set of instructions for a computer, mobile or hand-held, for it to perform a particular function. Many forms of intellectual property laws such as copyright, trademark, patent, and trade secret must be strategically woven together to provide maximum protection and value for a software product. Copyright provides long-term protection and restricts competitors from copying or distributing without authorization. The code, “0s” and “1s”, are considered literary works and are primarily protectable as copyright similar to a fictional or non-fictional book written by an author. Some software can also be patented. Patent protects inventions in the form of a product or process. Pure code however isn’t independently patentable but it being integrated with hardware can make it protectable. The branding of the software, such as any terms or logo that provide identify to and identifiable with the product, are protectable as trademarks. Lastly there are trade secrets, these are business critical or competitive information about the software that you choose not to make public. Trade secrets are not registrable like copyrights, trademarks or patents but rather are protected by contracts putting obligations on the party receiving such information to keep it confidential. Send us your questions to [email protected] Visit us at www.hegdesimplifies.com
Views: 715 Hegde Simplifies
Introduction to Intellectual Property: Crash Course IP 1
 
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This week, Stan Muller launches the Crash Course Intellectual Property mini-series. So, what is intellectual property, and why are we teaching it? Well, intellectual property is about ideas and their ownership, and it's basically about the rights of creators to make money from their work. Intellectual property is so pervasive in today's world, we thought you ought to know a little bit about it. We're going to discuss the three major elements of IP: Copyright, Patents, and Trademarks. ALSO, A DISCLAIMER: he views expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect those of the United States Copyright Office, the Library of Congress, or the United States Government. The information in this video is distributed on "As Is" basis, without warranty. While precaution has been taken in the preparation of the video, the author shall not have any liability to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by any information contained in the work. This video is intended for educational purposes only and is not intended to be, nor should it be construed as, legal advice. Intellectual property law is notoriously fact specific, and this video (or any other single resource) cannot substitute for expert guidance from qualified legal counsel. To obtain legal guidance relevant to your particular circumstances, you should consult a qualified lawyer properly licensed in your jurisdiction. You can contact your local bar association for assistance in finding such a lawyer in your area. The Magic 8 Ball is a registered Trademark of Mattel Citation 1: Brand, Stewart. Quote from speech given at first Hackers' Conference, 1984 Citation 2: Plato, Phaedrus. 390 BC p. 157 Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly (and have your contributions matched by Patreon through April 30th!) by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Suzanne, Dustin & Owen Mets, Amy Fuller, Simon Francis Max Bild-Enkin, Ines Krueger, King of Conquerors Gareth Mok, Chris Ronderos, Gabriella Mayer, jeicorsair, Tokyo Coquette Boutique, Konradical the nonradical TO: Everyone FROM: Bob You CAN'T be 'Based off' of anything! BASED ON! TO: the world FROM: denial Nou Ani Anquietas. Hic Qua Videum. Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 548265 CrashCourse
Intellectual Property Rights In Telugu || Patents || Copyright || TradeMark || Registered
 
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#KOTHA_ABHISHEK My Blog: http://kothaabhishek.blogspot.in/ Music :http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music Programming Tutorials In Telugu by Kotha Abhishek Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Programming-Tutorials-In-Telugu-146323729206321/ Google+ : https://plus.google.com/100152656881619711250 Twitter: https://twitter.com/abhishekkotha LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/abhishek-kotha-0a413b13a Youtube: https://youtube.com/programmingtutorialsintelugu HTML in telugu : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FY-OxURSqlI&list=PLv_sM9ZH4RUWkdiiILVHnNZUsOr2DBS7S CSS in telugu : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DfHdLSN0ZRM&list=PLv_sM9ZH4RUVjmxTl5PysFSxJ6VQbdnRc JavaScript in telugu : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUhkKI1fkrE&list=PLv_sM9ZH4RUW_Pgz-6B0Q-YTfWvC7RVFN ORACLE in telugu : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zk1x48fLUAQ&list=PLv_sM9ZH4RUXedOGLCSx9kSgcE1gSdShN Java in telugu : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uv_tyv0IWGQ&list=PLv_sM9ZH4RUX80_kQBVolY5te0JWF_V38 PHP in Telugu: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xw5qtJwlaro&list=PLv_sM9ZH4RUV9OZcXjU_oJyT63oTkpsUz Python in Telugu: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PI2cpyOGqgk&list=PLv_sM9ZH4RUXF7ARa1ogf8lJpCtgV10eu AngularJS in Telugu: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_LAnEQZwHI&list=PLv_sM9ZH4RUWdXn7yejVgqm2R8zX84V7x C in Telugu: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3ns0tkN55Q&list=PLv_sM9ZH4RUWi0XbsEi22SRLq0j0NP3to XML Tutorials in Telugu https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLv_sM9ZH4RUVVgcym1eWfexIEuXRuTEqJ Materials For Programming Tutorials: http://htmlintelugu1.blogspot.com http://cssintelugu1.blogspot.com http://javascriptintelugu1.blogspot.com http://sqlintelugu1.blogspot.com http://javaintelugu1.blogspot.com
Views: 9926 KOTHA ABHISHEK
Protect Your Trade Secrets
 
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Protect Your Trade Secrets http://www.AscentLawFirm.com #AscentLaw Ascent Law, LLC 8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C West Jordan, Utah 84088 (801) 676-5506 XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX I want to give special thanks to StartoTV for releasing How To Protect Your Intellectual Property & Trade Secrets. Here are some of my other favorite youtubers and their videos! Lecture 34: Trade Secrets and Protection Copyrights, Trademarks, Patents & Trade Secrets: Protecting Your Idea - How To Start A Business Understanding The 4 Types Of Intellectual Property Intellectual Property: Patents, Trademarks, and Copyright Intellectual Property: Trade Secrets How to Protect and Commercialize Intellectual Property - Entrepreneurship 101 2009/10 Trade Secrets Protecting Trade Secrets How to protect your intellectual property | WSGR Startup Basics Common Mistakes New Restaurant Owners Make PROTECTING YOUR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY- Trademarks How To Protect Your Ideas - Patents! How to protect intellectual property of your business or startup Intellectual Property Law - Tutorial 1 - Introduction Overview of Trade Secret Law | 56 of 62 Intro to Patent Law - Jeff Schox // Startup Elements The Four Flavors of Intellectual Property: Patents, Copyright, Trademarks, and Trade Secrets Patents Copyrights and Trade Secrets What are Trade Secrets? The Michelson 20MM Foundation docstocTV docstocTV DardenMBA shaunhailey1 Kauffman FoundersSchool MaRS Entrepreneurship Programs USPTOvideo The Internicola Law Firm, P.C. This Week In Startups RestaurantOwner Howard Cohn Jay Start & Grow Your Business Sarmad Saleh - Reviewsforyoutoo Michigan Engineering Rock Health Salk Institute TonyFizzle Jason Mance Gordon Take a look at StartoTV stats and you'll understand why I am a fan. Video Url: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5t-WOvifb6c Video Title: How To Protect Your Intellectual Property & Trade Secrets Username: StartoTV Subscribers: 356 Views: 4,552 views -------------------------
Views: 338 Ascent Law LLC
Justin Allen - Overview Intellectual Property: Patents, Trademarks, Copyrights and Trade Secrets
 
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Justin Allen, M.S., J.D., Partner, Riverside Law, leads a discussion titled "An Overview of Intellectual Property including Patents, Trademarks, Copyrights and Trade Secrets", during the February 1, 2013 M&M Mars Executive Lecture Series for The Business Department at Elizabethtown College.
Views: 5594 Elizabethtown College
Distinguishing Patents from Trade Secrets
 
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What's the difference between a patent and a trade secret? Both are forms of intellectual property that protect ideas, but they are very different in their subject matter and scope of protection.
Views: 217 kieranpatrick
Length of a Patent Term | IP series 7 of 62
 
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Intellectual Property for Start Ups This series of videos, designed to assist entrepreneurs during their start up period, covers over 60 topics, including patents, copyrights and trademarks. The videos were designed to help guide start-ups through the important basic concepts of intellectual property. About the Professor: Professor Bryce C. Pilz (http://www.law.umich.edu/FacultyBio/P...) is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Law in the Entrepreneurship Clinic (http://www.law.umich.edu/clinical/ent...) at the University of Michigan who represents tech start-ups concerning intellectual property, incorporation, and financing matters. Prior to joining the Law School, Pilz practiced at Kirkland & Ellis LLP in the firm's intellectual property practice and clerked for Judge Amy J. St. Eve in the Northern District of Illinois. Most recently, he served as Associate General Counsel at the University of Michigan, where he worked with the Office of Technology Transfer on start-ups and licensing. Pilz was part of a team that spun-out more than 60 tech start-ups and entered into more than 500 technology licenses over a five-year period. Pilz also assisted in the creation of the University's Venture Accelerator at the North Campus Research Complex and advised the Center for Entrepreneurship on student entrepreneurship matters. Prof. Pilz has also served as a National Science Foundation I-Corps mentor and teaches in the University's Master of Entrepreneurship program. CFE: http://www.cfe.umich.edu/ I-Corps: http://www.cfe.umich.edu/innovation-corps Masters of Entrepreneurship: http://entrepreneurship.umich.edu/ How to use these resource videos: The outline below will help you identify the topic/video most important to you. I. INTRODUCTION 1 • Overview of start-up intellectual property issues 2 • Overview of categories of intellectual property II. PATENTS A. An Overview of Patent Rights 3 • Overview of patent system 4 • Patent remedies and why to patent 5 • Anatomy of a patent 6 • What are patent rights? 7 • Patent term -- How long does a patent last? B. What Can Be Patented? 8 • Patentability and eligibility overview 9 • Patent eligibility -- What inventions are eligible for patent protection 10 • Patentability: Novelty 11 • What is Prior Art 12 • Patentability: Obviousness 13 • Patentability: Written description and enablement 14 • Public Disclosure Issues C. Obtaining a Patent 15 • Patent application process 16 • Provisional patent applications 17 • Selecting a patent attorney 18 • International patent protection 19 • Continuation patents 20 • Invention reporting: mining for inventions D. Patent Inventorship and Ownership 21 • Patent inventorship 22 • Joint inventorship 23 • joint ownership 24 • Patent ownership 25 • Patent licensing 26 • University tech transfer 27 • Past employment issues E. Design Patents 28 • Overview of design patents F. Patent Infringement and Litigation 29 • Enforcing patent rights 30 • Freedom to operate 31 • Claim construction and claim charts 32 • Designing around the patent of another 33 • Defending against patent assertion 34 • Willfulness 35 • Invalidating third party patents 36 • Retaining patent litigation counsel III. COPYRIGHT A. What copyright protects 37 • Copyright Overview 38 • Idea/Expression 39 • Copyright registration 40 • User interface issues 41 • Software: patents v. copyrights B. Copyright ownership 42 • Works for hire 43 • Joint authorship 44 • Authorship compared to patent inventorship C. Avoiding copyright infringement 45 • Fair use 46 • Open source software 47 • Reverse engineering 48 • User generated content and DMCA take downs IV. TRADEMARKS A. Obtaining trademark protection 49 • Trademark overview 50 • Trademark registration 51 • Distinctiveness: selecting a strong name B. Clearing your company or product name 52 • Performing an initial trademark clearance 53 • Likelihood of confusion C. Using trademarks of others 54 • Nominal and fair use 55 • Intermediate trademark uses V. TRADE SECRETS A. Protecting your trade secrets 56 • Overview of trade secrets 57 • Trade secret policies 58 • Enforcing trade secrets 59 • Disclosing secrets under nondisclosure agreements B. Avoiding infringing others' trade secrets 60 • Hiring personnel 61 • Non-compete agreements 62 • Obtaining information pursuant to nondisclosure agreements
Views: 1170 Michigan Engineering
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY in HINDI
 
12:15
Find the notes of INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY on this link - https://viden.io/knowledge/intellectual-property?utm_campaign=creator_campaign&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=youtube&utm_term=ajaze-khan-1
Views: 79401 LearnEveryone
U.S. Intellectual Property Law-Overview of Trade Secrets
 
07:13
IP, overview of trade secrets
Views: 961 Ida M. Jones
Anatomy of a Patent | IP series 5 of 62
 
05:58
Intellectual Property for Start Ups This series of videos, designed to assist entrepreneurs during their start up period, covers over 60 topics, including patents, copyrights and trademarks. The videos were designed to help guide start-ups through the important basic concepts of intellectual property. About the Professor: Professor Bryce C. Pilz (http://www.law.umich.edu/FacultyBio/P...) is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Law in the Entrepreneurship Clinic (http://www.law.umich.edu/clinical/ent...) at the University of Michigan who represents tech start-ups concerning intellectual property, incorporation, and financing matters. Prior to joining the Law School, Pilz practiced at Kirkland & Ellis LLP in the firm's intellectual property practice and clerked for Judge Amy J. St. Eve in the Northern District of Illinois. Most recently, he served as Associate General Counsel at the University of Michigan, where he worked with the Office of Technology Transfer on start-ups and licensing. Pilz was part of a team that spun-out more than 60 tech start-ups and entered into more than 500 technology licenses over a five-year period. Pilz also assisted in the creation of the University's Venture Accelerator at the North Campus Research Complex and advised the Center for Entrepreneurship on student entrepreneurship matters. Prof. Pilz has also served as a National Science Foundation I-Corps mentor and teaches in the University's Master of Entrepreneurship program. CFE: http://www.cfe.umich.edu/ I-Corps: http://www.cfe.umich.edu/innovation-corps Masters of Entrepreneurship: http://entrepreneurship.umich.edu/ How to use these resource videos: The outline below will help you identify the topic/video most important to you. I. INTRODUCTION 1 • Overview of start-up intellectual property issues 2 • Overview of categories of intellectual property II. PATENTS A. An Overview of Patent Rights 3 • Overview of patent system 4 • Patent remedies and why to patent 5 • Anatomy of a patent 6 • What are patent rights? 7 • Patent term -- How long does a patent last? B. What Can Be Patented? 8 • Patentability and eligibility overview 9 • Patent eligibility -- What inventions are eligible for patent protection 10 • Patentability: Novelty 11 • What is Prior Art 12 • Patentability: Obviousness 13 • Patentability: Written description and enablement 14 • Public Disclosure Issues C. Obtaining a Patent 15 • Patent application process 16 • Provisional patent applications 17 • Selecting a patent attorney 18 • International patent protection 19 • Continuation patents 20 • Invention reporting: mining for inventions D. Patent Inventorship and Ownership 21 • Patent inventorship 22 • Joint inventorship 23 • joint ownership 24 • Patent ownership 25 • Patent licensing 26 • University tech transfer 27 • Past employment issues E. Design Patents 28 • Overview of design patents F. Patent Infringement and Litigation 29 • Enforcing patent rights 30 • Freedom to operate 31 • Claim construction and claim charts 32 • Designing around the patent of another 33 • Defending against patent assertion 34 • Willfulness 35 • Invalidating third party patents 36 • Retaining patent litigation counsel III. COPYRIGHT A. What copyright protects 37 • Copyright Overview 38 • Idea/Expression 39 • Copyright registration 40 • User interface issues 41 • Software: patents v. copyrights B. Copyright ownership 42 • Works for hire 43 • Joint authorship 44 • Authorship compared to patent inventorship C. Avoiding copyright infringement 45 • Fair use 46 • Open source software 47 • Reverse engineering 48 • User generated content and DMCA take downs IV. TRADEMARKS A. Obtaining trademark protection 49 • Trademark overview 50 • Trademark registration 51 • Distinctiveness: selecting a strong name B. Clearing your company or product name 52 • Performing an initial trademark clearance 53 • Likelihood of confusion C. Using trademarks of others 54 • Nominal and fair use 55 • Intermediate trademark uses V. TRADE SECRETS A. Protecting your trade secrets 56 • Overview of trade secrets 57 • Trade secret policies 58 • Enforcing trade secrets 59 • Disclosing secrets under nondisclosure agreements B. Avoiding infringing others' trade secrets 60 • Hiring personnel 61 • Non-compete agreements 62 • Obtaining information pursuant to nondisclosure agreements
Views: 1791 Michigan Engineering
Overview of the Patent System | IP series 3 of 62
 
04:09
Intellectual Property for Start Ups This series of videos, designed to assist entrepreneurs during their start up period, covers over 60 topics, including patents, copyrights and trademarks. The videos were designed to help guide start-ups through the important basic concepts of intellectual property. About the Professor: Professor Bryce C. Pilz (http://www.law.umich.edu/FacultyBio/P...) is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Law in the Entrepreneurship Clinic (http://www.law.umich.edu/clinical/ent...) at the University of Michigan who represents tech start-ups concerning intellectual property, incorporation, and financing matters. Prior to joining the Law School, Pilz practiced at Kirkland & Ellis LLP in the firm's intellectual property practice and clerked for Judge Amy J. St. Eve in the Northern District of Illinois. Most recently, he served as Associate General Counsel at the University of Michigan, where he worked with the Office of Technology Transfer on start-ups and licensing. Pilz was part of a team that spun-out more than 60 tech start-ups and entered into more than 500 technology licenses over a five-year period. Pilz also assisted in the creation of the University's Venture Accelerator at the North Campus Research Complex and advised the Center for Entrepreneurship on student entrepreneurship matters. Prof. Pilz has also served as a National Science Foundation I-Corps mentor and teaches in the University's Master of Entrepreneurship program. CFE: http://www.cfe.umich.edu/ I-Corps: http://www.cfe.umich.edu/innovation-corps Masters of Entrepreneurship: http://entrepreneurship.umich.edu/ How to use these resource videos: The outline below will help you identify the topic/video most important to you. I. INTRODUCTION 1 • Overview of start-up intellectual property issues 2 • Overview of categories of intellectual property II. PATENTS A. An Overview of Patent Rights 3 • Overview of patent system 4 • Patent remedies and why to patent 5 • Anatomy of a patent 6 • What are patent rights? 7 • Patent term -- How long does a patent last? B. What Can Be Patented? 8 • Patentability and eligibility overview 9 • Patent eligibility -- What inventions are eligible for patent protection 10 • Patentability: Novelty 11 • What is Prior Art 12 • Patentability: Obviousness 13 • Patentability: Written description and enablement 14 • Public Disclosure Issues C. Obtaining a Patent 15 • Patent application process 16 • Provisional patent applications 17 • Selecting a patent attorney 18 • International patent protection 19 • Continuation patents 20 • Invention reporting: mining for inventions D. Patent Inventorship and Ownership 21 • Patent inventorship 22 • Joint inventorship 23 • joint ownership 24 • Patent ownership 25 • Patent licensing 26 • University tech transfer 27 • Past employment issues E. Design Patents 28 • Overview of design patents F. Patent Infringement and Litigation 29 • Enforcing patent rights 30 • Freedom to operate 31 • Claim construction and claim charts 32 • Designing around the patent of another 33 • Defending against patent assertion 34 • Willfulness 35 • Invalidating third party patents 36 • Retaining patent litigation counsel III. COPYRIGHT A. What copyright protects 37 • Copyright Overview 38 • Idea/Expression 39 • Copyright registration 40 • User interface issues 41 • Software: patents v. copyrights B. Copyright ownership 42 • Works for hire 43 • Joint authorship 44 • Authorship compared to patent inventorship C. Avoiding copyright infringement 45 • Fair use 46 • Open source software 47 • Reverse engineering 48 • User generated content and DMCA take downs IV. TRADEMARKS A. Obtaining trademark protection 49 • Trademark overview 50 • Trademark registration 51 • Distinctiveness: selecting a strong name B. Clearing your company or product name 52 • Performing an initial trademark clearance 53 • Likelihood of confusion C. Using trademarks of others 54 • Nominal and fair use 55 • Intermediate trademark uses V. TRADE SECRETS A. Protecting your trade secrets 56 • Overview of trade secrets 57 • Trade secret policies 58 • Enforcing trade secrets 59 • Disclosing secrets under nondisclosure agreements B. Avoiding infringing others' trade secrets 60 • Hiring personnel 61 • Non-compete agreements 62 • Obtaining information pursuant to nondisclosure agreements
Views: 2943 Michigan Engineering
Should I get a patent or keep my idea a trade secret? | Intellectual Property Attorney Phoenix
 
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http://thelutherlawfirm.com/faqs/ Should I get a patent or keep my idea a trade secret? Well, sometimes you can't keep your idea a trade secret because when you sell it somebody could reverse engineer it -- so a patent would make more sense. Also, it might make sense to patent portions of your idea and keep other portions a trade secret.
Views: 379 Barbara Luther
Trade secret Meaning
 
01:01
Video shows what trade secret means. A formula, practice, process, design, instrument, pattern, or compilation of information used by a business to obtain an advantage over competitors within the same industry or profession.. A formula, practice, device, idea, process, design, instrument, pattern, or compilation of information which is not patented and which is used by the owner to obtain an advantage over competitor within the marketplace and is treated in a way that can reasonably be expected to prevent the public or competitors from learning about it except when there is improper access, eavesdropping, data acquisition or theft (where the country's law recognises theft) of that trade secret and where the implementation of the trade secret does not allow reverse engineering.. Trade secret Meaning. How to pronounce, definition audio dictionary. How to say trade secret. Powered by MaryTTS, Wiktionary
Views: 335 ADictionary
Software Trade Secrets Defined
 
03:52
Buy The Software IP Detective's Handbook: Measurement, Comparison, and Infringement Detection: http://www.informit.com/store/product.aspx?isbn=0137035330 The Software IP Detective's Handbook author, Bob Zeidman, discusses software trade secrets, the steps needed to protect them, and how trade secret protection differs from patent protection.
Views: 155 OnSoftware
Trillion Dollar Rip-Off: Social Networking is a Stolen Trade Secret
 
43:53
Here is the full interview series: https://aim4truth.org/2017/11/21/facebook-unmasked-how-the-worlds-most-relevant-entrepreneur-was-screwed-by-zuckerberg/ Douglas Gabriel interviews Michael McKibben in PART 1 of SIX interviews. One of the largest government sponsored industrial espionage thefts of copyrights, trade secrets, and patents in modern times was the theft of scalable social networking inventions. The technology and programming code that underlie Facebook, Gmail, YouTube, Twitter, Instagram and most the other large-scale social networking companies runs on Leader Technologies’ intellectual property. It was stolen by a group of criminal lawyers, judges, spies and bankers working with complete impunity and in total disregard for the law. Under the guise of the IBM Eclipse Foundation, James P. Chandler III (who was a national security advisor and top White House attorney) led the group of criminals who, interestingly enough, are also appearing in the news currently due to their most recently discovered crimes, along with John Podesta, Robert Mueller, Rod Rosenstein, John Breyer, James Breyer, Larry Summers, Yuri Milner, Alisher Usmanov, Mark Zuckerberg, Sheryl Sandberg, Bill and Hillary Clinton, and a host of others who are not so well known. Notices: Unless marked otherwise, American Intelligence Media (AIM), Aim4Truth.org, copyright claims are waived. Reproduction is permitted with or without attribution. This content and its links may contain opinion. As with all opinion, it should not be relied upon without independent verification. Think for yourself. Fair Use is relied upon for all content. For educational purposes only. No claims are made to the properties of third parties.
Brilliant Protection - Patents, Trade Secrets and Digital Rights For The New Environment Pt. 3
 
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#TrendPOV #Tip - Combine patents and trade secrets for greater IP protection with agility http://bit.ly/fEDi03
Views: 175 Dr. Amy Messegee
Intellectual property Understanding Patent, copyright and trademark
 
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If an idea stays in your head, it is just an idea. If you convert an idea into a song, a product, a design or a book then it becomes intellectual property. Now the idea has value and may need protecting. Protection can come in the form of a patent, copyright or trade mark. This protection is an incentive to firms to go on and produce the product. Patents protect the working parts of a product, what they do, how they do it, what they are made of and how they are made. A patent gives inventors control over their invention for twenty years. This can stop other would be manufacturers from making a similar product using their ideas. A patent gives firms a competitive advantage, they can establish their product in the market without any competition and charge higher prices which helps to recover their research costs. They could also sell the rights to the invention, or licence the invention to another manufacturer. Copyright laws protect the image of the product. The reason a business would want to protect images of their product is to ensure they are only used in situations that benefit the product and brand. Finally the name and company logo are protected by trademark. This is done by registering the product name or symbol with the intellectual property office. Business names and logos are valuable trademarks because they are a sign which distinguishes a firms products from its competitors.
Views: 6182 Gary Wainwright
Lecture 4: Patent Law & Litigation
 
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At the end of this video, you will be able to: - Describe the differences between U.S. and European patent laws. - Describe the history of patent litigation in the United States. -------------------------------- Take the full course on Udemy.com: http://buff.ly/2mJVjNS Michelson20mm.org Michelsonip.com *Intellectual Property: Inventors, Entrepreneurs, Creators* A FREE Intellectual Property online course by The Michelson 20MM Foundation & IPO Education Foundation. Take the course on Udemy to develop a working knowledge of the basics of patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets. Brought to you by The Michelson 20MM Foundation & IPO Education Foundation, made possible by the generous support of Alya and Gary Michelson, M.D. -------------------------------- If you have questions or comments please email us at [email protected]
Brilliant Protection - Patents, Trade Secrets and Digital Rights For The New Environment Pt. 2
 
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#TrendPOV #Tip - Protect your IP with trade secrets when you cannot wait for patents http://bit.ly/fEDi03
Views: 228 Dr. Amy Messegee
Patent Inventorship | IP series 21 of 62
 
04:32
Intellectual Property for Start Ups This series of videos, designed to assist entrepreneurs during their start up period, covers over 60 topics, including patents, copyrights and trademarks. The videos were designed to help guide startups through the important basic concepts of intellectual property. About the Professor: Professor Bryce C. Pilz (http://www.law.umich.edu/FacultyBio/Pages/FacultyBio.aspx?FacID=bpilz) is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Law in the Entrepreneurship Clinic (http://www.law.umich.edu/clinical/entrepreneurshipclinic/Pages/default.aspx) at the University of Michigan represents tech startups concerning intellectual property, incorporation, and financing matters. Prior to joining the Law School, Pilz practiced at Kirkland & Ellis LLP in the firm's intellectual property practice and clerked for Judge Amy J. St. Eve in the Northern District of Illinois. Most recently, he served as Associate General Counsel at the University of Michigan, where he worked with the Office of Technology Transfer on startups and licensing. Pilz was part of a team that spun-out more than 60 tech startups and entered into more than 500 technology licenses over a five-year period. Pilz also assisted in the creation of the University's Venture Accelerator at the North Campus Research Complex and advised the Center for Entrepreneurship on student entrepreneurship matters. Prof. Pilz has also served as a National Science Foundation I-Corps mentor and teaches in the University's Master of Entrepreneurship program. How to use this: The outline below will help you identify the topic/video most important to you. I. Introduction 1 • Overview of startup intellectual property issues 2 • Overview of categories of intellectual property II. Patents A. An Overview of Patent Rights 3 • Overview of patent system 4 • Patent remedies and why to patent 5 • Anatomy of a patent 6 • What are patent rights? 7 • Patent term -- How long does a patent last? B. What Can Be Patented 8 • Patentability and eligibility overview 9 • Patent eligibility -- What inventions are eligible for patent protection 10 • Patentability: Novelty 11 • What is Prior Art 12 • Patentability: Obviousness 13 • Patentability: Written description and enablement 14 • Public Disclosure Issues C. Obtaining a Patent 15 • Patent application process 16 • Provisional patent applications 17 • Selecting a patent attorney 18 • International patent protection 19 • Continuation patents 20 • Invention reporting: mining for inventions D. Patent Inventorship and Ownership 21 • Patent inventorship 22 • Joint inventorship 23 • joint ownership 24 • Patent ownership 25 • Patent licensing 26 • University tech transfer 27 • Past employment issues E. Design Patents 28 • Overview of design patents F. Patent Infringement and Litigation 29 • Enforcing patent rights 30 • Freedom to operate 31 • Claim construction and claim charts 32 • Desiging around the patent of another 33 • Defending against patent assertion 34 • Willfulness 35 • Invalidating third party patents 36 • Retaining patent litigation counsel III. Copyright A. What copyright protects 37 • Copyright Overview 38 • Idea/Expression 39 • Copyright registration 40 • User interface issues 41 • Software: patents v. copyrights B. Copyright ownership 42 • Works for hire 43 • Joint authorship 44 • Authorship compared to patent inventorship C. Avoiding copyright infringement 45 • Fair use 46 • Open source software 47 • Reverse engineering 48 • User generated content and DMCA take downs IV. Trademarks A. Obtaining trademark protection 49 • Trademark overview 50 • Trademark registration 51 • Distinctiveness: selecting a strong name B. Clearing your company or product name 52 • Performing an initial trademark clearance 53 • Likelihood of confusion C. Using trademarks of others 54 • Nominal and fair use 55 • Intermediate trademark uses V. Trade Secrets A. Protecting your trade secrets X 56 • Overview of trade secrets X 57 • Trade secret policies 58 • Enforcing trade secrets 59 • Disclosing secrets under nondisclosure agreements B. Avoiding infringing others' trade secrets 60 • Hiring personnel 61 • Noncompete agreements 62 • Obtaining information pursuant to nondisclosure agreements Tags: University of Michigan, Michigan Engineering, Center for Entrepreneurship, Intellectual property, patents, copyright, trademarks, startups, start up, starting a business, getting a patent, patent basics, startup basics, copyright basics, how to get a copyright, what is a trademark, trademark basics, Bryce pilz, professor pilz, cfe, ross, ross school of business, umich, um, u-m, alumni, Michigan alumni, business alumni, engineering alumni
Views: 1476 Michigan Engineering
Training: Strategy for the Protection of Patents and Trade Secrets in China - Italian
 
18:46
Join the Italian Embassy to China, the Centro per il Trasferimento Tecnologico Italia Cina and the China IPR SME Helpdesk for this joint session which took place on November 14 2017. This training was hosted by Mr. Elio de Tullio titled "Strategy for the Protection of Patents and Trade Secrets in China, Starting from Italian and European rights" and is given in Italian.
Views: 46 Helpdesk TV

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