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Intellectual Property: Patents, Trademarks, Copyrights, & Trade Secrets
 
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Intellectual property can be some of the most valuable assets a business can have. In this video, I explain the different types of intellectual property, how they are created, and some of the rights you have to your intellectual property. This video is not legal advice and is not a substitute for legal counsel from a licensed attorney.
Patents Copyrights and Trade Secrets
 
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wondering what either are? this video may be of some help. produced for a final project at school. informative video for the young.
Views: 7957 TonyFizzle
Copyrights Trademarks Trade Secrets Patents
 
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Subject:Biotechnology Paper: Environmental Biotechnology
Views: 248 Vidya-mitra
Difference between patent, copyright, trademark and trade secrets
 
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*Attorney Advertising* DISCLAIMER: The information contained in this video is for general information purposes only. It is not legal advice or a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a licensed attorney and does not create an attorney-client relationship. Law Office of Jason H. Rosenblum, PLLC © 2012 All rights reserved.
Views: 1833 Jason Rosenblum
Copyrights, Trademarks, Patents & Trade Secrets: Protecting Your Idea - How To Start A Business
 
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Click here for full course playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7x45KHuu46kNRyey1quSft2GFoz-iJSS Jason Nazar, Founder and CEO of Docstoc, takes on a broad topic that most people over-complicate: starting and running a successful business. He breaks entrepreneurship down into various simple ideas, insights, and self-reflections that will help you get started and follow through with your business. This incredibly comprehensive course will show you how to examine your business idea, pitch to investors, get funding, hire your first employees on a budget, follow in the footsteps of other successful CEOs, court mentors and attract excellent board members, hire an amazing first team, monetize your product, track your revenue, market your product for free, get customers and keep them, and so much more. Start the course, and start your business, today! For more information and resources, be sure to check out http://www.docstoc.com. There you'll have access to an array of valuable tools to help you start and grow a business. And for additional video courses, check out http://www.docstoc.com/courses.
Views: 29951 docstocTV
Trademarks, Patents, Copyrights and Trade Secrets Licensing
 
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In this video, we discuss licensing issues for Trademarks, Patents, Copyrights, and Trade Secrets. This video also covers different types of Trademark Licensing. This lecture will be delivered to you by Mr. Avinash Tripathi. Website: http://www.fusionlawschool.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fusionlawschool/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/FusionLawSchool Google+ : https://plus.google.com/+FusionLawSchool/
Views: 189 Fusion Law School
"Intellectual Property Basics: Understanding Patents, Trademarks, Copyrights and Trade Secrets"
 
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Speaker, author, and attorney Cliff Ennico presents an introduction to the complex world of patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets. Ennico is a nationally recognized expert on the legal, tax and regulatory issues facing entrepreneurs, small businesses, Internet retailers, and startup technology ventures in the United States.
Views: 507 Cliff Ennico
The Four Flavors of Intellectual Property: Patents, Copyright, Trademarks, and Trade Secrets
 
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Bob MacWright, Executive Director - Salk Institute Office of Technology Development
Views: 8080 Salk Institute
Patents vs. Trade Secrets
 
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In this episode, we discuss key differences between a trade secret and a patent. We cover different scenarios where each may be appropriate.
Views: 1486 Inventor's Quick Tips
Copyright, Trademark and Patent: What's the Difference?
 
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Find out what rights you already have, what additional rights you get with registration and how quickly you need to act to get any rights at all!
Views: 111253 LegalZoom
Justin Allen - Overview Intellectual Property: Patents, Trademarks, Copyrights and Trade Secrets
 
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Justin Allen, M.S., J.D., Partner, Riverside Law, leads a discussion titled "An Overview of Intellectual Property including Patents, Trademarks, Copyrights and Trade Secrets", during the February 1, 2013 M&M Mars Executive Lecture Series for The Business Department at Elizabethtown College.
Views: 5581 Elizabethtown College
What is TRADE SECRET? What does TRADE SECRET mean? TRADE SECRET meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is TRADE SECRET? What does TRADE SECRET mean? TRADE SECRET meaning - TRADE SECRET definition - TRADE SECRET explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A trade secret is a formula, practice, process, design, instrument, pattern, commercial method, or compilation of information not generally known or reasonably ascertainable by others by which a business can obtain an economic advantage over competitors or customers. In some jurisdictions, such secrets are referred to as "confidential information" but are generally not referred to as "classified information" in the United States, since that refers to government secrets protected by a different set of laws and practices. The precise language by which a trade secret is defined varies by jurisdiction (as do the particular types of information that are subject to trade secret protection). However, there are three factors that, although subject to differing interpretations, are common to all such definitions: a trade secret is information that: 1. Is not generally known to the public; 2. Confers some sort of economic benefit on its holder (where this benefit must derive specifically from its not being publicly known, not just from the value of the information itself); 3. Is the subject of reasonable efforts to maintain its secrecy. These three aspects are also incorporated in the TRIPS Agreement in Article 39. By comparison, under U.S. law, "A trade secret, as defined under 18 U.S.C. § 1839(3) (A), (B) (1996), has three parts: (1) information; (2) reasonable measures taken to protect the information; and (3) which derives independent economic value from not being publicly known". Trade secrets are an important, but invisible component of a company's intellectual property (IP). Their contribution to a company's value, measured as its market capitalization, can be major. Being invisible, that contribution is hard to measure. Patents are a visible contribution, but delayed, and unsuitable for internal innovations. Having an internal scoreboard provides insight into the cost of risks of employees leaving to serve or start competing ventures. In contrast to registered intellectual property, trade secrets are, by definition, not disclosed to the world at large. Instead, owners of trade secrets seek to protect trade secret information from competitors by instituting special procedures for handling it, as well as technological and legal security measures. Legal protections include non-disclosure agreements (NDAs), and work-for-hire and non-compete clauses. In other words, in exchange for an opportunity to be employed by the holder of secrets, an employee may sign agreements to not reveal their prospective employer's proprietary information, to surrender or assign to their employer ownership rights to intellectual work and work-products produced during the course (or as a condition) of employment, and to not work for a competitor for a given period of time (sometimes within a given geographic region). Violation of the agreement generally carries the possibility of heavy financial penalties which operate as a disincentive to reveal trade secrets. However, proving a breach of an NDA by a former stakeholder who is legally working for a competitor or prevailing in a lawsuit for breaching a non-compete clause can be very difficult. A holder of a trade secret may also require similar agreements from other parties he or she deals with, such as vendors, licensees, and board members. As a company can protect its confidential information through NDA, work-for-hire, and non-compete contracts with its stakeholders (within the constraints of employment law, including only restraint that is reasonable in geographic- and time-scope), these protective contractual measures effectively create a perpetual monopoly on secret information that does not expire as would a patent or copyright. The lack of formal protection associated with registered intellectual property rights, however, means that a third party not bound by a signed agreement is not prevented from independently duplicating and using the secret information once it is discovered, such as through reverse engineering.
Views: 3769 The Audiopedia
Should I use trade secret protection or patent protection for my invention?
 
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A question we very often get, particularly with respect to software is should I use patent protection or trade secret protection to protect this software. The kind of gauging question for that really is to figure out, is trade secret protection an option? If the algorithm is going to be discernable or published in any way, trade secret protection is clearly not an option, you can take it off the table. So if it’s going to be published in a paper or the nature of the algorithm is going to be discernable from the input and output of your software, then trade secret protection, you have no way of really maintaining that secrecy of that algorithm. The second gauging function with respect to trade secret protection is you need to have very specific procedures in place within your organization and around that software to keep it secret. If someone does misappropriate your trade secret information, you need to show and produce evidence that you had taken more than reasonable steps to protect that secrecy and very often that requires a company to put very stringent procedures in place and to ensure that access to that software is restricted and the software or the invention is very clearly labeled as trade secret, and often the burden of doing that or actually the practicality of doing that really makes it impossible or makes trade secret protection not a very attractive option. The upside on trade secret protection is that it’s not subject to the limited lifespan that patents are. Patents have a typically 20 year from the date of first filing or priority date life of 20 years. Trade secret protection, if you can keep it secret, it perpetuates and carry on for a very long time. So that’s the upside for trade secret protection. It’s cheaper and it doesn’t have a limited lifespan. Another downside for trade secret protection is it doesn’t protect against copying. You have to prove that someone accessed your trade secret and copied it, whereas patent protection really doesn’t care whether someone actually copied your idea or not or had access to that information. If they bold the product, independently or having seen yours that is within the scope of the patent, you potentially could use your patent against that person, so to that extent, patent protection is a lot more powerful than trade secret protection in that it provides with leverage against even independent development and doesn’t require access and copying.
What's the Copyright vs. Trademark vs. Patent?
 
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Lecture 34: Trade Secrets and Protection
 
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At the end of this video, you will be able to: - Define trade secrets. - Identify the advantages and disadvantages of protecting intellectual property through trade secrets. - Identify the roots of trade secret law in the United States. - Explain the purpose of the Uniform Trade Secrets Act. -------------------------------- Take the full course on Udemy.com: http://buff.ly/2mJVjNS Michelson20mm.org Michelsonip.com *Intellectual Property: Inventors, Entrepreneurs, Creators* A FREE Intellectual Property online course by The Michelson 20MM Foundation & IPO Education Foundation. Take the course on Udemy to develop a working knowledge of the basics of patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets. Brought to you by The Michelson 20MM Foundation & IPO Education Foundation, made possible by the generous support of Alya and Gary Michelson, M.D. -------------------------------- If you have questions or comments please email us at [email protected]
Difference Between Copyright vs. Trademark vs. Patent
 
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This is a preview lesson from my course "Copyright Easily Explained." Enroll in the complete course for FREE for a Limited Time Only here: https://www.udemy.com/copyright What's the Difference between Copyright vs. Trademark vs. Patent? At a fundamental level, Copyright protects your original creative works such as books, movies, songs, paintings, photographs, and web content. As the owner of a copyright, you can control how your work is reproduced, distributed and presented publicly, and you can sue infringers in court. An idea itself cannot be copyrighted. A work must be in a fixed, tangible form to be protected. Copyright registration provides legal evidence and public notice of ownership, and by allowing the copyright owner to bring suit in court if there’s any infringement. Authors, artists, and other creative professionals typically seek copyright protection. On the other hand, Trademark protects the names, symbols or slogans for products or services that you sell. In other words, a trademark lets the consumer tell the difference between one company's product or service from another's. Trademarks include brand names such as "Coca-Cola" and images such as Nike's famous "swoosh." As the owner of a trademark, you can sue for trademark infringement and prevent someone else from using your name, symbol, or slogan. A trademark registration can potentially have an unlimited term, but has be renewed every ten years. The owner can renew the trademark registration as long as the mark remains in continued use. For more information about how to file your own trademark, feel free to enroll in my course, “How to Trademark on Your Own.” Business and product owners typically seek trademark protection. And lastly, patent protects your inventions and designs. There’s two kinds of patent protection — utility patent and design patent. Utility patent protects your inventions with a new or improved function, such as machines, processes, or chemical compositions. On the other hand, design patent protects any new, original, and ornamental design for an article of manufacture that does not affect the article's function. Filing a utility or design patent gives you the exclusive right to prevent others from making, using, selling, or importing the protected invention. If you do not file a patent, then the law doesn’t offer any protection for your invention. A utility patent protects an invention for 20 years and it cannot be renewed. On the other hand, a design patent protects a design for 14 years and it also cannot be renewed. Inventors and designers typically need patent protection. Sign up and find out for yourself why so many people are taking and recommending my courses! Essential Online Business Courses: http://www.mollaeilaw.com/courses Like me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mollaeilaw Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/mollaeilaw Read my blog: http://www.mollaeilaw.com/blog Email: [email protected] Phone: (818) 925-0002 Subscribe to my YouTube channel for more videos to help you start and grow your business: http://www.youtube.com/c/Mollaeilaw ► This is a preview lesson from my course "Copyright Easily Explained" Get the complete course for FREE for a LIMITED time here: https://www.udemy.com/copyright
Views: 30113 Mollaei Law
All About AIPLA IP law, copyright, trademark, patent, trade secrets, CLE
 
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All about AIPLA, IP law, copyright, trademark, patent, trade secrets, CLE
Views: 37 AIPLA TV
**Bold Bits** Patents vs. Trade Secrets
 
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Your Patent, Trademark, Copyright and Trade Secret Law Firm, Bold IP, explains what the difference is between a patent and a trade secret! Link to buy "Bold Ideas: The Inventor's Guide to Patents": http://amzn.to/1ScJ5pR Website: www.boldip.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/boldiplaw/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/bold_ip
The Trade Secrets Secrets of Intellectual Property: - What is Copyright Infringement
 
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An interview by Dan Kennedy with Seattle attorney Timothy B. McCormack, founder of McCormack Intellectual Property Law PS The "Don't Copy This* (aka "The Trade Secrets of Intellectual Property" Online Book & Video Series is an online Creative Commons law online book and video series by attorney Timothy B. McCormack, the founder of Seattle based Intellectual Property Law Firm, McCormack Intellectual Property Law PS. The Trade Secrets of Intellectual Property or Don't Copy This* online book series is divided into chapters that will be fully published as a book when done. Intellectual properties are one of these issues that touch everybody. This series is designed to help bring light to what law is and how it works. Dan Kennedy: Why should people care about copyrights? Timothy B. McCormack: Copyrights are important because they help to drive the economy. They help to incentivize artist and photographers. Some of them risk their lives to bring us images from the war zone or document human right atrocities. Look at the founding fathers, wrote copyrights into the Constitution itself. Today Intellectual Property is the state's second largest export. Copyrights are a really big deal. Dan Kennedy: Wow, So what exactly is a copyright? Timothy B. McCormack: A copyright is a legal property right one has in photographs, art, books, music, and artistic work. There are six exclusive copyrights and the most famous of which is the right to prevent other people from making a copy of your work without your permission. Dan Kennedy: If you write a book or create an image, do you own it forever? Timothy B. McCormack: If you write a book or take a picture you do not own it forever. You own it for your life plus 70 years, for your eras. Corporations are a flat 100 years. Dan Kennedy: What happens when photograph copyright expires? Tim McCormack: When copyright expire the photograph or the book goes into the public domain. What that means is it's free for everyone to use. Danny Kennedy: What if a copyright is not in the public domain? Timothy B. McCormack: If a photograph or book or painting is not in the public domain. It's copyrighted. The general rule is if you didn't create it you can't use it. Now there are exceptions. This video for example is going to be licensed under which is called, Creative Commons. That means you can copy it, you can distribute it, you can use it for educational purposes. You can't use it for commercial, you got to give attributions, and you can't change it. Damages for unauthorized use of copyrights can be pretty stiff. Up to $150,000, per infringement. So for example, unwillful infringement of ten images equals $1.5 million dollars. Danny Kennedy: Is there a way to figure out what is in the public domain? Timothy B. McCormack: Figuring out what's in the public domain is actually a tricky question. Certainly, anything like before 1923, is generally in the public domain, but even then you have to be careful. If I take a modern photograph of the Mona Lisa for example, I have a thin copyright in my picture of that painting. You can't use my picture; you got to go take your own. Danny Kennedy: So anything before 1923? Timothy B. McCormack: Generally, anything before 1923, is going to be in public domain. There are some new ones to that rule. Duke University Press actually did a pretty good treatment of that in a book called Bound by Law; it's actually a comic book. If you Google that, you can download a free copy. Generally, anything before 1923, but keep this in mind. The modern 35MM camera was invented around 1919 that means almost all photographs are copy righted. Danny Kennedy: How do you know it's actually copyrighted? Timothy B. McCormack: The moment a work of art is created it copyrights, that is the rule. The law wants to protect artist, photographers, and other creative people to make sure they get paid for their work. These copyrights help drive the economy. These artist and photographers help document the world, we want these people to get paid its important. This series is also relevant to copyright enforcement education and relates to topics such as Getty Images Demand Letters and Copyright Enforcement Demand Letters The series is also offered under the Creative Commons license and is designed to be distributed for non-commercial educational purposes. This is a legal series. The series is good for business owners, judges, law makers, inventors and creative people like photographers, artists and web designers. Topics range from copyright infringement liability to Getty Images Demand letter type issues. Visit Us at: http://thetradesecretsofintellectualproperty.com/
Views: 7731 Timothy McCormack
Distinguishing Patents from Trade Secrets
 
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What's the difference between a patent and a trade secret? Both are forms of intellectual property that protect ideas, but they are very different in their subject matter and scope of protection.
Views: 216 kieranpatrick
How to decide between pursuing patent protection vs trade secret protection
 
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John Stonier discusses some considerations when deciding between patent and trade secret protection http://innovativity.com.au/patent-vs-trade-secret/
U.S. Intellectual Property Law-Overview of Trade Secrets
 
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IP, overview of trade secrets
Views: 914 Ida M. Jones
Protect Your Trade Secrets
 
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Protect Your Trade Secrets http://www.AscentLawFirm.com #AscentLaw Ascent Law, LLC 8833 S. Redwood Road, Suite C West Jordan, Utah 84088 (801) 676-5506 XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX I want to give special thanks to StartoTV for releasing How To Protect Your Intellectual Property & Trade Secrets. Here are some of my other favorite youtubers and their videos! Lecture 34: Trade Secrets and Protection Copyrights, Trademarks, Patents & Trade Secrets: Protecting Your Idea - How To Start A Business Understanding The 4 Types Of Intellectual Property Intellectual Property: Patents, Trademarks, and Copyright Intellectual Property: Trade Secrets How to Protect and Commercialize Intellectual Property - Entrepreneurship 101 2009/10 Trade Secrets Protecting Trade Secrets How to protect your intellectual property | WSGR Startup Basics Common Mistakes New Restaurant Owners Make PROTECTING YOUR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY- Trademarks How To Protect Your Ideas - Patents! How to protect intellectual property of your business or startup Intellectual Property Law - Tutorial 1 - Introduction Overview of Trade Secret Law | 56 of 62 Intro to Patent Law - Jeff Schox // Startup Elements The Four Flavors of Intellectual Property: Patents, Copyright, Trademarks, and Trade Secrets Patents Copyrights and Trade Secrets What are Trade Secrets? The Michelson 20MM Foundation docstocTV docstocTV DardenMBA shaunhailey1 Kauffman FoundersSchool MaRS Entrepreneurship Programs USPTOvideo The Internicola Law Firm, P.C. This Week In Startups RestaurantOwner Howard Cohn Jay Start & Grow Your Business Sarmad Saleh - Reviewsforyoutoo Michigan Engineering Rock Health Salk Institute TonyFizzle Jason Mance Gordon Take a look at StartoTV stats and you'll understand why I am a fan. Video Url: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5t-WOvifb6c Video Title: How To Protect Your Intellectual Property & Trade Secrets Username: StartoTV Subscribers: 356 Views: 4,552 views -------------------------
Views: 328 Ascent Law LLC
What is Patent Rights || in Telugu || by Sunil Santhosh
 
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What is meant by patent rights in telugu.... Background music taken from the given below link👇👇👇.... https://youtu.be/vQuTNc-KUhM
Views: 10275 Sunil Santhosh
Anatomy of a Patent | IP series 5 of 62
 
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Intellectual Property for Start Ups This series of videos, designed to assist entrepreneurs during their start up period, covers over 60 topics, including patents, copyrights and trademarks. The videos were designed to help guide start-ups through the important basic concepts of intellectual property. About the Professor: Professor Bryce C. Pilz (http://www.law.umich.edu/FacultyBio/P...) is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Law in the Entrepreneurship Clinic (http://www.law.umich.edu/clinical/ent...) at the University of Michigan who represents tech start-ups concerning intellectual property, incorporation, and financing matters. Prior to joining the Law School, Pilz practiced at Kirkland & Ellis LLP in the firm's intellectual property practice and clerked for Judge Amy J. St. Eve in the Northern District of Illinois. Most recently, he served as Associate General Counsel at the University of Michigan, where he worked with the Office of Technology Transfer on start-ups and licensing. Pilz was part of a team that spun-out more than 60 tech start-ups and entered into more than 500 technology licenses over a five-year period. Pilz also assisted in the creation of the University's Venture Accelerator at the North Campus Research Complex and advised the Center for Entrepreneurship on student entrepreneurship matters. Prof. Pilz has also served as a National Science Foundation I-Corps mentor and teaches in the University's Master of Entrepreneurship program. CFE: http://www.cfe.umich.edu/ I-Corps: http://www.cfe.umich.edu/innovation-corps Masters of Entrepreneurship: http://entrepreneurship.umich.edu/ How to use these resource videos: The outline below will help you identify the topic/video most important to you. I. INTRODUCTION 1 • Overview of start-up intellectual property issues 2 • Overview of categories of intellectual property II. PATENTS A. An Overview of Patent Rights 3 • Overview of patent system 4 • Patent remedies and why to patent 5 • Anatomy of a patent 6 • What are patent rights? 7 • Patent term -- How long does a patent last? B. What Can Be Patented? 8 • Patentability and eligibility overview 9 • Patent eligibility -- What inventions are eligible for patent protection 10 • Patentability: Novelty 11 • What is Prior Art 12 • Patentability: Obviousness 13 • Patentability: Written description and enablement 14 • Public Disclosure Issues C. Obtaining a Patent 15 • Patent application process 16 • Provisional patent applications 17 • Selecting a patent attorney 18 • International patent protection 19 • Continuation patents 20 • Invention reporting: mining for inventions D. Patent Inventorship and Ownership 21 • Patent inventorship 22 • Joint inventorship 23 • joint ownership 24 • Patent ownership 25 • Patent licensing 26 • University tech transfer 27 • Past employment issues E. Design Patents 28 • Overview of design patents F. Patent Infringement and Litigation 29 • Enforcing patent rights 30 • Freedom to operate 31 • Claim construction and claim charts 32 • Designing around the patent of another 33 • Defending against patent assertion 34 • Willfulness 35 • Invalidating third party patents 36 • Retaining patent litigation counsel III. COPYRIGHT A. What copyright protects 37 • Copyright Overview 38 • Idea/Expression 39 • Copyright registration 40 • User interface issues 41 • Software: patents v. copyrights B. Copyright ownership 42 • Works for hire 43 • Joint authorship 44 • Authorship compared to patent inventorship C. Avoiding copyright infringement 45 • Fair use 46 • Open source software 47 • Reverse engineering 48 • User generated content and DMCA take downs IV. TRADEMARKS A. Obtaining trademark protection 49 • Trademark overview 50 • Trademark registration 51 • Distinctiveness: selecting a strong name B. Clearing your company or product name 52 • Performing an initial trademark clearance 53 • Likelihood of confusion C. Using trademarks of others 54 • Nominal and fair use 55 • Intermediate trademark uses V. TRADE SECRETS A. Protecting your trade secrets 56 • Overview of trade secrets 57 • Trade secret policies 58 • Enforcing trade secrets 59 • Disclosing secrets under nondisclosure agreements B. Avoiding infringing others' trade secrets 60 • Hiring personnel 61 • Non-compete agreements 62 • Obtaining information pursuant to nondisclosure agreements
Views: 1743 Michigan Engineering
How to protect your ideas in South Africa
 
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This video is all about the how you can protect your ideas. We look at the four main ways of protection. They include copyrights, trademarks, patents, and trade secrets. There are also links to resources that can help you get more information about intellectual property. 1. Copyright This type of protection is normally used in works of content such as written material (books, articles, etc), music, videos, etc. You do not need to register for it in South Africa as you automatically get it upon putting your work out into the public. Please note that in some industries have certain organisations that do need some registration like in the instance of SAMRO. They deal mostly with music. Also, in some countries, you have to register your work to in order to fully get your copyrights recognised. Please do more research with the relevant organisation in your country. 2. Trademarks These apply mostly to names and symbols used to differentiate your offering from others. Trademarks are what customers see, normally on the outside of your products. Logos, Taglines, symbols, and even colours can be registered as Trademarks. You will see a registered trademark by it having a (TM) or an R inside a circle (R), especially when the trademark is relatively new in the market. 3. Patents Patents deal a lot with new things. It can be a new way of processing something, a new design, a new formula, etc. In South Africa, we have the option of applying for a Provisional Patent before going for the main one. A provisional is much cheaper but only lasts for a single year after which you have to apply for the main patent. You do not need to be a patent lawyer to apply for these but you do need to do your research if you're going to do it yourself. 4. Trade Secrets Trade secrets are exactly that, secrets. These do not necessarily need to be registered. All you need is for everyone who knows about your trade secret to keep their mouths shut. In most organisations, high-level executives sign contracts whereby they promise to never reveal the company's trade secrets, even if they get fired or retire from the company. In all, this is a field in itself. Please do more research by visiting the CIPC website if you are in South Africa. ====CIPC Website=== www.cipc.co.za =================== ==SAMRO Website=== www.samro.org.za ================== ===US Patent Office=== www.uspto.gov =================== Find me on social media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/muzi.xaba Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/muzixaba Twitter: https://twitter.com/muzixaba
Views: 1476 Muzi Xaba
What is Intellectual Property?
 
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Intellectual Property law overview. Patents, Trademarks, Copyrights, Trade Secrets explanation of each area of the law and how they are different, and how they are similar. Intellectual property is distinguished from all other property rights in that they are both intangible and inexhaustible. Intellectual property is similar to other property rights in that they each posses the right to exclude. Patents protect inventions. New, useful, non-obvious processes, machines, articles of manufacture, and compositions of matter Copyrights protect expressions of ideas, not the underlying idea. Trade Secrets protect information and ideas of commercial value which are secret Trademarks protect the symbols by which products and services are identified in the marketplace.
Views: 1974 exfrr
IP/Technology 2013 Update: Trademark, Copyright, Trade Secret, and Unfair Competition Program
 
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In this video, Arnold & Porter LLP attorneys review the significant cases and legal developments over the last year, including the application of the first sale doctrine to copyrighted goods manufactured outside the U.S. (Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.), whether Aereo, Inc.'s online streaming television service constitutes an unauthorized public performance of protected content under the Copyright Act (WNET v. Aereo, Inc.), the legality of ad-skipping technology in satellite and cable transmissions (Fox v. Dish Network), the protectability of color marks (Christian Louboutin SA v. Yves Saint Laurent), keywords and the functionality doctrine (Rosetta Stone v. Google), and an update on ICANN's new gTLD program. The video also addresses the interaction between trade secret law and social media, including the growing body of case law regarding the ownership of social media accounts, their ability to be protected under existing trade secret doctrines, and how companies can effectively use agreements with their employees to protect themselves given these and other recent developments in trade secret law. Presenters:John Ulin, Jim Blackburn, Tracy Lane, and Sarah Givan.
What's the difference between a trade secret and a patent?
 
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If you've got a question about intellectual property, we have a series of videos that answer some frequently asked questions. In this video, AJ Park principal Anton Blijlevens explains the difference between a trade secret and a patent.
Views: 51 AJ Park
Trillion Dollar Rip-Off: Social Networking is a Stolen Trade Secret
 
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Here is the full interview series: https://aim4truth.org/2017/11/21/facebook-unmasked-how-the-worlds-most-relevant-entrepreneur-was-screwed-by-zuckerberg/ Douglas Gabriel interviews Michael McKibben in PART 1 of SIX interviews. One of the largest government sponsored industrial espionage thefts of copyrights, trade secrets, and patents in modern times was the theft of scalable social networking inventions. The technology and programming code that underlie Facebook, Gmail, YouTube, Twitter, Instagram and most the other large-scale social networking companies runs on Leader Technologies’ intellectual property. It was stolen by a group of criminal lawyers, judges, spies and bankers working with complete impunity and in total disregard for the law. Under the guise of the IBM Eclipse Foundation, James P. Chandler III (who was a national security advisor and top White House attorney) led the group of criminals who, interestingly enough, are also appearing in the news currently due to their most recently discovered crimes, along with John Podesta, Robert Mueller, Rod Rosenstein, John Breyer, James Breyer, Larry Summers, Yuri Milner, Alisher Usmanov, Mark Zuckerberg, Sheryl Sandberg, Bill and Hillary Clinton, and a host of others who are not so well known. Notices: Unless marked otherwise, American Intelligence Media (AIM), Aim4Truth.org, copyright claims are waived. Reproduction is permitted with or without attribution. This content and its links may contain opinion. As with all opinion, it should not be relied upon without independent verification. Think for yourself. Fair Use is relied upon for all content. For educational purposes only. No claims are made to the properties of third parties.
Brilliant Protection - Patents, Trade Secrets and Digital Rights For The New Environment Pt. 3
 
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#TrendPOV #Tip - Combine patents and trade secrets for greater IP protection with agility http://bit.ly/fEDi03
Views: 175 Dr. Amy Messegee
Monetizing IP: Extracting Value from Trade Secrets, Patents & other Intellectual Property
 
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https://www.transactionadvisors.com/conferences This session from the Transaction Advisors Deals Forum: Private Equity & Middle Market Transaction Structuring conference discussed IP-related deal considerations, including sale preparation for privately held businesses, and how public companies view IP-driven acquisitions. Ryan Zurek, Investments Director at Ocean Tomo; Adam Petravicius, Partner at Kirkland & Ellis; and Saumil Mehta, Vice President & Assistant General Counsel at Gogo delved into financial sponsor interest in transactions involving patents, trademarks, R&D teams, and other intellectual property. Other topics included core deal structuring concerns, as well as the increasing importance of negotiations over data and IoT. Beginning with a comparison of pure play deals to more complex transactions, the presenters described how companies have been strategizing to maximize IP value amid legal constraints and rapidly changing technology. Pure play companies have been shifting from investing in R&D for technology to spinning out those divisions to other entities that will commercialize it. Meanwhile, there has been a rise in commercialization deals as a greater number of operating companies have been eyeing larger IP transactions as opposed to non-practicing entity (NPE) spin-outs, where only a few patents are involved. For complex transactions, issues involved how best to split-up the IP to extract greater value, as well as due diligence challenges when the target is not the IP itself but a larger enterprise. To bolster their top line, companies have been increasingly using their patent portfolios to derive licensing revenues. Firms – particularly those whose businesses focus on audio components, technology, chemicals or OLED television – are starting to become proactive about how to leverage this asset class to create additional revenue streams. From a banking perspective, companies are increasingly becoming more active about using their IP portfolio to raise growth equity, or do a spin-off or other type of transaction. While there have been no shortage of startups or venture capital-type firms seeking to leverage their IP for these purposes, there has also been a recent rise in Fortune 500 companies as well. Copyrights and trade secrets were also highlighted as becoming more profitable as software patents face diminished value considering recent Supreme Court and Federal Circuit decisions. The presenters also pointed out that ambiguity around “big data” and IoT has created friction among companies, who have been accelerating their purchases in these businesses largely based on speculation. Although a lot of data and IoT-centered discussions continue to take place at the transaction level, more of them are rising to C-level as the business becomes the life blood of companies.
Overview of the Patent System | IP series 3 of 62
 
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Intellectual Property for Start Ups This series of videos, designed to assist entrepreneurs during their start up period, covers over 60 topics, including patents, copyrights and trademarks. The videos were designed to help guide start-ups through the important basic concepts of intellectual property. About the Professor: Professor Bryce C. Pilz (http://www.law.umich.edu/FacultyBio/P...) is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Law in the Entrepreneurship Clinic (http://www.law.umich.edu/clinical/ent...) at the University of Michigan who represents tech start-ups concerning intellectual property, incorporation, and financing matters. Prior to joining the Law School, Pilz practiced at Kirkland & Ellis LLP in the firm's intellectual property practice and clerked for Judge Amy J. St. Eve in the Northern District of Illinois. Most recently, he served as Associate General Counsel at the University of Michigan, where he worked with the Office of Technology Transfer on start-ups and licensing. Pilz was part of a team that spun-out more than 60 tech start-ups and entered into more than 500 technology licenses over a five-year period. Pilz also assisted in the creation of the University's Venture Accelerator at the North Campus Research Complex and advised the Center for Entrepreneurship on student entrepreneurship matters. Prof. Pilz has also served as a National Science Foundation I-Corps mentor and teaches in the University's Master of Entrepreneurship program. CFE: http://www.cfe.umich.edu/ I-Corps: http://www.cfe.umich.edu/innovation-corps Masters of Entrepreneurship: http://entrepreneurship.umich.edu/ How to use these resource videos: The outline below will help you identify the topic/video most important to you. I. INTRODUCTION 1 • Overview of start-up intellectual property issues 2 • Overview of categories of intellectual property II. PATENTS A. An Overview of Patent Rights 3 • Overview of patent system 4 • Patent remedies and why to patent 5 • Anatomy of a patent 6 • What are patent rights? 7 • Patent term -- How long does a patent last? B. What Can Be Patented? 8 • Patentability and eligibility overview 9 • Patent eligibility -- What inventions are eligible for patent protection 10 • Patentability: Novelty 11 • What is Prior Art 12 • Patentability: Obviousness 13 • Patentability: Written description and enablement 14 • Public Disclosure Issues C. Obtaining a Patent 15 • Patent application process 16 • Provisional patent applications 17 • Selecting a patent attorney 18 • International patent protection 19 • Continuation patents 20 • Invention reporting: mining for inventions D. Patent Inventorship and Ownership 21 • Patent inventorship 22 • Joint inventorship 23 • joint ownership 24 • Patent ownership 25 • Patent licensing 26 • University tech transfer 27 • Past employment issues E. Design Patents 28 • Overview of design patents F. Patent Infringement and Litigation 29 • Enforcing patent rights 30 • Freedom to operate 31 • Claim construction and claim charts 32 • Designing around the patent of another 33 • Defending against patent assertion 34 • Willfulness 35 • Invalidating third party patents 36 • Retaining patent litigation counsel III. COPYRIGHT A. What copyright protects 37 • Copyright Overview 38 • Idea/Expression 39 • Copyright registration 40 • User interface issues 41 • Software: patents v. copyrights B. Copyright ownership 42 • Works for hire 43 • Joint authorship 44 • Authorship compared to patent inventorship C. Avoiding copyright infringement 45 • Fair use 46 • Open source software 47 • Reverse engineering 48 • User generated content and DMCA take downs IV. TRADEMARKS A. Obtaining trademark protection 49 • Trademark overview 50 • Trademark registration 51 • Distinctiveness: selecting a strong name B. Clearing your company or product name 52 • Performing an initial trademark clearance 53 • Likelihood of confusion C. Using trademarks of others 54 • Nominal and fair use 55 • Intermediate trademark uses V. TRADE SECRETS A. Protecting your trade secrets 56 • Overview of trade secrets 57 • Trade secret policies 58 • Enforcing trade secrets 59 • Disclosing secrets under nondisclosure agreements B. Avoiding infringing others' trade secrets 60 • Hiring personnel 61 • Non-compete agreements 62 • Obtaining information pursuant to nondisclosure agreements
Views: 2866 Michigan Engineering
Overview on Intellectual property Rights (IPR)
 
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In today’s dynamic and competitive business environment, Intellectual Property or IP is a key element required to have a competitive edge in the market. Different forms of IP such as Patents, Copyrights, Trademark, Industrial design, Semiconductor Integrated Circuits (IC) Layout Design Act 2000 , Geographical indication, Trade Secret, Traditional knowledge and Protection of Plant Variety and Farmer’s Rights Act, 2001 are business assets and hence form an integral part of the business process. Effective creation, acquisition, protection, management, exploitation and enforcement of IP can mean the difference between success and failure in businesses today. For business growth of any enterprise, it is important to protect the innovation and ensure that IP rights of any third party are not infringed.
Views: 7407 Origiin IP Academy
Intellectual Property [PART 4]: Trade Secrets | A Minute Smarter - 023
 
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Do you know what protects the intellectual property of companies like KFC and Coca Cola? Find out in this episode of A Minute Smarter. —————————— TRANSCRIPT: Intellectual property—part four: trade secrets. Coming up next on A Minute Smarter. The fourth type of intellectual property, in addition to patents, trademarks, and copyrights, is trade secrets. Trade secrets consist of information and can include a formula, pattern, compilation, program, device, method, technique or process. To meet the most common definition of a trade secret, it must be used in business, and give an opportunity to obtain an economic advantage over competitors who do not know or use it. The USPTO further states that trade secrets commonly share these three elements: A trade secret is information that has value by virtue of not being generally known. The information has value to others who cannot legitimately obtain the information. The information is subject to reasonable efforts to maintain its secrecy. Additionally, it is a business’ responsibility to identify and secure its own trade secrets. A well-known example of a trade secret is Colonel Sanders’ special blend of herbs and spices for his Kentucky Fried Chicken. The original handwritten recipe is kept in a safe in Kentucky, and only a few select employees know the recipe and are bound by a confidentiality agreement. Another example is soft drink giant, Coca-Cola. They chose to brand their recipe as a trade secret rather than patenting it. Why? Because under a patent the ingredients would eventually be disclosed. As a trade secret, it can be kept a secret forever. For more information on trade secrets, visit www.USPTO.gov. And now, you’re a minute smarter. —————————— Connect with us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JMGAcreative/ Connect with us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jmgaartist Connect with us on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/juliamcfarland/ Visit our website: www.jmgacreative.com email us: [email protected] call us: 618-633-1861
Views: 26 JMGA Creative
Software Trade Secrets Defined
 
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Buy The Software IP Detective's Handbook: Measurement, Comparison, and Infringement Detection: http://www.informit.com/store/product.aspx?isbn=0137035330 The Software IP Detective's Handbook author, Bob Zeidman, discusses software trade secrets, the steps needed to protect them, and how trade secret protection differs from patent protection.
Views: 146 OnSoftware
Brilliant Protection - Patents, Trade Secrets and Digital Rights For The New Environment Pt. 2
 
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#TrendPOV #Tip - Protect your IP with trade secrets when you cannot wait for patents http://bit.ly/fEDi03
Views: 228 Dr. Amy Messegee
Trade Secrets
 
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If you want to learn about Trade Secrets this video provides a brief, yet informative introduction on what Trade Secrets are, why you should protect them, how they can impact a business’s bottom line, and their importance as Intellectual Property. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2mEMvX0. The video was produced by the Global Intellectual Property Academy in conjunction with the Office of Policy and International Affairs Enforcement team.
Views: 6785 USPTOvideo
Basic Facts: Trademarks, Patents, and Copyrights
 
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This video provides a quick and easy breakdown of the three main types of intellectual property: trademarks, patents, and copyrights. You’ll learn how trademarks differ from domain names and business names. By the end of the video, you’ll understand how to use each type of intellectual property to protect a different aspect of your business. Enhanced Accessibility Version:http://helix-1.uspto.gov/player/BasicFacts_TrademarksPatentsAndCopyrights_508.html To stay current with the USPTO, subscribe to regular e-mail updates at http://www.uspto.gov/subscribe.
Views: 221787 USPTOvideo

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