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Selena Hastings: "The Secret Lives of Somerset Maugham"
 
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I have been a devoted fan of Somerset Maugham's writing since 2003. That was the year when I first set off on my independent travels, and after a few weeks I washed up in Vienna with nothing to read. I found a second-hand bookshop trading in English literature as well as German, and I was captivated by the cover of 'The Razor's Edge'. Since then I've read more books by Somerset Maugham than by any other author, and although I haven't loved each and every one of them, I've always found something valuable withing their pages. This biography by Selena Hastings is a fascinating and insightful examination of the great writer's life. As with all biographies, though, it ends on a sad note, with the author's decrepitude and eventual death making the final chapters a particular struggle for anyone sentimental about Maugham - like me. If you would like to get hold of a copy of this magnificent book, check out the Amazon listing here: http://amzn.to/2BDQuuG
Robert Calder on W. Somerset Maugham, Part I.mov
 
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On January 19, 2013, Robert Calder, the world's foremost authority on W. Somerset Maugham, talked about his research and books he has written on W. Somerset Maugham. This was Mr. Calder's first appearance at D.G. Wills Book Store in La Jolla, California.
Views: 15617 DGWillsBooks
W Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) - The Relations of Art and Life
 
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This 1960s interview with W Somerset Maugham is somewhat a companion piece to my upload ‘E M Forster Talks About Writing Novels - 'Only Connect’’ in that both writers are talking about the connections of literature and life and what they tried to achieve in their novels. On a personal note, Maugham said of himself in another context: "I was a quarter normal and three-quarters queer, but I tried to persuade myself it was the other way round. That was my greatest mistake." Attracted to both sexes as a young man, Maugham proposed marriage to Sue Jones and was refused. He simultaneously began affaires with Gerald Haxton and Syrie Barnardo Wellcome, who was married at the time to the pharmaceutical magnate. His daughter, Mary Elizabeth Wellcome, was born in 1915. From this point on till an acrimonious divorce in the late 1920s, Maugham mostly travelled the world with Haxton, who had been deported from the UK in 1919 as 'an undesirable alien and a security risk' - code for he had too many indescrete gay relationships. Maugham and Haxton settled at Villa Mauresque, on the French Riviera till the younger man's death from alcoholism in 1944 when the writer took up with Alan Searle. To rush off at another tangent, I’ve loved Maugham’s almost Oscar Wilde-ish Noel Coward-ish humour since I was a child: [1] At a dinner party one should eat wisely but not too well, and talk well but not too wisely. [2] Excess on occasion is exhilarating. It prevents moderation from acquiring the deadening effect of a habit. [3] It was such a lovely day I thought it a pity to get up. [4] It's a funny thing about life; if you refuse to accept anything but the best, you very often get it. [5] She had a pretty gift for quotation, which is a serviceable substitute for wit. [6] There are three rules for writing the novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are. [7] Tradition is a guide and not a jailer. [8] When you have loved as she has loved, you grow old beautifully. [9] Like all weak men he laid an exaggerated stress on not changing one's mind. [10] Art is merely the refuge which the ingenious have invented, when they were supplied with food and women, to escape the tediousness of life. [11] Follow your inclinations with due regard to the policeman round the corner. [12] Dying is a very dull, dreary affair. And my advice to you is to have nothing whatever to do with it. Enjoy!
Views: 1032 John Hall
BBC Radio Drama - Flotsam & Jetsam by W Somerset Maugham
 
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Skelton, a sick anthropologist suffering from malaria, is left at a lonely outstation in Borneo. There is something very odd about the white couple who live there - what lies behind their strange behaviour? With Douglas Blackwell and Maddie Head Second in a series of six plays dramatised and narrated by David Buck Directed by Walter Acosta BBC World Service (1983-03-03) Thirty Minute Theatre (Some of the audio is a little warbly) Many thanks to the original uploader Image thanks to labanglonghouse
Views: 4704 Cecily Parsley
BBC Radio Drama - The Tenth Man by W Somerset Maugham
 
01:25:43
The Tenth Man by W Somerset Maugham was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 FM on 26th December 1970 George Winter had built a fortune on a simple premise-nine men out of ten are either rogues or fools. But had he thought that one day the tenth man might cross his path? Adapted by Peggy Wells Produced by David Geary Lord Francis Etchingham: Hector Ross Lady Etchingham: Joan Matheson Catherine Winter: Patricia Gallimore George Winter: Clifford Norgate Anne Etchingham: Venetia Maxwell Edward O'Donell: David Robb Thompson: Patrick Tull Robert Colby: Peter Williams Frederick Bennett: Martin Friend The Prime Minister: Carleton Hobbs Swalecliffe: Michael Kilgarriff Ford: Gerald Cross Colonel Boyce: Charles Simon Saturday-Night Theatre BBC Radio 4 FM, 26 December 1970 20.30
Views: 10907 Cecily Parsley
W. Somerset Maugham - The Punctiliousness Of Don Sebastian
 
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William Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. After losing both his parents by the age of 10, Maugham was raised by a paternal uncle who was emotionally cold. Not wanting to become a lawyer like other men in his family, Maugham eventually trained and qualified as a doctor. The first run of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), sold out so rapidly that Maugham gave up medicine to write full-time. During the First World War, he served with the Red Cross and in the ambulance corps, before being recruited in 1916 into the British Secret Intelligence Service, for which he worked in Switzerland and Russia before the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. During and after the war, he traveled in India and Southeast Asia; all of these experiences were reflected in later short stories and novels. Maugham's father, Robert Ormond Maugham, was a lawyer who handled the legal affairs of the British embassy in Paris. Since French law declared that all children born on French soil could be conscripted for military service, his father arranged for Maugham to be born at the embassy, technically on British soil. His grandfather, another Robert, had also been a prominent lawyer and co-founder of the English Law Society. It was taken for granted that Maugham and his brothers would follow in their footsteps. His elder brother Viscount Maugham enjoyed a distinguished legal career and served as Lord Chancellor from 1938 to 1939. Maugham's mother, Edith Mary (née Snell), had tuberculosis (TB), a condition for which her doctor prescribed childbirth. She had Maugham several years after the last of his three older brothers; they were already enrolled in boarding school by the time he was three. Being the youngest, he was effectively raised as an only child. Edith's sixth and final son died on 25 January 1882, one day after his birth, on Maugham's eighth birthday. Edith died of TB six days later on 31 January at the age of 41. The early death of his mother left Maugham traumatized; he kept his mother's photograph by his bedside for the rest of his life. Two years after Edith's death, Maugham's father died in France of cancer. By 1914, Maugham was famous, with 10 plays produced and 10 novels published. Too old to enlist when the First World War broke out, he served in France as a member of the British Red Cross's so-called "Literary Ambulance Drivers", a group of some 24 well-known writers, including the Americans John Dos Passos and E. E. Cummings. During this time, he met Frederick Gerald Haxton, a young San Franciscan, who became his companion and lover until Haxton's death in 1944. Throughout this period, Maugham continued to write. He proofread Of Human Bondage at a location near Dunkirk during a lull in his ambulance duties. Of Human Bondage (1915) initially was criticized in both England and the United States; the New York World described the romantic obsession of the protagonist Philip Carey as "the sentimental servitude of a poor fool". The influential American novelist and critic Theodore Dreiser rescued the novel, referring to it as a work of genius and comparing it to a Beethoven symphony. His review gave the book a lift, and it has never been out of print since. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 17 A Room With A Past
BBC Radio Drama - The Sacred Flame by W Somerset Maugham
 
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The Sacred Flame by W Somerset Maugham was broadcast on BBC Home Service Basic on 17th July 1965 Maurice, invalided following an air crash, is determined to remain cheerful. But his condition affects all those who are close to him. 'They tell me that one of these days they'll try operating again to see if they can put me right. But I know they're lying. I'm here for life.' Starring Sybil Thorndike with Jill Balcon and Carleton Hobbs Adapted for radio by Peter Watts Produced and directed by Graham Gauld Maurice Tabret: John Graham Dr Harvester: Stephen Jack Mrs Tabret: Sybil Thorndike Nurse Wayland: Jill Balcon Alice: Jo Manning Wilson Major Liconda: Carleton Hobbs Stella Tabret: Pat Pleasance Colin Tabret: Denis Goacher
Views: 4283 Cecily Parsley
BBC Radio Drama - Maugham's Eye View - The Round Dozen by W Somerset Maugham
 
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The Round Dozen by W Somerset Maugham was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 FM on 20 March 1996 The third of six of W Somerset Maugham's short stories dramatised by Neville Teller and narrated by Dirk Bogarde. With 11 wives behind him, the celebrated bigamist Mortimer Ellis is looking to complete the dozen. Sorry this recording has a few wobbles - my early internet connection days! Mortimer Eliis: Michael Williams Miss Porchester: Joanna David Mr StClair: Denys Hawthorne Mrs StClair: Zulema Dene with Jane Whittenshaw, Paul Jenkins and Stephen Critchlow. Directed by Janet Whitaker Image thanks to DaveJonesphotography
Views: 4419 Cecily Parsley
W. Somerset Maugham - Faith
 
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William Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. After losing both his parents by the age of 10, Maugham was raised by a paternal uncle who was emotionally cold. Not wanting to become a lawyer like other men in his family, Maugham eventually trained and qualified as a doctor. The first run of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), sold out so rapidly that Maugham gave up medicine to write full-time. During the First World War, he served with the Red Cross and in the ambulance corps, before being recruited in 1916 into the British Secret Intelligence Service, for which he worked in Switzerland and Russia before the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. During and after the war, he traveled in India and Southeast Asia; all of these experiences were reflected in later short stories and novels. Maugham's father, Robert Ormond Maugham, was a lawyer who handled the legal affairs of the British embassy in Paris. Since French law declared that all children born on French soil could be conscripted for military service, his father arranged for Maugham to be born at the embassy, technically on British soil. His grandfather, another Robert, had also been a prominent lawyer and co-founder of the English Law Society. It was taken for granted that Maugham and his brothers would follow in their footsteps. His elder brother Viscount Maugham enjoyed a distinguished legal career and served as Lord Chancellor from 1938 to 1939. Maugham's mother, Edith Mary (née Snell), had tuberculosis (TB), a condition for which her doctor prescribed childbirth. She had Maugham several years after the last of his three older brothers; they were already enrolled in boarding school by the time he was three. Being the youngest, he was effectively raised as an only child. Edith's sixth and final son died on 25 January 1882, one day after his birth, on Maugham's eighth birthday. Edith died of TB six days later on 31 January at the age of 41. The early death of his mother left Maugham traumatized; he kept his mother's photograph by his bedside for the rest of his life. Two years after Edith's death, Maugham's father died in France of cancer. By 1914, Maugham was famous, with 10 plays produced and 10 novels published. Too old to enlist when the First World War broke out, he served in France as a member of the British Red Cross's so-called "Literary Ambulance Drivers", a group of some 24 well-known writers, including the Americans John Dos Passos and E. E. Cummings. During this time, he met Frederick Gerald Haxton, a young San Franciscan, who became his companion and lover until Haxton's death in 1944. Throughout this period, Maugham continued to write. He proofread Of Human Bondage at a location near Dunkirk during a lull in his ambulance duties. Of Human Bondage (1915) initially was criticized in both England and the United States; the New York World described the romantic obsession of the protagonist Philip Carey as "the sentimental servitude of a poor fool". The influential American novelist and critic Theodore Dreiser rescued the novel, referring to it as a work of genius and comparing it to a Beethoven symphony. His review gave the book a lift, and it has never been out of print since. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 16 A Room With A Past
Encore 1951 (W. Somerset Maugham)
 
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http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0044586/
Views: 394054 arrinna77
BBC Radio Drama - Winter Cruise by W Somerset Maugham
 
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A garrulous spinster drives the crew of a cargo cruise ship to distraction. With Elizabeth Spriggs Last in a series of six plays dramatised and narrated by David Buck Directed by Gordon House BBC World Service (1984-03-01) Thirty Minute Theatre (Some of the audio is a little warbly) Many thanks to the original uploader Image thanks to kaisender
Views: 4022 Cecily Parsley
Rain   by W. Somerset MAUGHAM (1874 - 1965) by Short Stories Audiobooks
 
01:44:21
Rain by W. Somerset MAUGHAM (1874 - 1965) by Short Stories Audiobooks Rain W. Somerset MAUGHAM (1874 - 1965) One of Maugham's most famous short stories, Rain unfolds in a soggy tropical paradise marred by self-righteous hypocrites trying to force their moral beliefs on a girl who basically just wants to have fun. At a running time of approximately 2 1/2 hours, it is too long for inclusion in a Short Story collection.(Summary by BellonaTimes) Genre(s): Short Stories Language: English LibriVox recordings are Public Domain in the USA #rain #w #somerset #maugham #famous #short #stories #audiobooks #audio #books #english
William Somerset Maugham
 
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The Moon and Sixpence
Views: 207 Anna Pustovit
BBC RADIO DRAMA: FOR SERVICES RENDERED by Somerset Maugham
 
01:27:43
For Services Rendered by Somerset Maugham was adapted by Lu Kemp and broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013. Please note: How 'Ya Gonna Keep 'Em Down On The Farm sound recording (24:26 - 26:07) removed for copyright. Story: Set in late summer 1932 in Kent, the Ardsley family seem to be managing their lives very well but in reality each of them is fighting for survival. The Ardsley children are facing unpromising futures: Ethel is married to a former officer who is not quite the man she hoped he'd be; Eva is unmarried and approaching 40, martyring herself to the cause of their brother Sydney; Sydney has been blinded in the war; and Lois, at 27, is single and without a hope of marrying in the English backwater the family live in. The family must go through a seismic shift in order to survive. The younger generation can no longer live their lives in the blueprint of the older generation, they must find a new way of living. England is changing, falling apart, and must begin again. Cast: Leonard Ardsley - David Calder Charlotte Ardsley - Sian Thomas Sydney Ardsley - Tom Espiner Eva Ardsley - Cath Whitefield Lois Ardsley - Louise Brealey Ethel Bartlett - Mariah Gale Howard Bartlett - Michael Shaeffer Collie Stratton - Justin Salinger Wilfred Cedar - Ron Cook Gwen Cedar - Hettie Baynes Russell Dr Charles Prentice - John Rowe Gertrude - Philippa Stanton Directed by Lu Kemp
Views: 5634 ArchB Stanton
BBC Radio Drama - Maugham's Eye View - The Creative Impulse by W Somerset Maugham
 
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The Creative Impulse by W Somerset Maugham was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 FM, on 6th March 1996. The first of six of W Somerset Maugham's short stories dramatised by Neville Teller and narrated by Dirk Bogarde. The authoress Mrs Forrester is horrified when her husband runs off with the cook. NB: Sorry this recording has a few wobbles - my early internet connection days! Mrs Forrester: Sylvia Syms Albert Forrester: Desmond Barrit Mrs Bullfinch : Anne Field With Geoffrey Whitehead, David Collings, John Hartley, David Timson, Zulema Dene and Tracy Wiles. Directed by Janet Whitaker Image thanks to Sponchia
Views: 3779 Cecily Parsley
Mr Know-All (1950) W.Somerset Maugham
 
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Trio (1950) Max Kelada (Nigel Patrick) annoys his fellow passengers by dominating all the onboard social events, vesves by his insistence that he is an expert on all subjects. Stars: Nigel Patrick Anne Crawford Naunton Wayne Wilfrid Hyde-White Clive Morton Bill Travers Dennis Harkin Michael Medwin. Directed by Ken Annakin
Views: 6486 Raymond Sojka
Robert Calder on W. Somerset Maugham, Part II
 
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On January 19, 2013, Robert Calder, the world's foremost authority on W. Somerset Maugham, talked about his research and books he has written on W. Somerset Maugham. This was Mr. Calder's first appearance at the D.G. Wills Bookstore in La Jolla, California.
Views: 3127 DGWillsBooks
The Magician by  W.Somerset Maugham   Full  Audio book
 
07:57:20
http://bit.ly/Dion_Graham_Audio_Books Let Us Tell You a Story Find a Book and Start Listening: Romance, thrillers, young adult. Fiction, business, and bios - we've got them all in http://bit.ly/Get_Your_Free-AudioBook-Learn_More- library of more than 125,000 audiobooks. that will take you anywhere you want to go. Listen to a Great Book Every Month. Join http://bit.ly/Get_Your_Free-AudioBook-Learn_More and listen to your first book on us. Once you've finished your free trial, you'll enjoy one audiobook every month for $14.95 (USD). If one book just isn't enough, you can buy additional credits at any time. William Somerset Maugham CH (/ˈmɔːm/ mawm; 25 January 1874 – 16 December 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s.[1] After losing both his parents by the age of 10, Maugham was raised by a paternal uncle who was emotionally cold. Not wanting to become a lawyer like other men in his family, Maugham eventually trained and qualified as a physician. The initial run of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), sold out so rapidly that Maugham gave up medicine to write full-time. During the First World War, he served with the Red Cross and in the ambulance corps, before being recruited in 1916 into the British Secret Intelligence Service, for which he worked in Switzerland and Russia before the October Revolution of 1917. During and after the war, he travelled in India and Southeast Asia; all of these experiences were reflected in later short stories and novels.
Views: 6239 A Good channel
Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset MAUGHAM. AudioBook #1
 
08:42:13
Фантастика вслух... "Фантастика и фантасты. Повествование 7/92" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2AKIhFmazVc -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- LibriVox volunteers record chapters of books in the public domain, and then we release the audio files back onto the net for free. All LibriVox audio is in the public domain, so you may use it for whatever purpose you wish. LibriVox Objective “To make all books in the public domain available, for free, in audio format on the internet.” If you would like to thank a reader, we’d love to hear from you. This page will show you how: https://librivox.org/pages/thank-a-reader/ If you want to volunteer please visit https://librivox.org/
Views: 12045 # LookAudioBook
The Secret Life of Walter Mitty by James Thurber
 
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"The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" the classic 1939 short story by James Thurber, read by Patrick Frederic. The most famous of Thurber's stories, it first appeared in The New Yorker on March 18, 1939, and was first collected in his book My World and Welcome to It.
Views: 68684 Shyra Latiolais
Wedding Reception of Rangan & Tonni
 
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"The secret to life is meaningless unless you discover it yourself." ― W. Somerset Maugham, Of Human Bondage
Views: 380 Rahen Rangan
BBC Radio Drama - Lord Mountdrago by W Somerset Maugham
 
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When Lord Mountdrago exchanged the lonely eminence of the Foreign Office for a psychiatrist's couch, it was in the hope of discovering some explanation for a series of shameful and ridiculous dreams that had lately disturbed his august slumbers. Were these hallucinations the result of his own guilty conscience, or was he haunted indeed by the plebeian ghost of the man whose political career he had so cruelly and ruthlessly destroyed? With Charles Gray and Stephen Thorne Fourth in a series of six plays dramatised and narrated by David Buck Directed by Gordon House BBC World Service (1983-11-29) Thirty Minute Theatre (Some of the audio is a little warbly) Many thanks to the original uploader Image thanks to Foundry
Views: 2925 Cecily Parsley
W. Somerset Maugham - Rain (part 1)
 
44:33
William Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. After losing both his parents by the age of 10, Maugham was raised by a paternal uncle who was emotionally cold. Not wanting to become a lawyer like other men in his family, Maugham eventually trained and qualified as a doctor. The first run of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), sold out so rapidly that Maugham gave up medicine to write full-time. During the First World War, he served with the Red Cross and in the ambulance corps, before being recruited in 1916 into the British Secret Intelligence Service, for which he worked in Switzerland and Russia before the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. During and after the war, he traveled in India and Southeast Asia; all of these experiences were reflected in later short stories and novels. Maugham's father, Robert Ormond Maugham, was a lawyer who handled the legal affairs of the British embassy in Paris. Since French law declared that all children born on French soil could be conscripted for military service, his father arranged for Maugham to be born at the embassy, technically on British soil. His grandfather, another Robert, had also been a prominent lawyer and co-founder of the English Law Society. It was taken for granted that Maugham and his brothers would follow in their footsteps. His elder brother Viscount Maugham enjoyed a distinguished legal career and served as Lord Chancellor from 1938 to 1939. Maugham's mother, Edith Mary (née Snell), had tuberculosis (TB), a condition for which her doctor prescribed childbirth. She had Maugham several years after the last of his three older brothers; they were already enrolled in boarding school by the time he was three. Being the youngest, he was effectively raised as an only child. Edith's sixth and final son died on 25 January 1882, one day after his birth, on Maugham's eighth birthday. Edith died of TB six days later on 31 January at the age of 41. The early death of his mother left Maugham traumatized; he kept his mother's photograph by his bedside for the rest of his life. Two years after Edith's death, Maugham's father died in France of cancer. By 1914, Maugham was famous, with 10 plays produced and 10 novels published. Too old to enlist when the First World War broke out, he served in France as a member of the British Red Cross's so-called "Literary Ambulance Drivers", a group of some 24 well-known writers, including the Americans John Dos Passos and E. E. Cummings. During this time, he met Frederick Gerald Haxton, a young San Franciscan, who became his companion and lover until Haxton's death in 1944. Throughout this period, Maugham continued to write. He proofread Of Human Bondage at a location near Dunkirk during a lull in his ambulance duties. Of Human Bondage (1915) initially was criticized in both England and the United States; the New York World described the romantic obsession of the protagonist Philip Carey as "the sentimental servitude of a poor fool". The influential American novelist and critic Theodore Dreiser rescued the novel, referring to it as a work of genius and comparing it to a Beethoven symphony. His review gave the book a lift, and it has never been out of print since. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 24 A Room With A Past
W. Somerset Maugham - Daisy (part 1)
 
31:21
William Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. After losing both his parents by the age of 10, Maugham was raised by a paternal uncle who was emotionally cold. Not wanting to become a lawyer like other men in his family, Maugham eventually trained and qualified as a doctor. The first run of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), sold out so rapidly that Maugham gave up medicine to write full-time. During the First World War, he served with the Red Cross and in the ambulance corps, before being recruited in 1916 into the British Secret Intelligence Service, for which he worked in Switzerland and Russia before the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. During and after the war, he traveled in India and Southeast Asia; all of these experiences were reflected in later short stories and novels. Maugham's father, Robert Ormond Maugham, was a lawyer who handled the legal affairs of the British embassy in Paris. Since French law declared that all children born on French soil could be conscripted for military service, his father arranged for Maugham to be born at the embassy, technically on British soil. His grandfather, another Robert, had also been a prominent lawyer and co-founder of the English Law Society. It was taken for granted that Maugham and his brothers would follow in their footsteps. His elder brother Viscount Maugham enjoyed a distinguished legal career and served as Lord Chancellor from 1938 to 1939. Maugham's mother, Edith Mary (née Snell), had tuberculosis (TB), a condition for which her doctor prescribed childbirth. She had Maugham several years after the last of his three older brothers; they were already enrolled in boarding school by the time he was three. Being the youngest, he was effectively raised as an only child. Edith's sixth and final son died on 25 January 1882, one day after his birth, on Maugham's eighth birthday. Edith died of TB six days later on 31 January at the age of 41. The early death of his mother left Maugham traumatized; he kept his mother's photograph by his bedside for the rest of his life. Two years after Edith's death, Maugham's father died in France of cancer. By 1914, Maugham was famous, with 10 plays produced and 10 novels published. Too old to enlist when the First World War broke out, he served in France as a member of the British Red Cross's so-called "Literary Ambulance Drivers", a group of some 24 well-known writers, including the Americans John Dos Passos and E. E. Cummings. During this time, he met Frederick Gerald Haxton, a young San Franciscan, who became his companion and lover until Haxton's death in 1944. Throughout this period, Maugham continued to write. He proofread Of Human Bondage at a location near Dunkirk during a lull in his ambulance duties. Of Human Bondage (1915) initially was criticized in both England and the United States; the New York World described the romantic obsession of the protagonist Philip Carey as "the sentimental servitude of a poor fool". The influential American novelist and critic Theodore Dreiser rescued the novel, referring to it as a work of genius and comparing it to a Beethoven symphony. His review gave the book a lift, and it has never been out of print since. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 14 A Room With A Past
Honolulu by W Somerset Maugham |  Short Story | Full Unabridged AudioBook
 
56:56
http://bit.ly/Dion_Graham_Audio_Books Please watch, full relaxation: "6 Hour Relaxing Piano Music: Rain Sounds, Meditation Music, Relaxing Music, Soft Music, ♫96N" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZnZp8gql2fs -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Honolulu by W Somerset Maugham - Listen to full unabridged audiobook online for free on your beloved YouTube! Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MaxAudioBooksDotCom Visit our website: http://MaxAudioBooks.com Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MaxAudioBooks Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MaxAudioBooks Recorded by Librivox.org. If you want to volunteer please visit https://librivox.org/
Views: 4987 Priceless Audiobooks
W. Somerset Maugham - 1/33: Of Human Bondage
 
48:03
William Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. After losing both his parents by the age of 10, Maugham was raised by a paternal uncle who was emotionally cold. Not wanting to become a lawyer like other men in his family, Maugham eventually trained and qualified as a doctor. The first run of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), sold out so rapidly that Maugham gave up medicine to write full-time. During the First World War, he served with the Red Cross and in the ambulance corps, before being recruited in 1916 into the British Secret Intelligence Service, for which he worked in Switzerland and Russia before the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. During and after the war, he traveled in India and Southeast Asia; all of these experiences were reflected in later short stories and novels. Maugham's father, Robert Ormond Maugham, was a lawyer who handled the legal affairs of the British embassy in Paris. Since French law declared that all children born on French soil could be conscripted for military service, his father arranged for Maugham to be born at the embassy, technically on British soil. His grandfather, another Robert, had also been a prominent lawyer and co-founder of the English Law Society. It was taken for granted that Maugham and his brothers would follow in their footsteps. His elder brother Viscount Maugham enjoyed a distinguished legal career and served as Lord Chancellor from 1938 to 1939. Maugham's mother, Edith Mary (née Snell), had tuberculosis (TB), a condition for which her doctor prescribed childbirth. She had Maugham several years after the last of his three older brothers; they were already enrolled in boarding school by the time he was three. Being the youngest, he was effectively raised as an only child. Edith's sixth and final son died on 25 January 1882, one day after his birth, on Maugham's eighth birthday. Edith died of TB six days later on 31 January at the age of 41. The early death of his mother left Maugham traumatized; he kept his mother's photograph by his bedside for the rest of his life. Two years after Edith's death, Maugham's father died in France of cancer. By 1914, Maugham was famous, with 10 plays produced and 10 novels published. Too old to enlist when the First World War broke out, he served in France as a member of the British Red Cross's so-called "Literary Ambulance Drivers", a group of some 24 well-known writers, including the Americans John Dos Passos and E. E. Cummings. During this time, he met Frederick Gerald Haxton, a young San Franciscan, who became his companion and lover until Haxton's death in 1944. Throughout this period, Maugham continued to write. He proofread Of Human Bondage at a location near Dunkirk during a lull in his ambulance duties. Of Human Bondage (1915) initially was criticized in both England and the United States; the New York World described the romantic obsession of the protagonist Philip Carey as "the sentimental servitude of a poor fool". The influential American novelist and critic Theodore Dreiser rescued the novel, referring to it as a work of genius and comparing it to a Beethoven symphony. His review gave the book a lift, and it has never been out of print since. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 19 A Room With A Past
Daisy by W Somerset Maugham | Love Story | Full Unabridged AudioBook
 
01:06:40
http://bit.ly/Dion_Graham_Audio_Books Please watch, full relaxation: "6 Hour Relaxing Piano Music: Rain Sounds, Meditation Music, Relaxing Music, Soft Music, ♫96N" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZnZp8gql2fs -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Daisy by W Somerset Maugham - Listen to full unabridged audiobook online for free on your beloved YouTube! Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MaxAudioBooksDotCom Visit our website: http://MaxAudioBooks.com Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MaxAudioBooks Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MaxAudioBooks Recorded by Librivox.org. If you want to volunteer please visit https://librivox.org/
Views: 4898 Priceless Audiobooks
The Razor's Edge - #MarkoBookClub Ep 1 (Feb 2017)
 
10:22
Let's start with the book I have recommended the most - The Razor's Edge by W. Somerset Maugham. Subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_channel=markoayling Share your insights on the GoodReads discussion forum: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/209122-the-marko-book-club Please support your local bookshops! Upload IG photos with your books and tag using the hashtag #MarkoBookClub! Also available on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2kKrWGr What else should I read? Who should I collaborate with? Please recommend books for me to read with your favorite YouTubers! Happy Reading! Marko
Views: 6400 Marko
W Somerset Maugham
 
00:07
Views: 38 Hidden Wonders
The moon and sixpence. By Somerset Maugham.
 
04:01
You can SUPPORT my channel by donating on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/curious_jane or BTC - 1Cu467T47NUL8Q4aVM3dQhgKJD5Mr2Ddqk "The moon and sixpence" is a book about a well-off stockbroker who abandons his wife and moves to Paris to pursue his passion for painting. Inspired by the life of the painter Paul Gauguin. But compared to the famous artist, the main character is more solitude, more destructive when it comes to his own life. Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5ceZw1iFiDDsSqNlShCp1g?sub_confirmation=1 ~ Curious Jane is both an education and entertaining channel that presents lots of different educational facts that can help you to expand your world outlook ~ ۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰ ~ There are many random facts like historical facts, culture facts that come from different countries, nature facts, scientific facts, facts about animals and much more ~ ۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰ ~ Gain knowledge, broaden your world and mental outlook! Watch our educational videos and have a great time! Lots of educational facts, scientific facts, historical facts, facts about art are here. Curiosity reigns! ツ ~ ۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰۰ ☞ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WittySmithey ☞ Twitter: https://twitter.com/WittySmithey ~~ Link to this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNF6lNuq1Qw ♫♫♫♫♫ Different music genres for true melomans: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC29SjxGObU69AQGgFm8YBkw
Views: 2391 Curious Jane
W. Somerset Maugham - 4/36: Mrs. Craddock
 
14:18
William Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. After losing both his parents by the age of 10, Maugham was raised by a paternal uncle who was emotionally cold. Not wanting to become a lawyer like other men in his family, Maugham eventually trained and qualified as a doctor. The first run of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), sold out so rapidly that Maugham gave up medicine to write full-time. During the First World War, he served with the Red Cross and in the ambulance corps, before being recruited in 1916 into the British Secret Intelligence Service, for which he worked in Switzerland and Russia before the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. During and after the war, he traveled in India and Southeast Asia; all of these experiences were reflected in later short stories and novels. Maugham's father, Robert Ormond Maugham, was a lawyer who handled the legal affairs of the British embassy in Paris. Since French law declared that all children born on French soil could be conscripted for military service, his father arranged for Maugham to be born at the embassy, technically on British soil. His grandfather, another Robert, had also been a prominent lawyer and co-founder of the English Law Society. It was taken for granted that Maugham and his brothers would follow in their footsteps. His elder brother Viscount Maugham enjoyed a distinguished legal career and served as Lord Chancellor from 1938 to 1939. Maugham's mother, Edith Mary (née Snell), had tuberculosis (TB), a condition for which her doctor prescribed childbirth. She had Maugham several years after the last of his three older brothers; they were already enrolled in boarding school by the time he was three. Being the youngest, he was effectively raised as an only child. Edith's sixth and final son died on 25 January 1882, one day after his birth, on Maugham's eighth birthday. Edith died of TB six days later on 31 January at the age of 41. The early death of his mother left Maugham traumatized; he kept his mother's photograph by his bedside for the rest of his life. Two years after Edith's death, Maugham's father died in France of cancer. By 1914, Maugham was famous, with 10 plays produced and 10 novels published. Too old to enlist when the First World War broke out, he served in France as a member of the British Red Cross's so-called "Literary Ambulance Drivers", a group of some 24 well-known writers, including the Americans John Dos Passos and E. E. Cummings. During this time, he met Frederick Gerald Haxton, a young San Franciscan, who became his companion and lover until Haxton's death in 1944. Throughout this period, Maugham continued to write. He proofread Of Human Bondage at a location near Dunkirk during a lull in his ambulance duties. Of Human Bondage (1915) initially was criticized in both England and the United States; the New York World described the romantic obsession of the protagonist Philip Carey as "the sentimental servitude of a poor fool". The influential American novelist and critic Theodore Dreiser rescued the novel, referring to it as a work of genius and comparing it to a Beethoven symphony. His review gave the book a lift, and it has never been out of print since. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ashenden (WS Maugham-BBC 1991) E01 The Dark Woman
 
54:32
Harriet Walter is sensational in the first episode as a temperamental and traitorous artiste coerced into luring her terrorist lover into Ashenden's trap. Ashenden is a BBC1's four part TV series based on the spy novel, Ashenden: Or the British Agent, by W. Somerset Maugham, that aired from 17 November to 8 December 1991, directed by Christopher Morahan, with Alex Jennings in the title role, Joss Ackland as Cumming, Ian Bannen as 'R' and Jason Isaacs as Andrew Lehman. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashenden_(TV_series) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0101040/ For more Ashenden watch Hitchcock’s 1936 picture Secret Agent and the 1950 anthology film Trio Trio: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SweR7qwEMxo
Views: 444 Tirdad Derakhshani
The Bishop's Apron W. Somerset MAUGHAM audiobook
 
06:35:05
The Bishop's Apron W. Somerset MAUGHAM audiobook The Bishop's Apron W. Somerset MAUGHAM (1874 - 1965) "Canon Spratte saw himself as he thought others might see him: mediocre, pompous, self-assertive, verbose." Maugham could have added ambitious, hypocritical, and vain. In this engrossing social satire, Theodore Spratte, a cleric, motivated by an obsessive desire to be elevated to bishop, embellishes his family history and intrudes upon his son's and daughter's courtships. A reviewer in 1906 wrote, "The whole book is an admirable blend of cynical gaiety and broadly farcical comedy; it is the smartest and most genuinely humorous novel that the season has yet given us." -- Lee Smalley Genre(s): Fictional Biographies & Memoirs Language: English w. somerset maugham the bishop's apron w somerset maugham books william somerset maugham w somerset maugham quotes the luncheon by w. somerset maugham w somerset maugham biography somerset maugham biography somerset maugham books w somerset maugham short stories w somerset maugham novels w somerset maugham bibliography w somerset maugham movies rain w somerset maugham william somerset maugham biography w. somerset maugham theatre maugham somerset somerset maugham works somerset maugham novels books by somerset maugham w somerset maugham works william somerset maugham short stories william maugham somerset maugham the painted veil maugham school world famous books bestselling author the magician w somerset maugham w. somerset maugham bio mr. know all by w. somerset maugham somerset maugham stories w. somerset maugham quote somerset maugham plays moon and sixpence maugham cakes and ale maugham short stories by somerset maugham famous novel writers biography of somerset maugham s. maugham the painted veil somerset maugham maugham w. somerset w. somerset maugham wiki best novel writers maugham william somerset about somerset maugham w somerset author somerset maugham biography somerset maugham somerset maugham short biography william somerset maugham works biography of w somerset maugham catalina w somerset maugham w somerset maugham plays the painted veil novel սոմերսեթ մոեմ سومرست somerset maugham painted veil short stories of somerset maugham somerset morn somerset maughn william somerset maugham books the magician maugham mr. know-all w. somerset maugham w. somerset maugham the painted veil william s. maugham ashenden somerset maugham w somerset maugham rain the painted veil by somerset maugham the luncheon w somerset maugham short stories with author maugham novels maugham rain summerset maugham maugham biography rain maugham 1874-1965 short stories somerset maugham painted veil quotes somerset maugham ashenden moem somerset somerset vaughn rain by w. somerset maugham the painted veil w. somerset maugham somerset maugham best books best selling writers the letter maugham somerset moem books famous novel writer best selling short stories best selling novelist biography of author ashenden maugham best somerset maugham books painted veil somerset maugham the most famous writers liza maugham maugham books biography of english writers somerset author biography of the author ws maugham short stories sommerset maughm somerset maugham complete works the verger w somerset maugham best books by somerset maugham maugham the painted veil somerset books maugham writer the painted veil maugham somerset maugham novel stories with author somerset mau collected stories william somerset maugham maugham stories sumerset maugham biography of william maugham ashenden somerset maugham download w s maugham biography best english novel writers the kite by w.somerset maugham popular british writers maugham cakes and ale painted veil maugham somerset moem short stories maugham works maugham painted veil maugham the moon and sixpence painting veil home by w.somerset maugham biography of writer most famous author in the world popular novelist painted veil novel maugham author author maugham maugham somerset biography maugham the magician author of short stories maugham short stories online most popular british authors famous novel writers in the world maugham moon and sixpence popular novel writers the painted veil author short stories writers in english british novel writers maugham summing up theatre by maugham
Views: 1933 Talking Books
The Kite (1948) W.Somerset Maugham
 
01:00:06
From Quartet (1948) Herbert Sunbury has a lifelong enthusiasm for flying kites. Stars:Bernard Lee, George Cole, Hermione Baddeley, Mervyn Johns, Susan Shaw, Cyril Chamberlain, David Cole. Directed by Arthur Crabtree. Screenplay by R.C. Sherriff Based on the short story by W. Somerset Maugham
Views: 5991 Raymond Sojka
Are You a Writer? The Astrology of Author Somerset Maugham
 
08:32
http://divinetimeastrology. Are You a Writer? The Astrology of Author Somerset Maugham Using the Jaimini technique showing the birth chart of Somerset Maugham and how it shows him to be an author. He was a career writer, a playwright and an author of fiction novels, famous for the novels The Razor's Edge and the Painted Veil, both made into movies. Of Human Bondage is another one of his famous novels. See if your birth chart fits any of the Jaimini requirements to being a writer.
Views: 492 DivineTimeAstrology
52 The Web Series: Episode 10 W. Somerset Maugham's The Bum
 
07:52
http://www.runningwildfilms.com - This is the 10th episode of our web series about the making of the 52 short films Running Wild Films is producing in 2013. Every episode features behind the scenes footage, slices of the every day life of the Running Wild crew, and much more. The intro was filmed by Parco Richardson and features the music of AZ band Treasure MammaL. This episode is about the making of W. Somerset Maugham's The Bum. It features actors Travis Mills, Eric Almassy, Rohan Shetty, Steve Wilson, and Tenley Dene. This episode also features our second battle with rainy weather this year. This episode includes the music of Ludwig van Beethoven http://www.facebook.com/runningwildfilms http://www.runningwildfilms.com/
Views: 1135 runningwildfilms
trio 1950 full movie
 
01:31:39
Consisting of three adaptations of W. Somerset Maugham short stories, this film follows the tales of a verger, a jewelry dealer, and the patients of a sanatorium. In the first tale, a verger is ousted from the church by a vicar due to his illiteracy, and seeks to become an entrepreneur. "Mr. Know-All" sees an arrogant jewelry dealer make a bet, with a woman's happiness at stake. The third story, "Sanatorium," explores death, rivalry and love as patients improve their health. Initial release: 1950 Directors: Ken Annakin, Harold French Producer: Antony Darnborough Box office: 147,000 GBP (by 1953) Film series: Quartet Film Series
Views: 392688 Jonathan Kadosh
Alan Hollinghurst Interview: The Secret Life of a Poem
 
30:35
An inspiring conversation with the award-winning English novelist Alan Hollinghurst – noted for his novel ‘The Line of Beauty’ – about being a sort of puppet master to his characters and being characterized as “a gay writer.” “I read poetry obsessively all through my adolescence.” Hollinghurst went to boarding school in an old gothic house in the countryside where the lady of the house was a friend of the Victorian poet Tennyson. Tennyson thus came to influence Hollinghurst’s writing a great deal, poetry being the first thing he wrote. With time, however, he turned to novel writing: “The lovely thing about being a novelist is that you’re in charge and you can sort of just put in whatever you like, and I think I have a tendency to indulge my own enthusiasm.” Hollinghurst enjoys playing with narrative and with what one expects – and having the authority to decide his characters’ fate: “I quite enjoy exercising my power to be sort of cruel and restrictive to my characters… and to bring them to horrible ends.” On writing about homosexuality, the English novelist comments that he initially was able to investigate a relatively unexplored area of fiction: “I know when I started, I felt that there was this opportunity to write about a whole area of subject matter, which hadn’t really been looked at in literary fiction.” Moreover, he felt that there was also a political point in doing so, especially as he started out in the mid-1980s, when the AIDS epidemic broke out, and the social and political change during Margaret Thatcher’s government seemed to allow a more hostile attitude towards homosexuals: “There was all the more point in being upfront and out there about all these things.” Alan Hollinghurst (b. 1954) is a British novelist, poet and short story writer, whose works often evolve around (homo)sexual themes. Hollinghurst is the author of the novels ‘The Swimming Pool Library’ (1988), ‘The Folding Star’ (1994), ‘The Spell’ (1998), ‘The Line of Beauty’ (2004) and ‘The Stranger’s Child’ (2011). He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 1989 Somerset Maugham Award, the 1994 James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the 2004 Man Booker Prize (for ‘The Line of Beauty’). He lives in London, England. Alan Hollinghurst was interviewed by Martin Krasnik at the Louisiana Literature festival at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in August 2012. During the interview Hollinghurst discusses his novel ‘The Stranger’s Child’ (2011). Edited by: Kamilla Bruus Produced by: Christian Lund Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016 FOLLOW US HERE! Website: http://channel.louisiana.dk Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LouisianaChannel Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/louisianachannel Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/LouisianaChann
Views: 105946 Louisiana Channel
W. Somerset Maugham - 11/33: Of Human Bondage
 
52:06
William Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. After losing both his parents by the age of 10, Maugham was raised by a paternal uncle who was emotionally cold. Not wanting to become a lawyer like other men in his family, Maugham eventually trained and qualified as a doctor. The first run of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), sold out so rapidly that Maugham gave up medicine to write full-time. During the First World War, he served with the Red Cross and in the ambulance corps, before being recruited in 1916 into the British Secret Intelligence Service, for which he worked in Switzerland and Russia before the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. During and after the war, he traveled in India and Southeast Asia; all of these experiences were reflected in later short stories and novels. Maugham's father, Robert Ormond Maugham, was a lawyer who handled the legal affairs of the British embassy in Paris. Since French law declared that all children born on French soil could be conscripted for military service, his father arranged for Maugham to be born at the embassy, technically on British soil. His grandfather, another Robert, had also been a prominent lawyer and co-founder of the English Law Society. It was taken for granted that Maugham and his brothers would follow in their footsteps. His elder brother Viscount Maugham enjoyed a distinguished legal career and served as Lord Chancellor from 1938 to 1939. Maugham's mother, Edith Mary (née Snell), had tuberculosis (TB), a condition for which her doctor prescribed childbirth. She had Maugham several years after the last of his three older brothers; they were already enrolled in boarding school by the time he was three. Being the youngest, he was effectively raised as an only child. Edith's sixth and final son died on 25 January 1882, one day after his birth, on Maugham's eighth birthday. Edith died of TB six days later on 31 January at the age of 41. The early death of his mother left Maugham traumatized; he kept his mother's photograph by his bedside for the rest of his life. Two years after Edith's death, Maugham's father died in France of cancer. By 1914, Maugham was famous, with 10 plays produced and 10 novels published. Too old to enlist when the First World War broke out, he served in France as a member of the British Red Cross's so-called "Literary Ambulance Drivers", a group of some 24 well-known writers, including the Americans John Dos Passos and E. E. Cummings. During this time, he met Frederick Gerald Haxton, a young San Franciscan, who became his companion and lover until Haxton's death in 1944. Throughout this period, Maugham continued to write. He proofread Of Human Bondage at a location near Dunkirk during a lull in his ambulance duties. Of Human Bondage (1915) initially was criticized in both England and the United States; the New York World described the romantic obsession of the protagonist Philip Carey as "the sentimental servitude of a poor fool". The influential American novelist and critic Theodore Dreiser rescued the novel, referring to it as a work of genius and comparing it to a Beethoven symphony. His review gave the book a lift, and it has never been out of print since. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Hermetica - Knowledge that will forever change your Life
 
01:03:21
I want to say this one single book brought to my Mind such Knowledge that is has changed me to my Core. I cannot express in mere words for they fail to begin to tell what an impact this knowledge has had on me. If I had to chose a single WORD to express it would be FREEDOM. Freedom on so many different levels and answered so many questions and now I know why this Knowledge was purposely hidden. Join me as we go through each page of this hidden Knowledge and if you are One who has been chosen then this is going to be the best day of your life because from here on out your journey is going to be beyond your wildest expectations so come and join the Others as Knowledge is dispersed. The book The Hermetica is available on Kindle or Amazon. Embrace Free Thinkers! Come be part of the discussion. Thank you for stopping in! Respect everyone Knowledge = Power Ignorance = Enslavement Embrace Free Thinkers If you have an unusual story just email @ [email protected] Join me each Thursday evening on the Artist First radio network for the Steiger Perspective https://www.artistfirst.com/steiger.htm
Views: 11060 R Wayne Steiger
W. Somerset Maugham - 9/33: Of Human Bondage
 
47:56
William Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. After losing both his parents by the age of 10, Maugham was raised by a paternal uncle who was emotionally cold. Not wanting to become a lawyer like other men in his family, Maugham eventually trained and qualified as a doctor. The first run of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), sold out so rapidly that Maugham gave up medicine to write full-time. During the First World War, he served with the Red Cross and in the ambulance corps, before being recruited in 1916 into the British Secret Intelligence Service, for which he worked in Switzerland and Russia before the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. During and after the war, he traveled in India and Southeast Asia; all of these experiences were reflected in later short stories and novels. Maugham's father, Robert Ormond Maugham, was a lawyer who handled the legal affairs of the British embassy in Paris. Since French law declared that all children born on French soil could be conscripted for military service, his father arranged for Maugham to be born at the embassy, technically on British soil. His grandfather, another Robert, had also been a prominent lawyer and co-founder of the English Law Society. It was taken for granted that Maugham and his brothers would follow in their footsteps. His elder brother Viscount Maugham enjoyed a distinguished legal career and served as Lord Chancellor from 1938 to 1939. Maugham's mother, Edith Mary (née Snell), had tuberculosis (TB), a condition for which her doctor prescribed childbirth. She had Maugham several years after the last of his three older brothers; they were already enrolled in boarding school by the time he was three. Being the youngest, he was effectively raised as an only child. Edith's sixth and final son died on 25 January 1882, one day after his birth, on Maugham's eighth birthday. Edith died of TB six days later on 31 January at the age of 41. The early death of his mother left Maugham traumatized; he kept his mother's photograph by his bedside for the rest of his life. Two years after Edith's death, Maugham's father died in France of cancer. By 1914, Maugham was famous, with 10 plays produced and 10 novels published. Too old to enlist when the First World War broke out, he served in France as a member of the British Red Cross's so-called "Literary Ambulance Drivers", a group of some 24 well-known writers, including the Americans John Dos Passos and E. E. Cummings. During this time, he met Frederick Gerald Haxton, a young San Franciscan, who became his companion and lover until Haxton's death in 1944. Throughout this period, Maugham continued to write. He proofread Of Human Bondage at a location near Dunkirk during a lull in his ambulance duties. Of Human Bondage (1915) initially was criticized in both England and the United States; the New York World described the romantic obsession of the protagonist Philip Carey as "the sentimental servitude of a poor fool". The influential American novelist and critic Theodore Dreiser rescued the novel, referring to it as a work of genius and comparing it to a Beethoven symphony. His review gave the book a lift, and it has never been out of print since. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 13 A Room With A Past
[Aleister Crowley-Inspired Occult Fiction] The Magician (Audiobook) by Maugham
 
07:43:45
Somerset Maugham met Crowley in Paris and inspired by the event and wrote this book. The occultist / magician of this book 'Oliver Haddo' was modeled after Crowley and his magical activities. So this is a fascinating book that offers a window to the occult/magic scene of early 20th century. Also many occult books (allegedly) used as source material (that was the accusation of Crowley regarding the book) including 'Kabbalah Unveiled by Christian Knorr von Rosenroth', 'The Life of Paracelsus by Franz Hartmann' and 'Rituel et Dogme de la Haute Magie by Eliphas Levi.' [Occult Fiction Audiobook] The Magician; Inspired by Aleister Crowley, Audiobook, Supernatural, by Somerset Maugham
Views: 5259 Intellectual Exercise
W. Somerset Maugham - 8/33: Of Human Bondage
 
50:39
William Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. After losing both his parents by the age of 10, Maugham was raised by a paternal uncle who was emotionally cold. Not wanting to become a lawyer like other men in his family, Maugham eventually trained and qualified as a doctor. The first run of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), sold out so rapidly that Maugham gave up medicine to write full-time. During the First World War, he served with the Red Cross and in the ambulance corps, before being recruited in 1916 into the British Secret Intelligence Service, for which he worked in Switzerland and Russia before the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. During and after the war, he traveled in India and Southeast Asia; all of these experiences were reflected in later short stories and novels. Maugham's father, Robert Ormond Maugham, was a lawyer who handled the legal affairs of the British embassy in Paris. Since French law declared that all children born on French soil could be conscripted for military service, his father arranged for Maugham to be born at the embassy, technically on British soil. His grandfather, another Robert, had also been a prominent lawyer and co-founder of the English Law Society. It was taken for granted that Maugham and his brothers would follow in their footsteps. His elder brother Viscount Maugham enjoyed a distinguished legal career and served as Lord Chancellor from 1938 to 1939. Maugham's mother, Edith Mary (née Snell), had tuberculosis (TB), a condition for which her doctor prescribed childbirth. She had Maugham several years after the last of his three older brothers; they were already enrolled in boarding school by the time he was three. Being the youngest, he was effectively raised as an only child. Edith's sixth and final son died on 25 January 1882, one day after his birth, on Maugham's eighth birthday. Edith died of TB six days later on 31 January at the age of 41. The early death of his mother left Maugham traumatized; he kept his mother's photograph by his bedside for the rest of his life. Two years after Edith's death, Maugham's father died in France of cancer. By 1914, Maugham was famous, with 10 plays produced and 10 novels published. Too old to enlist when the First World War broke out, he served in France as a member of the British Red Cross's so-called "Literary Ambulance Drivers", a group of some 24 well-known writers, including the Americans John Dos Passos and E. E. Cummings. During this time, he met Frederick Gerald Haxton, a young San Franciscan, who became his companion and lover until Haxton's death in 1944. Throughout this period, Maugham continued to write. He proofread Of Human Bondage at a location near Dunkirk during a lull in his ambulance duties. Of Human Bondage (1915) initially was criticized in both England and the United States; the New York World described the romantic obsession of the protagonist Philip Carey as "the sentimental servitude of a poor fool". The influential American novelist and critic Theodore Dreiser rescued the novel, referring to it as a work of genius and comparing it to a Beethoven symphony. His review gave the book a lift, and it has never been out of print since. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 16 A Room With A Past
W. Somerset Maugham - 7/33: Of Human Bondage
 
44:08
William Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. After losing both his parents by the age of 10, Maugham was raised by a paternal uncle who was emotionally cold. Not wanting to become a lawyer like other men in his family, Maugham eventually trained and qualified as a doctor. The first run of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), sold out so rapidly that Maugham gave up medicine to write full-time. During the First World War, he served with the Red Cross and in the ambulance corps, before being recruited in 1916 into the British Secret Intelligence Service, for which he worked in Switzerland and Russia before the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. During and after the war, he traveled in India and Southeast Asia; all of these experiences were reflected in later short stories and novels. Maugham's father, Robert Ormond Maugham, was a lawyer who handled the legal affairs of the British embassy in Paris. Since French law declared that all children born on French soil could be conscripted for military service, his father arranged for Maugham to be born at the embassy, technically on British soil. His grandfather, another Robert, had also been a prominent lawyer and co-founder of the English Law Society. It was taken for granted that Maugham and his brothers would follow in their footsteps. His elder brother Viscount Maugham enjoyed a distinguished legal career and served as Lord Chancellor from 1938 to 1939. Maugham's mother, Edith Mary (née Snell), had tuberculosis (TB), a condition for which her doctor prescribed childbirth. She had Maugham several years after the last of his three older brothers; they were already enrolled in boarding school by the time he was three. Being the youngest, he was effectively raised as an only child. Edith's sixth and final son died on 25 January 1882, one day after his birth, on Maugham's eighth birthday. Edith died of TB six days later on 31 January at the age of 41. The early death of his mother left Maugham traumatized; he kept his mother's photograph by his bedside for the rest of his life. Two years after Edith's death, Maugham's father died in France of cancer. By 1914, Maugham was famous, with 10 plays produced and 10 novels published. Too old to enlist when the First World War broke out, he served in France as a member of the British Red Cross's so-called "Literary Ambulance Drivers", a group of some 24 well-known writers, including the Americans John Dos Passos and E. E. Cummings. During this time, he met Frederick Gerald Haxton, a young San Franciscan, who became his companion and lover until Haxton's death in 1944. Throughout this period, Maugham continued to write. He proofread Of Human Bondage at a location near Dunkirk during a lull in his ambulance duties. Of Human Bondage (1915) initially was criticized in both England and the United States; the New York World described the romantic obsession of the protagonist Philip Carey as "the sentimental servitude of a poor fool". The influential American novelist and critic Theodore Dreiser rescued the novel, referring to it as a work of genius and comparing it to a Beethoven symphony. His review gave the book a lift, and it has never been out of print since. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 12 A Room With A Past
W. Somerset Maugham - Rain (part 2)
 
26:47
William Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. After losing both his parents by the age of 10, Maugham was raised by a paternal uncle who was emotionally cold. Not wanting to become a lawyer like other men in his family, Maugham eventually trained and qualified as a doctor. The first run of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), sold out so rapidly that Maugham gave up medicine to write full-time. During the First World War, he served with the Red Cross and in the ambulance corps, before being recruited in 1916 into the British Secret Intelligence Service, for which he worked in Switzerland and Russia before the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. During and after the war, he traveled in India and Southeast Asia; all of these experiences were reflected in later short stories and novels. Maugham's father, Robert Ormond Maugham, was a lawyer who handled the legal affairs of the British embassy in Paris. Since French law declared that all children born on French soil could be conscripted for military service, his father arranged for Maugham to be born at the embassy, technically on British soil. His grandfather, another Robert, had also been a prominent lawyer and co-founder of the English Law Society. It was taken for granted that Maugham and his brothers would follow in their footsteps. His elder brother Viscount Maugham enjoyed a distinguished legal career and served as Lord Chancellor from 1938 to 1939. Maugham's mother, Edith Mary (née Snell), had tuberculosis (TB), a condition for which her doctor prescribed childbirth. She had Maugham several years after the last of his three older brothers; they were already enrolled in boarding school by the time he was three. Being the youngest, he was effectively raised as an only child. Edith's sixth and final son died on 25 January 1882, one day after his birth, on Maugham's eighth birthday. Edith died of TB six days later on 31 January at the age of 41. The early death of his mother left Maugham traumatized; he kept his mother's photograph by his bedside for the rest of his life. Two years after Edith's death, Maugham's father died in France of cancer. By 1914, Maugham was famous, with 10 plays produced and 10 novels published. Too old to enlist when the First World War broke out, he served in France as a member of the British Red Cross's so-called "Literary Ambulance Drivers", a group of some 24 well-known writers, including the Americans John Dos Passos and E. E. Cummings. During this time, he met Frederick Gerald Haxton, a young San Franciscan, who became his companion and lover until Haxton's death in 1944. Throughout this period, Maugham continued to write. He proofread Of Human Bondage at a location near Dunkirk during a lull in his ambulance duties. Of Human Bondage (1915) initially was criticized in both England and the United States; the New York World described the romantic obsession of the protagonist Philip Carey as "the sentimental servitude of a poor fool". The influential American novelist and critic Theodore Dreiser rescued the novel, referring to it as a work of genius and comparing it to a Beethoven symphony. His review gave the book a lift, and it has never been out of print since. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 11 A Room With A Past
W. Somerset Maugham - 24/33: Of Human Bondage
 
45:10
William Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. After losing both his parents by the age of 10, Maugham was raised by a paternal uncle who was emotionally cold. Not wanting to become a lawyer like other men in his family, Maugham eventually trained and qualified as a doctor. The first run of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), sold out so rapidly that Maugham gave up medicine to write full-time. During the First World War, he served with the Red Cross and in the ambulance corps, before being recruited in 1916 into the British Secret Intelligence Service, for which he worked in Switzerland and Russia before the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. During and after the war, he traveled in India and Southeast Asia; all of these experiences were reflected in later short stories and novels. Maugham's father, Robert Ormond Maugham, was a lawyer who handled the legal affairs of the British embassy in Paris. Since French law declared that all children born on French soil could be conscripted for military service, his father arranged for Maugham to be born at the embassy, technically on British soil. His grandfather, another Robert, had also been a prominent lawyer and co-founder of the English Law Society. It was taken for granted that Maugham and his brothers would follow in their footsteps. His elder brother Viscount Maugham enjoyed a distinguished legal career and served as Lord Chancellor from 1938 to 1939. Maugham's mother, Edith Mary (née Snell), had tuberculosis (TB), a condition for which her doctor prescribed childbirth. She had Maugham several years after the last of his three older brothers; they were already enrolled in boarding school by the time he was three. Being the youngest, he was effectively raised as an only child. Edith's sixth and final son died on 25 January 1882, one day after his birth, on Maugham's eighth birthday. Edith died of TB six days later on 31 January at the age of 41. The early death of his mother left Maugham traumatized; he kept his mother's photograph by his bedside for the rest of his life. Two years after Edith's death, Maugham's father died in France of cancer. By 1914, Maugham was famous, with 10 plays produced and 10 novels published. Too old to enlist when the First World War broke out, he served in France as a member of the British Red Cross's so-called "Literary Ambulance Drivers", a group of some 24 well-known writers, including the Americans John Dos Passos and E. E. Cummings. During this time, he met Frederick Gerald Haxton, a young San Franciscan, who became his companion and lover until Haxton's death in 1944. Throughout this period, Maugham continued to write. He proofread Of Human Bondage at a location near Dunkirk during a lull in his ambulance duties. Of Human Bondage (1915) initially was criticized in both England and the United States; the New York World described the romantic obsession of the protagonist Philip Carey as "the sentimental servitude of a poor fool". The influential American novelist and critic Theodore Dreiser rescued the novel, referring to it as a work of genius and comparing it to a Beethoven symphony. His review gave the book a lift, and it has never been out of print since. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
W. Somerset Maugham - 1/36: Mrs. Craddock
 
19:14
William Somerset Maugham (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s. After losing both his parents by the age of 10, Maugham was raised by a paternal uncle who was emotionally cold. Not wanting to become a lawyer like other men in his family, Maugham eventually trained and qualified as a doctor. The first run of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), sold out so rapidly that Maugham gave up medicine to write full-time. During the First World War, he served with the Red Cross and in the ambulance corps, before being recruited in 1916 into the British Secret Intelligence Service, for which he worked in Switzerland and Russia before the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. During and after the war, he traveled in India and Southeast Asia; all of these experiences were reflected in later short stories and novels. Maugham's father, Robert Ormond Maugham, was a lawyer who handled the legal affairs of the British embassy in Paris. Since French law declared that all children born on French soil could be conscripted for military service, his father arranged for Maugham to be born at the embassy, technically on British soil. His grandfather, another Robert, had also been a prominent lawyer and co-founder of the English Law Society. It was taken for granted that Maugham and his brothers would follow in their footsteps. His elder brother Viscount Maugham enjoyed a distinguished legal career and served as Lord Chancellor from 1938 to 1939. Maugham's mother, Edith Mary (née Snell), had tuberculosis (TB), a condition for which her doctor prescribed childbirth. She had Maugham several years after the last of his three older brothers; they were already enrolled in boarding school by the time he was three. Being the youngest, he was effectively raised as an only child. Edith's sixth and final son died on 25 January 1882, one day after his birth, on Maugham's eighth birthday. Edith died of TB six days later on 31 January at the age of 41. The early death of his mother left Maugham traumatized; he kept his mother's photograph by his bedside for the rest of his life. Two years after Edith's death, Maugham's father died in France of cancer. By 1914, Maugham was famous, with 10 plays produced and 10 novels published. Too old to enlist when the First World War broke out, he served in France as a member of the British Red Cross's so-called "Literary Ambulance Drivers", a group of some 24 well-known writers, including the Americans John Dos Passos and E. E. Cummings. During this time, he met Frederick Gerald Haxton, a young San Franciscan, who became his companion and lover until Haxton's death in 1944. Throughout this period, Maugham continued to write. He proofread Of Human Bondage at a location near Dunkirk during a lull in his ambulance duties. Of Human Bondage (1915) initially was criticized in both England and the United States; the New York World described the romantic obsession of the protagonist Philip Carey as "the sentimental servitude of a poor fool". The influential American novelist and critic Theodore Dreiser rescued the novel, referring to it as a work of genius and comparing it to a Beethoven symphony. His review gave the book a lift, and it has never been out of print since. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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