Home
Videos uploaded by user “Minute Book Reports”
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
03:20
This is a quick book summary and analysis for Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a man named Guy Montag who is a fireman. He's not a fireman by today's standards though. Instead of putting out fires, he starts them by burning books, which are outlawed by the government. After talking to his neighbor, Clarisse, Guy begins to question his work. He looks around and sees a wife who doesn't love him and an entire society caught up in technology and war. People kill each other every day and no one seems to care. After learning that Clarisse died, Guy further begins to question whether or not he is doing the right thing by burning books. So much so, that he steals a book before burning a lady and pile of books. His fire captain, Beatty, notices changes in Guy and watches him carefully. Guy reveals to his wife that he's had a small collection of books in their house and they try to read them together, but his wife is disinterested. Guy meets an old English professor, Faber, and they decide to fight the government. Meanwhile, when Guy is at work, they get an alarm that books have been discovered. Surprisingly, the firemen end up at Guy's house. Guy is forced to burn all of his books with a flamethrower, but then kills Beatty when provoked. He grabs what books he can and runs to Faber's house for a last goodbye. The government has a full televised search for Guy, even using a mechanical search dog to track him. Guy makes it out of the city and travels down the river, where he meets a group of runaways. There, he learns that they all have memorized books, a human library of literature. In the end, the runaways see the city being destroyed by enemy bombs and prepare for the grim future. So why does this society not like books? What did book ever do to people? In this society, people have chosen to not read books. It's that simple. The majority of people stopped reading and instead wanted entertainment with bite-sized portions of educational information. From there, the government decided that books should be banned because books contained conflicting ideas that brought about arguments and conflicts. So rather than have a marketplace of ideas, the government wanted to streamline thinking so that everyone thought the same way. And what's scary is that this doesn't seem too farfetched to happen in real life. Most importantly, this story tries to answer the question: Why are books so important? As Faber discusses with Guy, books are valuable for three reasons. The first is that books hold quality information. The second reason is that books require time to read them, a commitment. And the third reason is that we have the ability to react to our world based on what we, as readers, gain from the read material. That the words in books are not just lifeless words, but carry meaning that has real life application in our lives. It's not just that this old dead guy wrote some things for me to have to read hundreds of years later, but how do those words apply to our society today? Even though technology has advanced our world, we still tend to see the same human problems from the past, so it seems that technology makes our lives easier, but doesn't really solve many of our most basic problems, like war, disease, and poverty. It is quite scary how the author could have imagined some of the technology that we find ourselves using today. In the story, the society has fast cars, mechanical dogs, large TV screens, reality TV, bluetooth, and a host of other technologies. It makes you wonder how far we are from a world without books. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 128747 Minute Book Reports
Animal Farm by George Orwell (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
04:40
This is a quick book summary and analysis of Animal Farm by George Orwell. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. New Minute Book Reports are posted every week. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 (The transcript was too long to post in the description. Use closed captions if you'd like the transcript.) Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 172747 Minute Book Reports
Young Goodman Brown by Nathaniel Hawthorne (Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
01:51
This is a quick summary and analysis for Young Goodman Brown by Hawthorne. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about newly wed Goodman Brown, a religious and pious man, setting off on a journey into the forest. He leaves behind his wife, Faith. He meets a man, the devil, in the woods, who talks with him as they continue on a path. As they walk, they come across people that Goodman Brown knows and respects. They are all, however, on their way to a devil meeting. Goodman Brown is shocked, but remains calm. Then he finds out his wife is going to the meeting and flips out. He decides to join his wife in the conversion. The two of them are baptized by the devil before all of the devil-worshiping townspeople when...Goodman Brown wakes up. It was all a dream. However, he begins to look at everyone in town differently, with more cynicism and bitterness. Ultimately, he dies a spiritually dead man. The moral of the story is: people aren't who they seem they are. On the surface, Hawthorne presents a story about a man and his faith, because the wife's name is also Faith. See what he did there? We know that the marriage between man and woman, or man and his faith, is fairly new, only three months, which makes sense as to why Goodman Brown is so shaken up. The wilderness also is important to note, as it creates a separation between Civilization and the "Wild." This Wild is associated not only with demonic attributes, but also those of the Indian (Native American) culture, a pretty common attitude at the time. The ending of the story is questionable, as our hero becomes an anti-hero. But that's okay because not every story ends happily ever after. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 57891 Minute Book Reports
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
02:19
This is a quick book summary and analysis of The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about three brothers who live with each other after their parents were killed in an accident. Darry is the oldest and works as a roofer. Sodapop is the middle child who is handsome and works at a gas station. And Ponyboy is the youngest, a smart kid trying to grow up. The town they live in is socially divided in two. The greasers are the poor kids who wear leather jackets and oil their hair. The socials, or Socs, are the rich kids who have nice cars and clothes. These two groups are constantly fighting. The three brothers are greasers and hang out with some of the greasers in the city. Dallas is a wild New Yorker who hates authority and Johnny is a quiet kid who gets beat by his father. After meeting a couple of Soc girls, Ponyboy and Johnny get attacked by a group of socs. Ponyboy is about to die in the fight, but Johnny stabs one of the socs and the rest run. In a panic, Ponyboy and Johnny run to the country and hide. Ponyboy and Johnny stay at an abandoned church in the countryside until Dallas comes to get them. However, the church they were staying at catches on fire and some of the local kids are trapped in the building. Ponyboy and Johnny go into the burning building and rescue them, but both are hurt. They are admitted to a hospital, where they are declared heroes. Meanwhile, the socs and greasers are planning a big rumble to settling things. Both gangs line up and fight each other. The greasers win. However, Johnny dies from his injuries from the fire and Dallas gets himself shot by the police. Ponyboy is acquitted of all charges for the slaying of the one soc and the three brothers grow closer together. The underlying theme of social class and the division that social classes create is important. This isn't quite the Capulet and Montague setup we get in Romeo and Juliet, but it's something more relatable to contemporary readers. Money does divide people. Poor people tend to live in a certain part of an area, while the rich people live in another. The story tries to present the troubled relationship between Ponyboy and Darry as the central conflict, that these two brothers hate each other. However, readers will find that his conflict with Darry is weak and forced. Rather, Ponyboy's realization that both greasers and socs are just regular people is noteworthy. This is something that all readers can take away, no matter what age. Society likes to classify who we are and compartmentalizes us into categories and groups. And while those groups may be important in economic and census studies, the people in those groups become identity-less. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 67897 Minute Book Reports
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
04:32
This is a quick book summary and analysis of The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. New Minute Book Reports are posted every week. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 The transcript of this Minute Book Report is too long for the description. Please refer to the captions for transcript. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 52013 Minute Book Reports
The Pearl by John Steinbeck (Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
03:29
This is a quick summary and analysis of The Pearl by John Steinbeck. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a man named Kino, a poor pearl diver who lives with his wife, Juana, and their newborn, Coyotito. One night, a scorpion stings Coyotito as he is sleeping. Despite Juana's attempts to suck out the poison, the baby screams and needs medical attention. Kino and his family walk to the nearest doctor to request aid, but the doctor refuses to help them because they are poor. To help pay for the doctor's services, Kino goes pearl diving in hopes to find a pearl that will get them the money they need. As he dives, he sees a large oyster and brings it back to his boat. After opening it, he discovers a large pearl, which he deems "The Pearl of the World." The town quickly celebrates this discovery, but then Kino becomes paranoid and suspicious of his neighbors. In fact, at night, he fights off intruders who try to steal the pearl. Kino walks into town to sell the pearl to the pearl dealers. However, the pearl dealers try to lowball him, saying that the pearl is so big that no one will want it. Kino begins to doubt the pearl's worth, but decides to sell it at the capitol himself. That evening, Juana tries to dispose of the pearl, but Kino stops her. However, there is a mysterious attacker that tries to steal the pearl. In the struggle, Kino kills the man. Returning to the village, they find that their home has been ransacked and destroyed. Panicked, Kino decides they must travel quickly to the capitol before more people try to attack them. They go through the mountains, but realize that they are being followed by three men, two trackers and a man on horse with a gun. Realizing that the trackers will eventually catch up to them, Kino decides that he must kill the men. He sneaks up on them, but then hears Coyotito crying in the distance. The man with the gun fires a shot in the direction of the crying and Kino takes that opportunity to attack the men. He kills them all. In the end, Kino and Juana return to the village with a dead Coyotito, who suffered a gunshot to the head, and toss the pearl back into the ocean. First, readers will discover that the characters in the story are connected through music, not just to each other, but to nature. Kino and Juana note that everything has a song. And while there are physical things in this world that create sound and music, like birds, not everything makes sounds, yet Kino still can "hear" their songs. So it seems that the music or song that each thing resonates is more figurative than literal. People can often create connections on an emotional level with objects and people, a parallel similar to the connectivity of music. As demonstrated through Kino's own struggle with greed, readers, too, must wrestle with this vice. The author sets forth an interesting idea: It is human nature that if we are given one thing, we will always want more. That the greed to consume is in our nature. However, the author also suggests that it is perhaps this greed that truly separates humans from all other animals. And it is this commentary on our appetites, both for sustenance and material things, that is noteworthy. Perhaps greed is good? Lastly, there is an emphasis on the power of reading and education. Throughout the story, Kino hopes that his son will be given the opportunity to learn to read because he recognizes the disadvantage of being uneducated and ignorant in a society where knowledge is power. For their poor town, anything that is told to them must be taken as the truth, as there is no way for them to confirm or check if what they are being told is true or not. If the pearl buyers say that the market for pearls is bad, the pearl divers must believe them and sell their stock at lower prices. So too, readers should recognize that ignorance is more detrimental than for its own sake. Without access to knowledge, whether through self or others, the world becomes a dark place. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 96235 Minute Book Reports
The Giver by Lois Lowry (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
02:00
This is a quick book summary and analysis of The Giver by Lois Lowry. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a boy named Jonas who lives in a somewhat sheltered community. Jonas lives with his Father, a newborn caretaker, his Mother, a judge of some kind, and his younger sister, Lily, an imaginative girl who asks a lot of questions. This community regards age as extremely important, tracking each boy and girl with various labels based on their age. Because Jonas is turning twelve, he will be assigned his job. And while his friends and peers are assigned regular jobs in the community, he is selected to be The Receiver, a prestigious position that must learn and keep the memories of the past. He begins training with the previous Receiver, The Giver. The Giver is an old man who is wise and tired. The Giver begins transferring memories from the past to Jonas through touch. At first this is exciting because he experiences things like snow and color, which are absent from this community. However, The Giver then transfers memories of pain and other negative images, which hurt Jonas. After contemplating what to do with this knowledge, Jonas decides to take a newborn, Gabriel, with him and run from the community. He eventually makes it to society, where he is greeted by the sight of brightly decorated homes. And while there are elements of the supernatural - the passing of memories - the somewhat utopian/dystopian society established in the story is a topic of important discussion. The community in the story feels no sense of emotion, color, feeling, or remorse. And while our current society is not as blatant in these absences, we can, still today, feel the lack of those same things. Color seems to be an important characteristic in this story. The majority of the community sees the world in a literal and figurative gray tone. Also, the use of red appears several times in the story - the apple, a girl's hair, flowers. This story presents a scary scenario where a community decides the lifestyle of individuals and individuals have no real choice. Does it sound familiar? Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 76659 Minute Book Reports
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson (Review) - Minute Book Report
 
02:00
This is a book summary and analysis of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about Mr. Utterson, a lawyer in charge of the will of a prominent doctor named Henry Jekyll. As the keeper of the doctor's will, he becomes curious as to why all of Jekyll's money will go to a Mr. Hyde, a rumored murderer. In fact, Mr. Utterson is told a story about Hyde tackling a girl and murdering a government official. Mr. Utterson tries to ask Jekyll who Hyde is, but Jekyll refuses to go into details. Mr. Utterson then tries to talk to Hyde, but Hyde runs away. One night, Mr. Utterson is called to Jekyll's house by a servant who thinks he hears screaming coming from Jekyll's room. They investigate and find Hyde dead with Jekyll missing. Mr. Utterson reads a series of letters that reveals that Jekyll and Hyde were the same person. Because "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" as a phrase is referenced so much in our society, it's hard to get any surprise out of this story today. But I'm sure for readers back then, this twist was incredible as it was hard to imagine that a single person could literally be two people. The last chapter of the story is the most profound, as we get Jekyll's confession letter as to how and why he did this. In his letter, he reveals that by drinking a potion, he could transform into Hyde, which was both a liberating and scary experience. Unfortunately for Jekyll, the potion started out as a way of bringing Hyde to life. But in the end, the potion was the only way to bring Jekyll back. Through Hyde, Jekyll could act any way he wanted without any of the responsibility, sort of like an online avatar. And as to why Hyde was deformed, it was because Jekyll's evil side was so underdeveloped, nevertheless still present. This story brings to light the idea that we all have a good and evil side. Each day, we choose which side we want to let out and we constantly struggle to keep the evil in. More importantly though, Jekyll declares that it was a choice. A choice to be good or a choice to be evil. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 107079 Minute Book Reports
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
03:31
This is a quick book summary and analysis of The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a young man named Henry who wants to fight for the Union in the Civil War. He leaves his mother behind and finds himself in a company of friends and strangers. This group of soldiers does a lot of training and marching, but initially doesn't really see a lot of action. At most, they've seen battles in the distance and have seen the wounded in passing. Henry is nervous about actually fighting and is ashamed that he feels that way. However, after he talks to some of the other soldiers, he realizes that many of them are also nervous. The company finally gets their big break and they are assigned to hold a line against the Confederates. They survive the initial charge and cheer at their first small victory as a group. However, in the second Confederate charge, Henry gets overwhelmed and begins to run away. He runs so far that he is driven to the general giving orders at the back lines. Apparently, they held the line and it was a victory. Feeling ashamed that he ran away, Henry walks around the battlefield for a while. He finds that one of his friends is dying and watches him as he takes his last breath. He also gets hit in the head when he tries to talk to a group of passing soldiers. He eventually meets up with his old company and they greet him because they thought he was dead. The doctor treats Henry's head wound and he gets a good night's rest. In the morning, the men feel good and are volunteered to charge the Confederate line, in which not many will survive. Henry, feeling cowardly, suddenly gains courage and leads the charge, picking up the Union flag. They celebrate the victory. However, after the fight, Henry realizes that they only charged a very short distance, even though it had felt like hundreds of yards. Some of the officers see Henry's heroics and commemorate him as being brave. They charge the Confederate lines a couple more times, accumulating more casualties and wounded. In the end, Henry becomes a true veteran. The author purposely uses ambiguity in references to the Civil War, which is both beneficial and detrimental. By not providing the specific name of the battlefield, we get a sense that this battle is everywhere and all-encompassing. From the description of the vastness of the battlefield, the fighting seems to be going on in all directions, adding to the sizable scope of this war. However, it also creates a disconnect to the history of the Civil War and loses a lot of what could strengthen it to make it more of historical fiction. Granted, this story was written and published quite some time ago, but in contemporary times, after we have a general understanding of the Civil War, the ambiguity can make readers wonder, "Where exactly does this fit in to my understanding of the Civil War?" The changes that Henry goes through make this story a coming of age story. He enters the army as a young man and, after several battles, leaves a real man. Before he sees his first action, we see him battling with feelings of insecurity and cowardice. But it's interesting to note that once he gets a good taste of battle, he almost seems to be battling emotions of vigor and over-ambition, like he has to hold himself back from charging the enemy by himself. So what is the red badge of courage? The badge is obviously symbolic, but it turns out that the badge is red because of the men's blood. It's similar to dirty vs. clean football uniforms. The more dirty the uniform, the more that player has played. The guys with the clean uniforms are usually the guys just watching. When Henry returns to the battlefield after running away, he sees all of the wounded and wishes that he too could have been wounded, as it would have shown a sign of courage for staying in the fight. And by the end, after his courageous charge and wounds, he earns his own red badge of courage. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 27772 Minute Book Reports
The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien (Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
02:25
This is a quick summary and analysis of one of the chapters in The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about Lieutenant Jimmy Cross, the leading officer of a band of soldiers in the Vietnam War. The lieutenant is in love with a girl named Martha who is back home attending college. He carries a couple of pictures and letters that she's sent. The group comes across a tunnel and they draw numbers to see who has to go in to check it out. As the unlucky soldier is checking out the tunnel, the rest of the men are relaxed, just standing around. Lieutenant Cross is daydreaming about Martha. One of the men returns from urinating and gets shot in the head. The men regroup, strip the dead soldier of his gear, and call for a chopper to take him out. As they are waiting, Lieutenant Cross digs a hole and cries, blaming himself for the soldier's death. After the body is taken away, the lieutenant burns the letters and pictures, vowing to never get distracted again. Rather than writing the story in a linear fashion, the author talks about the things the men carry as a way of telling the story. Descriptions of the things each of the men carry is given, which adds specificity, detail, and personality to each character. More importantly, the author breaks down what each man carries by purpose. Whether it be necessity, field speciality, mission, or superstition, the things they carry are compartmentalized into groups, which the author then uses to reveal more about each character and the central plot. The transformation of Lieutenant Cross from a lovesick young man to a hardened commanding officer is slow, but steady. At first Cross is reading Martha's letters each night and imagines what she is doing. However, Cross begins to doubt Martha's love for him. And it is this distraction that results in the death of the soldier. So it isn't so much that Cross is thinking about Martha. Rather, it is the doubting distraction that results in the death of the soldier. Weight is also discussed in this story, both literally and figuratively. The things the men carry all have a physical weight, which the author includes to add more detail to the item. However, as the author continuously mentions the weight of the items, readers should begin to realize how heavy the weight is of the things they are actually carrying. This intensifies when the author then introduces the figurative weight of emotions and responsibility that these men also carry. These men carry the land, the sky, their own lives, shame, reputations. This emotional baggage, which has no physical weight, has emotional weight that may, in some cases, be more heavy than physical things. It is not until the men are flown out of Vietnam - that they become the objects being carried - that their burdens are lifted. And even then, it is never gone. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 66476 Minute Book Reports
The Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck (Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
02:13
This is a quick summary and analysis of The Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a woman named Elisa who lives on a farm with her husband. Her husband has just sold cattle to some businessmen and he wants to take her out to celebrate after he delivers the cattle. Elisa tends a small garden near the house and grows amazing chrysanthemums. She claims to have a planter's hand, a feel for when flowers need to be trimmed and budded. A traveler drives up the road and identifies himself as a repairman of sorts. He can sharpen knives and fix dented pots. He asks Elisa if she needs anything to be fixed, but she says no. He talks about his travels and lifestyle, which Elisa secretly wishes she had. He then sees that she has a garden and asks about it. Elisa gets excited that the man is interested in her flowers and explains that she has a planter's hand. She gives him some of her chrysanthemum sprouts to grow. Eventually the man leaves and her husband returns. She gets dressed up and the husband notices how pretty she looks. She takes offense, claiming that she has always been strong. As they head down the road, she sees the chrysanthemum sprouts that she had given to the traveler on the side of the road. Then she cries. Gender roles are an important issue in this story. The initial description of Elisa is of a woman covered by the farming clothes of a man. Her overalls and hat are men's clothing, which de-feminizes her as a woman, hiding the features that make her a woman. At the same time, she is not quite a man either, as she can only look on as her husband makes the cattle sale with the other businessmen. The traveler is also an interesting character. He is given no name. All we know is that he travels by wagon from Seattle to San Diego and fixes things along the way. He gave Elisa the attention that she so craved. However, seeing that he just threw away the chrysanthemum sprouts on the side of the road, it shows how phony his intentions were. In fact, his profession, as a fixer and sharpener of tools, is reflective of his character. The tools that he sharpens will eventually all become dull again, as will the fixed pots getting more dents as time passes. And it seems that for a moment he helped to fix whatever was missing in Elisa's life, but like his sharpening and fixing of appliances, those fixes were only temporary or fake. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 29581 Minute Book Reports
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime by Mark Haddon (Book Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
02:12
This is a quick book summary of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime by Mark Haddon. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Transcript: This is a story about a boy named Christopher who lives with his father in Swindon, England. Christopher has a behavioral disability, yet he is very intelligent and observant and hopes to pass his advanced math exams. He is told that his mother passed away due to a heart attack and attends a special school of children with special needs. One night, he discovers a neighbor’s dog, Wellington, with a garden fork stuck through him. After the owner, Mrs. Shears, discovers Christopher over the dead dog’s body and calls the police, Christopher gets arrested. He wants to figure out who killed the dog so he begins writing in a notebook given to him by his teacher, Mrs. Siobhan. Christopher begins by going around the neighborhood and asking people questions. However, he isn’t successful with the questioning and his father tells him to stop. Furthermore, his father becomes very upset with him and assaults Christopher after discovering that he learns about his mother’s affair with Mr. Shears. After his father takes away his notebook, Christopher looks for it in the house, only to discover a series of letters addressed to him from his mother. In the letters, he learns that his mother left them for Mr. Shear and that she is alive and working in London. The news makes Christopher sick. Christopher decides to run away and live with his mother in London. He goes to the train station, buys a ticket, and boards a train. Just as the train leaves, a policeman sees him and tries to get him off the train. The train leaves the station and so the policeman decides to escort Christopher off the train at the next stop to take him back to the police station where his father is waiting. However, Christopher manages to hide in the train and he eventually arrives in London. Christopher eventually gets to his mother’s house and his mother is surprised to see him. He explains why he never wrote back and is invited to stay with his mother and Mr. Shears. Christopher’s father arrives the next day and they all argue over who Christopher will live with. Christopher chooses his mother and so his father leaves. However, over the next couple of days, his mother and Mr. Shears begin fighting. This results in Christopher and his mother moving back to Swindon. Christopher and his mother move into a small apartment and Christopher spends some time with his father. To make things better, Christopher’s father gives him a dog. In the end, Christopher passes his math exams and his relationship with his father slowly becomes restored. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. Music: "As We Go" from the Youtube Audio Library.
Views: 31964 Minute Book Reports
1984 by George Orwell (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
03:16
This is a quick book summary and analysis of 1984 by George Orwell. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about Winston Smith, a middle-aged man who lives in Oceania, a collection of countries that form one of the three superpowers in the world. He is stationed in dreary London, working as a clerk for the Ministry of Truth under Big Brother, the overruling party of Oceania. His job is to update all text, like books, newspapers, speeches, etc., to match whatever the party deems as correct. Winston, however, is unhappy. He keeps a secret diary and writes in it frequently, expressing his frustrations with how life is. He takes caution from the Thought Police, a police-like group who use telescreens to view any suspicious activity from potential troublemakers. One day at work, Winston notices a dark haired woman named Julia. She's young and beautiful with a hint of mystery. She slips him a secret note, saying that she loves him. The two meet up and engage in a physical and romantic relationship, of course forbidden by Big Brother and the party since intimacy is only for procreation, if that. With the permission of an antique shop owner, the couple use the shop for their secret meetups. The couple even meet with another one of Winston's coworkers and talk about The Brotherhood, a secret resistance organization trying to dismantle Big Brother. However, it's a setup and Winston and Julia are taken in for questioning. During the interrogation, Winston faces his greatest fear: rats. They put a cage of rats on his head and he begins to panic. In terror, he declares that he wishes the punishment be given to Julia instead of him. He is broken. In the end, Winston is a shell of a man, broken and sheepish, believing what Big Brother tells him, that two plus two equals five. First and foremost, 1984 portrays a dystopian society, a society overly controlled by an oligarchical government, where a few powerful people make the rules for all. In essence, it's about power and control. To do this, Big Brother controls information, more specifically, information about the past. It misinforms its citizens about current events, which is the constant war being fought overseas. Oceania is seemingly at war with one of the superpowers and allied with another. However, at a whim, Oceania then aligns itself with its former foe and declares war on its former ally, yet the records are made to show no change. And to aid in this flip flopping, Big Brother controls time. Why is it 1984? It technically isn't. In the story, we learn that the year 1984 is seemingly infinite. It's more of a symbolic date rather than a measurement of a specific time. But why would a government do that? Wouldn't it cause more confusion? Again, it's all about control. By controlling time, there is no past or memories, but also no future or ambitions. It's a world of the constant present. We are also introduced to four ministries within Oceania that, while different from the branches of government in the Western World, parallel contemporary powers that influence our lives today. The Ministry of Truth can represent the media, which provides news, information, and entertainment. The Ministry of Peace can represent the military. The Ministry of Plenty can represent businesses and corporations. And the Ministry of Love can represent culture conformity or societal pressure to accept certain paradigms. It's makes you wonder, "Is Big Brother watching us right now?" Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 45303 Minute Book Reports
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
02:21
This is a quick book summary and analysis of Hatchet by Gary Paulsen. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. New Minute Book Reports are posted every week. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a boy named Brian who is flying from New York to Canada to spend time with his father. However, during the flight, the pilot of the small aircraft dies of a heart attack and Brian is forced to land the plane. Fortunately, Brian survives the plane crash, but suffers several injuries. He builds a shelter and gathers supplies, but really doesn't know what he is doing. After his wounds heal, Brian begins to learn and adapt to his new environment. He starts to recognize what's edible and even starts a fire. Just when things begin to look good for Brian, bad luck strikes and he is attacked by a moose and a tornado wipes out his camp. In the aftermath of the tornado, however, the tail of his plane surfaces in the nearby lake. He swims to the plane and retrieves a survival pack. Among the supplies is an emergency transmitter. In the end, Brian is rescued and discovers a newfound respect for nature. Readers understand early on that Brian is very vulnerable in the wild. He is consistently slowed by his injuries and inability to do much for himself. A lot of what he thinks he knows about survival often comes from popular culture, like TV shows and movies. However, Brian begins to learn about his environment and matures his survival instinct. He first recognizes his disadvantage in nature when he begins collecting food and wood. He understands that he must gather enough food and wood not just for the present, but also for the future in case he ever were to get hurt or injured. And it's from this foresight and progressive thinking that Brian demonstrates his understanding of survival. One of the great realizations that Brian has in the wild is that everything in nature is constantly trying to eat. This realization pushes Brian to create innovative solutions to gather food, whether it be weapons for hunting or a fish farm. And as Brian begins to reinvent technology to harvest food around him, readers also recognize that his tastes change. At first, Brian is content with eating berries. Later, however, he craves fish, bird, and bigger game. The conclusion of the story includes two rescues for Brian. The first is his physical rescue from the wilderness, but the second rescue is from the bitterness and disdain towards his mother. After Brian discovers that his mother's affair led to his parents' divorce, he strongly holds it against her. However, through surviving life-threatening situations, Brian puts his family drama in perspective. He never forgets his mother's actions, but at least he can let go. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 42737 Minute Book Reports
The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman (Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
01:57
This is a summary and analysis of "The Yellow Wallpaper" by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a wife and a husband who rent a mansion off in the country. The husband is a doctor, while the wife is suffering from severe mental illness. The country air will do her some good. The husband tells the wife that all she needs is rest and that she will recover. She is kept in the attic of the mansion in a large room with yellow wallpaper. There are windows facing every direction, but all the windows are barred. While the husband works in the town, the wife grows crazier and crazier, looking in the wallpaper for eyes and movement. She thinks that she sees women behind the pattern of the wallpaper. On their last day at the house, the wife locks the door and refuses to leave. When the husband opens the door, the wife reveals that she doesn't want to go back behind the wallpaper, claiming that she is now one of the women behind the pattern. The husband faints and she symbolically steps over his body to freedom. This story is about the progression into craziness, but also freedom. The husband represents science and authority, which often dismiss notions of liberation and imagination. In fact, the husband often talks to the wife as if she is a little girl. As the story progresses, the wife and images she sees behind the wallpaper begin to merge together. She claims she sees figures moving around on the wallpaper, but that could have just been her shadow from the moonlight. Either way, it paves the way for her to eventually become a woman behind the yellow wallpaper. In terms of the use of yellow in this story, it works because of the range that the color can come to represent. Yellow is a lively color that we often use to symbolize life and energy. However, it can also be used, especially if faded, to represent criticism, harshness, and cowardice. As this story is from the late 1800s, it reveals a lot of what women at the time were going through. Women had not yet been given the right to vote, let alone make enough money to support themselves. Many of them felt trapped, as if behind wallpaper. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 37739 Minute Book Reports
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens (Book Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
01:46
This is a quick book summary of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Transcript: This is a story about a man named Ebenezer Scrooge who lives in London. He is a greedy and mean-spirited moneylender who despises Christmas. But because it’s Christmas Eve, he reluctantly gives his clerks, among them Bob Cratchit, the following day off. Just as Scrooge is about to enter his home for the evening, he sees the face of his old business partner, Marley, in the door knocker. This frightens him, but Scrooge shrugs it off and prepares for bed. Later that evening, Scrooge is visited by Marley’s ghost, who warns him that in order to avoid an afterlife of torment, Scrooge will be visited by three ghosts. Scrooge can hardly sleep and the first ghost arrives on time. The Ghost of Christmas Past takes him to special memories of his childhood and young adult years, where he becomes so absorbed with making money that his fiancee leaves him. Scrooge is then returned back to his room and is later visited by the second ghost, the Ghost of Christmas Present. This jolly ghost takes him to the streets of London and shows him how normal people celebrate Christmas, including Scrooge’s nephew, Fred, and his clerk, Bob Cratchit. The Cratchits, although poor, make the most of what they have and are held together by the love of Tiny Tim, a small boy with a crutch. This trip to the present seems to revitalize Scrooge’s outlook on Christmas. However, Scrooge is then visited by the third ghost, the Ghost of Christmas Future. This grim figure shows how others react to Scrooge’s eventual death and portrays the Cratchits in the aftermath of Tiny Tim’s death. Because of these signs, Scrooge vows to change and cherish Christmas. Scrooge is then returned to his bedroom and finds that it is Christmas morning. He buys a giant feast for the Cratchits and visits his nephew to celebrate Christmas. In the end, Scrooge becomes generous and loves Christmas. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. I Saw Three Ships by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://audionautix.com/
Views: 35010 Minute Book Reports
Holes by Louis Sachar (Book Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
02:54
This is a quick book summary of Holes by Louis Sachar. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. This is a story about a boy named Stanley Yelnats who is found guilty of stealing a pair of shoes and sent to Camp Green Lake, a detention camp for boys in Texas. Stanley’s family has had a string of bad luck since his great-great grandfather became cursed for not fulfilling his promise to carry an old woman named Madam Zeroni up a mountain before coming to America. The area of the camp used to be a thriving community, but after the rise of an outlaw named Kissin’ Kate Barlow, the lake dried up and the community disbanded. At the camp, Mr. Pendanski, a counselor, welcomes Stanley to his new living quarters, which he shares with some boys, each with unique nicknames - X-ray, Armpit, Zero, Magnet, Zigzag, and Squid. Stanley is instructed by a man named Mr. Sir that he must dig a five foot hole each day and that if he finds anything interesting, to turn it in for a reward. Stanley struggles with digging his hole, but eventually gets the hang of it, earning himself the nickname, Caveman. Stanley finds a golden metal tube and gives it to X-Ray, who turns it in and gets a day off from digging. The Warden appears and tells the boys to keep digging. However, they don’t find anything and in her anger, the Warden scratches Mr. Sir’s face with her nails that have rattlesnake venom nail polish. Stanley teaches Zero how to read in exchange for help digging his hole. However, the other boys become jealous that Stanley doesn't dig and Zigzag and Stanley get into a fight. The Warden tells Stanley that he can’t teach Zero how to read and that he must go back to digging his own hole. However, Zero runs away into the wilderness and the Warden orders that all of Zero’s records be destroyed. Stanley steals the water truck to go after Zero, but he drives it into a hole. Stanley runs into the wilderness to search for Zero with no water and supplies. Stanley finds an upturned boat in the middle of the dry lake bed and discovers that Zero is resting there and eating what he calls sploosh, which are actually preserved peaches. Stanley and Zero travel toward a distant mountain that looks like a fist. However, Zero begins to feel sick from eating the sploosh and Stanley is forced to carry him up the mountain. Nearly dead, they arrive at the top of the mountain and find water and onion plants. They stay on the mountain for a while, recovering and resting before deciding to return back to the camp. Because Stanley doesn’t know what to do, he decides to dig around the spot where he found the golden metal tube. They dig through the night and eventually find a treasure chest. The Warden arrives and demands that they give her the chest. However, the hole is swarmed with yellow-spotted lizards and so everyone stands back, although they can’t figure out why Stanley and Zero haven’t been bitten. Stanley’s attorney arrives the next day and tells Stanley that he is being released from the camp. The Warden continues to demand the chest, but Zero discovers that Stanley’s name is on the chest. Stanley’s attorney escorts Stanley and Zero away from the camp, which is shut down by the Attorney General. In the end, Stanley and Zero become rich from the contents of the chest, Stanley’s father invents a foot odor remedy, and Zero is reunited with his mother. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. Music: "Climbing Higher Up".
Views: 85425 Minute Book Reports
Candide by Voltaire (Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
04:04
This is a quick summary and analysis of Candide by Voltaire. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. New Minute Book Reports are posted every week. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about the adventures of a man named Candide who grows up in the German castle of Westphalia. He is sensible and bright, taking to the philosophy of Pangloss, a philosopher who believes that all things happen for good. Candide gets run out of Westphalia by the Baron after expressing a romantic interest the beautiful Cunegonde, the Baron's daughter. Still, Candide is determined to reunite with her some day. After joining the Bulgarian army, Candide again runs, but meets Pangloss, who is disfigured and sickly. Pangloss tells Candide that Westphalia was attacked and that everyone died. The two of them travel to Portugal with the aid of a friendly man, who dies in a terrible storm at sea. After surviving an earthquake, Candide and Pangloss are convicted and each sentenced: Candide to be whipped and shot, Pangloss to be hanged. Pangloss is hanged, but Candide is saved by an old woman, who heals his wounds. The old woman takes Candide to Cunegonde, who survived the attack on Westphalia, and explains how she is now the property of two other men. Candide slays the two men who own Cunegonde and he takes her and the old woman to the New World to escape persecution. As they are sailing, the old woman shares her own journey from princess to slave. When they arrive in the New World, the local governor sees Cunegonde and wants to marry her. But before Candide can protest, he sees a ship arrive whose intentions are to arrest him for the slayings. Candide leaves with a local guide, Cacambo, and they find refuge in a nearby settlement. There, Candide discovers that Cunegonde's brother is a commanding officer, having also survived the attack on Westphalia. However, the men fight and Candide stabs Cunegonde's brother before fleeing. Candide and Cacambo then find a city of gold, El Dorado. Although the city is full of riches, the people live in peace and harmony. Candide and Cacambo enjoy their time in the city, but decide to take some of the riches with them to buy back Cunegonde. However, on their trip back, they lose most of their gold-carrying sheep and are forced to leave the riches behind. Candide decides to split off from Cacambo, instructing him to take most of the gold, buy Cunegonde, and meet him in Venice. After his gold is stolen by a Dutch sea captain, Candide decides to travel to France with Martin, a philosophical man who believes the worst in mankind. In France, Candide and Martin run into Cacambo, who is now a slave to a former sultan. Cacambo tells them that Cunegonde is a slave in Constantinople and has grown ugly. Still, Candide is determined to see her. As they are sailing to Constantinople, the group discovers that Cunegonde's brother and Pangloss are rowing the boat. They land in Constantinople and Candide sees Cunegonde, ugly and beaten, and the old woman. He buys them, still wanting to marry Cunegonde. In the end, Candide buys a small Turkish farm with the rest of his money and they all live on the farm together. Initially, readers should be able to identify the author's use of satire as social commentary on money, relationships, slavery, and the evilness in people. Yet the strongest satire is saved for religious commentary. In the story, religious figures are often portrayed as hypocrites who display acts of lust, greed, and selfishness. This story also portrays the incomplete story. Often, readers are led to believe that characters have died, but in fact, those characters survive and return by the end. This demonstrates the survivability of humans as organisms, but also an exciting literary device: the limited narrator. What this does is limit the reader's knowledge of the world and create new surprises that the reader and main protagonist share together. Through all of Candide's misadventures, his belief that everything works for good acts as a strong constant. This philosophy, in a way, is mocked by the author as Candide takes it to extremes in some cases. This ultimately leads to the conclusion of the story where Candide realizes that, in the end, it doesn't really matter whether events, good or bad, work out. Ultimately, we, as humans, are meant to work and experience, not to think or judge whether our experiences are for the benefit of ourselves and those around us. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 85203 Minute Book Reports
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck (Book Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
05:57
This is a quick book summary of The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Transcript: This is a story about a man named Tom Joad, a ex-convict recently released from prison for killing a man with a shovel while being stabbed. While hitchhiking to his father’s cotton farm in Oklahoma, Tom meets Casy, his childhood preacher who has since left the church. When they arrive at the farm, they see that it is abandoned and the land has been worked over by a tractor. A man named Muley, a local man who knew Tom when he was younger, approaches and explains that most of the families in the area have been forced out by the banks and that Tom’s family has gone to live with his Uncle John. Tom and Casy walk to Uncle John’s farm and Tom is reunited with his father, mother, grandparents, and siblings. Over breakfast, Tom’s father explains that they were planning on moving to California. The family packs in the truck, which includes Grandpa, Grandma, Casy, Uncle John, Connie, Rose of Sharon, Al, Noah, Ruthie, Winfield, and Tom. They begin their journey on the road to California on Highway 66. As the family continues on their journey, they stop on the side of the road to rest and meet the Wilson’s, a husband and wife whose car has stopped working. Grandpa Joad feels sick and dies of a stroke. As they exit Oklahoma and enter Texas, the car breaks down and needs a new engine part. The rest of the family goes ahead in the truck and rests at a stop, while Tom and his brother, Al, look for a service station. They find a car parts dealer and the one-eyed man sells them the part they need for cheap. They return to the vehicle and fix it, eventually catching up to the family at the stop. However, at the stop, a man returning from California tells them that workers arriving in California are being taken advantage of because of their desperation. Still, the Joad and Wilson families continue on their journey. The family drives through Arizona and finally arrives in California, but they still must cross the desert. At a local encampment, Tom’s brother, Noah, decides to stay and the Wilson’s urge the Joad’s to continue without them because Mrs. Wilson is near death. With Grandma Joad nearly dead, the family packs up and makes the final push into California. However, Grandma Joad never sees the orchards and city lights of California, as she dies in the back of the truck. After burying Grandma Joad, the family settles in an encampment called Hooverville. The collection of tents is full of poor workers and their families, all of which are struggling to eat. Tom meets a man named Floyd who tells him that there is no work in the area and describes how the workers are being taken advantage of because of so few jobs. ... Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. What True Self, Feels Bogus, Let's Watch Jason X by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://chriszabriskie.com/reappear/ Artist: http://chriszabriskie.com/
Views: 50802 Minute Book Reports
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
03:27
This is a quick book summary and analysis of A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. New Minute Book Reports are posted every week. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a girl named Meg Murry who is struggling in her school life and home life. She is teased for her looks, but also because her family is different. Rumor has it that her father has ran off and that her youngest brother, Charles Wallace, is slow. Meg also lives with her mom, a scientist, and twin brothers, Sandy and Dennys. One day, Meg, Charles Wallace, and Calvin, a boy from school, explore a local haunted house. They are greeted by three women, Mrs. Whatsit, Mrs. Who, and Mrs. Which, each a little odder than the next. The three women seem to know about Mr. Murry and so the children follow them. However, as they are walking through the forest, something strange happens to them. They travel by tesseract, an advanced form of traveling through space and time, to a distant planet. At first, Meg is overwhelmed by the experience, but she grows to like the new planet, as its very beautiful. The children are told that Mr. Murry has been fighting The Black Thing, a large shadow-like being, and that they too must join the fight. The children agree and are taken to Camazotz, the home of IT, a dark and mysterious entity that craves control and power. After arriving in Camazotz, the children encounter a community that is centered around routine and schedule. Events happen at a certain time and there is general sameness amongst the people. The children eventually meet IT, which turns out to be a grotesque brain. IT mind-controls Charles Wallace, using him as its voice. Meg rescues her father from a glass prison and just as IT attempts to mind-control Calvin and Meg, Mr. Murry teleports them by tesseract to a distant planet. On this planet, the group encounters a tentacle creature named Aunt Beast. There, Meg gains the courage to face IT alone. Meg returns to Camazotz to get Charles Wallace back. She tries to fight IT with anger, but discovers that love is its greatest weakness. And in the end, after defeating IT, all of them return home where Meg's father is reunited with his family. First, this story enters an interesting genre within children's literature. Technically, it's primarily science fiction, dealing with time and space travel and beings from different planets. And yet, at the same time, it's about children dealing with issues that are relatable to a younger audience. One of these issues is maturity and the ability to identify the weaknesses within oneself. Each of the children is told their weakness, yet their weaknesses still manage to create problems. In fact, the reason Charles Wallace becomes mind-controlled by IT is because of his weakness, pride. Even Meg uses her weakness, anger, against IT, but fails. From this fight between Meg and IT, the story presents the conflict of love, or emotion, versus intellect. IT is literally a giant brain that shuns emotions and calculates and schedules the behavior of the Camazotz people to create a totalitarian society. Everyone is the same and, therefore, there are no worries because all of the decisions are already made for the people. Yet, Meg recognizes the emptiness of the situation. So while everything is taken care of from the perspective of the society as a whole, the people, as individuals, are not given the opportunity to celebrate the differences amongst themselves. And it's here that the message of the story is conveyed. All of the characters, whether from Earth or beyond, are unique and interesting. Their characteristics and personalities are celebrated, not scorned. And it's these differences that make life worth living. In fact, it's good to be different. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 45603 Minute Book Reports
A Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery O' Connor (Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
03:06
This is a quick summary and analysis of A Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery O'Connor. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. New Minute Book Reports are posted every week. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a family who is planning a road trip from Georgia to Florida. The grandmother, an old, talkative woman, really wants to go to Tennessee, but her son, Bailey, insists on Florida. Despite the grandmother's warnings of an escaped prisoner, The Misfit, Bailey, the grandmother, Bailey's wife, and three children, John Wesley, June Star, and a newborn, pack up and head out to Florida. As they are travelling, the grandmother mentions a nearby old house with treasure in it, which entices the family to investigate it and leave the road. However, when the grandmother realizes that the house she is thinking of is in Tennessee and not Georgia, she gets startled, causing Bailey to lose control of the car. The car tumbles off the back road and into a little ditch, but no one is hurt. As they assess the damage to the car, the family is approached by another car with three men. The men seem friendly, but are all carrying guns. Quickly, the grandmother recognizes one of the men as The Misfit. The Misfit instructs his two partners to take Bailey and John Wesley in the nearby woods and shoot them. Then he instructs them to take Bailey's wife with the newborn and June Star in the woods and shoot them as well. Meanwhile, the grandmother tells The Misfit that he's too good of a man to shoot an old lady. In the end, The Misfit shoots the grandmother. Through The Misfit, we see a person who has been worked by the prison system. His mind is murky and his thoughts, while interesting, leave the grandmother and readers questioning themselves about religious and philosophical ideals. But more importantly, the system has affected The Misfit to the point where he doesn't truly remember why he was incarcerated. Maybe time isn't the only thing that prisoners lose. Maybe to be truly institutionalized means that one experiences change, yet fails to understand why. One of the lingering questions at the end of the story is whether The Misfit is literally the grandmother's son or not. The author could have presented this scenario as more symbolic, but there are clues in the story that support this notion. Although not sure, The Misfit thinks that he was put in prison because he murdered his father, which does coincide with the absence of the grandmother's husband. At the end of the story, the grandmother also refers to The Misfit as her son. However, this could have been because he put on Bailey's blue shirt and she was beginning to panic. And while it is established that the grandmother recognizes Bailey as her only son, because the grandmother is very judgemental and old fashioned, she could have disowned The Misfit for his criminal past, which does technically leave her with only one son. As readers get to know the grandmother through prose and dialogue, she comes to represent a person who likes to live in the past. At the start of the story, she wants to go to Tennessee to see some old acquaintances. And while there is nothing wrong with that, she is so fixated with the past that the past is all she lives for. And it's from the grandmother that readers get the message of the story: Don't live in the past. Her comments about Blacks on the side of the road are derogatory and her conversation in the diner with the owner, while nostalgic, is an act of grasping for times that are no more. Time only moves forward and anyone who tries to live in the past is typically doomed. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 46748 Minute Book Reports
Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
02:17
This is a summary and quick analysis of Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a young man named Gregor Samsa who is a clerk at a local firm. He is the typical work-a-holic living with his parents, trying to work off the family debt. However, he wakes up one day to find that he is a human-sized beetle. At first he struggles to get out of bed and can hardly maneuver his body, as he's not used to moving with so many legs. When his parents see him as a beetle for the first time, they react pretty strongly, but his sister, Grete, is not so apprehensive. In the coming months, she cleans his room and feeds him. Grete decides to move the furniture out of Gregor's room so that he can climb around the walls. In doing so, the mother catches another glimpse of Gregor and faints. As time passes, Gregor realizes that without him working, the family is in deep financial trouble. The family brings in three renters into the apartment to bring in some extra money, but when Gregor is seen by the renters, they decide to not pay their rent and leave. It is then decided by the family that Gregor must leave. Gregor, upon hearing this, goes back to his room and dies. The family finds him dead and their life seems to turn around. They all get jobs and find a new place to live. And in the end, Gregor's parents recognize Grete, Gregor's sister, as a beautiful young woman. Initially, this is a story about the metamorphosis of Gregor - a transformation from a human to a beetle. However, what we really see is a metamorphosis of the family unit. In the beginning, we see a family who is strained under debt and apathetic towards this problem. And at the end, each member of the family begins to take initiatives to work and to change. This story is also about perspective, as we are mainly placed into the mind of Gregor. Although he is a beetle from the beginning of the story, the part of him that is still human characterizes and humanizes how we too might react in a similar situation. Throughout the story, Gregor hovers between insect and human. We see this in moments when he is considerate of his sister seeing him, covering himself with a bed sheet so as to not scare her with his appearance. And although people don't wake up as insects in real life, individuals do undergo forms of change. The beetle exterior can be a metaphor for depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, or even going away for college. One day, the world recognizes that you've changed. And you may not be a giant insect, but the world must now respond to the metamorphosized you. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 44825 Minute Book Reports
Wonder by R.J. Palacio (Book Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
02:26
This is a quick book summary of Wonder by R.J. Palacio. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. This is a story about a boy with a disfigured face named August Pullman who lives in New York with his father, mother, and sister, Via. Having been homeschooled for most of his childhood, August is surprised to hear from his parents that he is enrolled for fifth grade in a local prep school called Beecher Prep. At first, August is nervous about the school, but after a quick orientation with a group of students, he looks forward to entering school for the first time. August becomes friends with a boy named Jack and they have a lot of the same classes. August is also friends with a girl named Summer and they eat lunch together everyday. A popular boy named Julian teases August and spreads rumors about him to the rest of the school. Via enters a new high school, but is struggling to adjust as her old friends are branching off and she is forced to make a new group of friends. August is excited about Halloween because everyone can wear costumes and he can hide his face. However, when he gets to school, August overhears Jack talking to some boys about him in a bad way and leaves the classroom crying. Meanwhile, Summer is invited to a party with popular kids and asked why she hangs out with August. She leaves the party and continues her friendship with August at school. Jack can’t figure out why August stopped being his friend, but when he learns that August overheard his hurtful words, he’s sorry and wants to be friends again. Jack and August are paired up to be science fair project partners and when Julian wants to be Jack’s partner and Jack refuses, Jack punches Julian. Jack and August restore their friendship, but Julian excommunicates Jack, telling most of the boys to stop talking to him. Via starts dating Justin, a high school musician, who stands up for Jack against Julian and some bullies. After battling with an illness, Daisy, the family dog, dies. Via invites the family to her play, even though she is only an understudy, but when she fills for the lead, she does an amazing job. Over time, most of the boys stop siding with Julian and start saying hello to Jack and August. August’s class goes on a camping trip. August has a great time, except that one night, seventh graders from another school push him, but Jack and some other boys fight back and protect August. News of the fight makes it around school and people begin talking to August. August attends the Beecher Prep graduation ceremony and is awarded the Henry Ward Beecher medal for his strength throughout the school year and the impact he had on other students. In the end, August and his family celebrate and August thanks his mother for making him go to school. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. Music from Audioblocks.
Views: 44323 Minute Book Reports
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (Book Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
05:06
This is a quick book summary of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Transcript: This is a story about a girl named Scout Finch who lives in Maycomb, Alabama. She lives with her father, Atticus, older brother, Jem, and cook, Calpurnia. Scout plays in the neighborhood with Jem and their friend Dill, who lives in another town. Scout is smart for her age, as she can read pretty well. However, her teacher scolds her for having learned to read from her father. Scout lives near the Radley house, which is infamous in the community. Supposedly, a man named Boo Radley still lives there, but no one has seen him come out. The kids play near the house and try to get Boo to come out, but Atticus tells them to leave Boo alone. One morning it begins to snow in Maycomb, which is extremely rare. Jem and Scout build a snowman with the light snow in their yard. However, their neighbor’s house catches on fire and the entire town is out to help. During the commotion, Boo Radley puts a blanket around Scout’s shoulders, though she doesn’t realizes it until later. Because Atticus is a lawyer, he is assigned to represent Tom Robinson, a Black man, in a rape case. Word travels quickly and soon a boy at school teases Scout about it. Atticus warns Scout that she must not fight or get upset when people speak badly of him and that people will be speaking badly about him in the upcoming months because of the case. ... Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. Music: "She Dreams in Blue" by Josh Woodward at www.joshwoodward.com.
Views: 81354 Minute Book Reports
The Death Cure by James Dashner (Summary and Review) (Maze Runner Trilogy) - Minute Book Report
 
03:55
This is a quick summary and analysis of The Death Cure by James Dashner. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a boy named Thomas who survived a series of trials and tests by WICKED, an organization trying to find a cure for a deadly disease, the Flare, that has infected the planet. Thomas is kept in a padded cell by himself for a long time, but is then released and sees his friends, the Gladers. The group is given the option of having their memories restored by a man named Janson, the Rat Man who introduced them to their trials in the Scorch. Most of them are interested in the procedure, but Thomas, Minho, and Newt are against it. They also learn that most of them are immune to the Flare, but Newt is not. WICKED forces the three of them to have their memories restored, but before that can happen, Thomas leads an escape from the facility with Brenda and Jorge. They also discover that Teresa is leading an escape at the same time with the rest of the Gladers. Their destination is Denver, a city that is secure and has protected its citizens by quarantining the infected from the non-infected. The group arrives in Denver and uses fake names to get into the city. As they are walking around, they are given a note that instructs them to meet with Gally, Thomas' rival from the maze who killed Chuck, Thomas' best friend. Gally tells them that there is a resistance against WICKED called the Right Arm and that they are slowly trying to stop WICKED from future experiments. Thomas agrees to help them, but when the group returns to their ship, they discover that Newt is gone. They search for Newt at a Crank Palace, a place where those infected with the disease congregate. They find Newt at a bowling alley; however, he is starting to show signs of the Flare and tells them to leave. They return to Denver to find that things have gotten out of control. More and more of the Immunes, those who are immune from the Flare, are disappearing and the Cranks are getting out of hand. Thomas meets with the leader of the Right Arm, Vince, and it is discovered that WICKED is gathering up Immunes to run more trials for research purposes. Thomas and Vince come up with a plan to destroy WICKED from the inside. As the group is travelling, they encounter Newt. Newt tells Thomas that he wants to die and Thomas shoots him. Thomas returns to WICKED headquarters alone and learns that they want to dissect his brain for the cure for the Flare. Just as they are starting the operation, the Right Arm attacks the headquarters. While the Right Arm is fighting the WICKED guards, Thomas and a small group head back to the Maze to save the Immune population with the help of Chancellor Paige, the leader of WICKED. They organize the hundreds of people and try to escape. The maze begins to deteriorate due to explosions by the Right Arm. Several people die, but a lot of them escape as they try to find a Flat Trans, a portal that will take them somewhere safe. Thomas and his group are confronted by Janson and some guards, but Thomas and his group overcome them. However, Teresa dies. In the end, the survivors escape through a portal, arrive at a quiet place in the countryside, and must rebuild the human race again. As always a lot can be said about this story, but what draws my interest and attention is the idea of individual sacrifice for the common good of mankind. This is something that Thomas and his friends are constantly asked to do since they potentially hold the secret for the cure of the Flare. Thomas is put through a series of tests and Variables, which bring him to his extremes both physically and emotionally. And after he overcomes those challenges, he is promised that his sacrifices are for the good of mankind. But then he is put through more challenges and later told that it is also for the good of mankind. At some point, when is enough enough? When is it not worth sacrificing the lives of one individual, or a small group of individuals, for the greater good? Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music: "Memorized" by Josh Woodward - http://www.joshwoodward.com
Views: 45295 Minute Book Reports
Paul’s Case by Willa Cather (Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
01:42
This is a quick summary of Paul’s Case by Willa Cather. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Transcript: This is a story about a young man named Paul who attends a high school in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Paul is a rebellious student who is known for his lying and making teachers feel uncomfortable. Paul’s interests lies not in school, but in his part-time job as an usher at Carnegie Hall in New York. He enjoys assisting people and the atmosphere of class and music. He also finds time to enjoy the lifestyle of the rich by observing the nearby luxury hotels and spending time with a local actor. However, this feeling of bliss is accompanied by the realization that he lives in a humble neighborhood and that this rich lifestyle is so far from his grasp. Because Paul fails to cooperate at school, he is taken out of school and told that he cannot work as an usher. Instead, he is employed at a stock company. One day, as Paul is making a delivery of checks and banknotes at a bank, he pockets the money and writes a fake receipt for the delivery. He takes a train to New York and uses the money to check in to a fancy hotel and begins living the life of luxury he always dreamed of since he knows that the stock company will discover that he ran off with the money once the weekend is over. He goes out drinking, but also takes time to enjoy his hotel room and the sophistication of quiet time. When Monday arrives, the newspapers report that Paul’s father has paid for the stolen money and that the stock company is not pressing any charges. Paul then realizes that he must return to his home and live the rest of his life as a normal person. Saddened and depressed, Paul returns to Pennsylvania. In the end, Paul reflects on his life above a train track and when the train passes below, he jumps to his death. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. Music: "Where I am From" from the Youtube Audio Library.
Views: 11502 Minute Book Reports
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
02:51
This is a quick book summary and analysis of Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. New Minute Book Reports are posted every week. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a girl named Winnie who lives with her mother and grandmother in the town of Treegap. Her family is fairly wealthy, owning the nearby woods. However, Winnie is unhappy at home and decides to venture in the woods. She comes across a young man named Jesse Tuck, who claims to be over one hundred years old, but Winnie does not believe him. She asks to drink the water from a nearby spring, but Jesse insists that she not. Suddenly, Mae and Miles appear, Jesse's mother and brother. Mae, aware of Winnie's request to drink the water, decides to kidnap Winnie and take her to their home. However, as they are heading back home, a man in a yellow suit sees Winnie and follows them. At the Tuck's home, Winnie is greeted by Angus, Mae's husband. Collectively, the family tells Winnie that they are immortal because they drank from a magic spring in the woods. At first, Winnie doesn't believe them, but because they are so nice to her, she believes them. However, the man in the yellow suit hears their story and returns back to Treegap. The man with the yellow suit tells Winnie's family that he'll help them get Winnie back safely if they sign away their ownership to the woods. Winnie's family makes the deal and the man in the suit goes to retrieve Winnie. The man in the yellow suit confronts the Tuck's and explains that he will soon own the woods and the magical water. After hearing about the man's plan to sell the water, Mae hits the man with a gun. She is arrested and the man is rushed to a doctor. He eventually dies. Mae is held in the local jail and sentenced to be hanged. The Tuck's decide to break her out and Winnie wants to help. Jesse, who has grown to like Winnie, offers her a small vile of the magical spring water and tells her to drink it when she's seventeen so that they can live as young adults forever. The breakout is successful as Winnie pretends to be Mae in the jail cell while the family escapes. In the end, Angus and Mae return to Treetop many years later to find Winnie's tombstone, revealing that she never drank the magical spring water. This story centers around the concept of immortality and what it truly means to be immortal. Traditionally, society is enamored by the idea of living forever. There is an array of products that try to keep humans looking younger for longer. However, these are merely attempts to look immortal and are not true immortality. Looking at immortality more closely, readers can see that it is more of a curse than a gift. The Tuck's explain all of the downsides of being immortal, such as the loss of family and friends, constant moving, and others suspecting witchcraft. But perhaps the biggest detriment of immortality is the lack of a complete and circular life, as described in the many images of water throughout the story. As Angus explains to Winnie, water is always moving in a cycle. And it's this constant movement that gives it life. A life is made up of different phases and periods, and without the completeness of the death phase, life becomes stagnant and incomplete. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 23897 Minute Book Reports
Winter Dreams by F. Scott Fitzgerald (Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
01:32
This is a quick summary of Winter Dreams by F. Scott Fitzgerald. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Transcript: This is a story about a man named Dexter Green, who grows up as a son of a grocery store owner and lives in Minnesota. As a child, Dexter caddies at the local golf country club, carrying the golf clubs of the rich and prominent. After struggling to go to college on the east coast, Dexter returns to Minnesota and starts a successful laundry business. Soon, he meets Judy Jones, the daughter of a wealthy man. She enjoys golf and the company of men. Dexter and Judy spend time together, but Dexter soon realizes that Judy has about a dozen other men who she casually dates. This upsets him, but he still loves her. Over time, Dexter tries to forget about Judy as she continues to run around with different men. He meets a nice girl named Irene and they plan to get married. However, Judy sees Dexter at a dance club and she confesses that she wants to marry Dexter. Dexter breaks off the engagement with Irene and begins seeing Judy. However, Judy becomes bored with Dexter and leaves him. Dexter, upset and heartbroken, sells his laundry business and moves to New York City. After finding success in New York, he is visited by a businessman from Detroit whose friend is Judy’s husband. The businessman describes Judy as plain and tied down, which shocks Dexter. In the end, Dexter realizes that Judy, like some women, lost her charm and beauty with age and that his romantic view of her and his life back in Minnesota are gone. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. Music: "Everyday" from the Youtube Audio Library.
Views: 16967 Minute Book Reports
Divergent by Veronica Roth (Divergent Series) (Book Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
05:18
This is a quick book summary of Divergent by Veronica Roth. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Transcript: This is a story about a girl named Beatrice who lives with her father, mother, and brother, Caleb, in a future society that is divided into five major factions: Dauntless, Amity, Erudite, Abnegation, and Candor. Beatrice’s parents are Abnegation, however, because Beatrice and Caleb are sixteen years old, they must go through a test and pick what faction they want to be in. Those with no faction become Factionless. As Beatrice takes the faction test, she is put through a series of trials, which reveals that she is not drawn to one faction, but three. This is extremely rare and dangerous, which the society calls Divergent. Still, Beatrice must choose her faction. At the Choosing Ceremony, Caleb chooses Erudite and Beatrice chooses Dauntless, both choices that are against the norm. Beatrice is then led with the other Dauntless initiates and they must jump on a train to Dauntless headquarters. Once at the headquarters, a leader named Max tells them they must jump off a building. Beatrice is the first to jump and lands in the hidden net. As a Dauntless, her new identity and name is Tris. The Dauntless-born initiates are separated from the non-Dauntless born initiates for their training, ranking, and initiation. Four is Tris’ trainer and he first teaches them to shoot a gun. During the training, Tris becomes friends with her fellow trainees, including Al, Christina, and Will. She even gets a tattoo of birds in remembrance of her family. The group of initiates are then trained in hand to hand combat. Tris has to fight Peter, another initiate who is highly competitive, who dominates her in the fight. She eventually recovers from her injuries and continues the training. The initiates are taken to the fence, where Dauntless guards patrol. Four then has them play capture the flag with paintball guns. As Tris’ team is fighting about what to do, Tris and Four climb an old ferris wheel and spot the other team. Tris relays the message and their team wins. Visiting Day arrives where families, both Dauntless and not, visit the initiates. Most non-Dauntless family visit, but Tris’ mother arrives. They talk and Tris’ mother warns her to be careful. Tris also realizes that her mother was born as a Dauntless. ... Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. Music: "She Dreams in Blue" by Josh Woodward. www.joshwoodward.com
Views: 22220 Minute Book Reports
Dracula by Bram Stoker (Book Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
03:23
This is a quick book summary of Dracula by Bram Stoker. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Transcript: This is a story about a man named Jonathan Harker who travels to Transylvania from London to visit Count Dracula, a thin, old man, to inform him about real estate in England. Jonathan is treated well by Dracula, while Dracula is mostly absent at night. One night, Jonathan sees Dracula climb down the castle wall like a bat. Jonathan becomes afraid, and as he falls asleep, three vampire women appear and attack him. Dracula scares the women away, warning them not to touch Jonathan. Jonathan eventually discovers that Dracula is an evil vampire who sleeps during the day in a coffin. Eventually, Dracula prepares to travel to London and allows Jonathan to leave. Meanwhile, Mina, Jonathan’s fiancee, lives in England and spends time communicating with her best friend, Lucy. One night, Lucy goes missing and Mina finds her in a church with two bite marks on her neck. Dr. Seward, a doctor overlooking an insane asylum, observes a man named Renfield, a maniac who demonstrates unusual behavior, such as cultivating flies and spiders. Mina meets Jonathan from his trip home and sees that he is not in good condition. They get married quickly. Lucy becomes ill and is referred to Dr. Seward. Dr. Seward invites his mentor, Professor Van Helsing, to diagnose Lucy, who wants to continually be updated on her progress. Lucy’s health makes a turn for the worse and Van Helsing performs a blood transfusion. She recovers, but is then found very weak a couple of days later. Lucy and her mother are then found dead and Van Helsing and Dr. Seward investigate the cause. After Lucy is buried, Van Helsing and Dr. Seward meet up with Mina and Jonathan to get further insight into Lucy’s life. Van Helsing then suspects that Lucy is not dead, but the cause of recent attacks on children. Van Helsing and Dr. Seward investigate Lucy’s tomb at night and find that she is not there. However, the next morning, she is in her coffin and looks more lively than ever. Val Helsing wants to decapitate Lucy and drive a stake in her heart to finally release her into death and seeks the company of Arthur, Lucy’s fiance. They wait in the graveyard and encounter Lucy. After waiting until Lucy is resting in her coffin, Arthur drives a stake in her heart and they cut off her head. Val Helsing and the others, including an adventurer named Quincey, prepare to take on Dracula by compiling their notes and seeking out where Dracula displaced a series of wooden boxes containing dirt. The group breaks into Dracula’s house, but he is not there. Instead, Dracula visits Mina and bites her. Renfield asks Dr. Seward to let him go free from the asylum, but he’s refuses. Dracula attacks Renfield in his room, killing him. The group then finds Mina’s bedroom door locked and break in to find Dracula holding her. Dracula escapes, and Van Helsing realizes that if Dracula continues to live, Mina will slowly turn into a vampire. Their plan is to search out Dracula’s houses and sanctify each of his dirt-filled boxes. They succeed in sanctifying the dirt boxes, except one last missing box. They encounter Dracula in his house, but he escapes. Van Helsing hypnotizes Mina, which connects her mind to Dracula’s, and discovers that Dracula is resting on a ship heading back to Transylvania. The group packs their things to pursue Dracula. The box that contains Dracula is unloaded from the ship and escorted by Slovaks to the Castle of Dracula. Van Helsing and Mina travel separately from the group and encounter the three vampire women, killing the women in their tombs the following day, while Jonathan, Arthur, Dr. Seward, and Quincey chase the Slovaks. In the end, the group catches up to the box containing Dracula and kills him, Quincey dies, and Mina’s life is saved. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. For Originz by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100700 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 33409 Minute Book Reports
Call of the Wild by Jack London (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
02:47
This is a quick book summary and analysis of Call of the Wild by Jack London. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. New Minute Book Reports are posted every week. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a dog named Buck who lives on a beautiful estate in California, but is sold off as a sled dog. After being badly beaten by a dog trainer, Buck is used to pull mail in the Arctic. Although the work is tough, he learns quickly and soon takes over the sled team by killing the previous leader. The dog team is sold off to different sled drivers and nearly worked to death. They are in need of rest, but because of mismanagement, the strength of the dogs gets drained out of them until they are killed off one by one. Fortunately, Buck is saved by a man named John Thornton, a kind man with a heart for animals. John takes in Buck and helps him recover. Buck, having been mistreated by others in the past, is apprehensive at first, but then grows to love John. In fact, Buck pulls a 1,000 pound sled to win John a bet. John takes Buck and the rest of his dogs into the back country, searching for a mythical Lost Cabin. During this search, Buck wanders into the forest by himself and meets a wild wolf, which sparks a primal instinct within him. One night, after returning from the forest, Buck sees that John has been killed by a group of local Indians. In the end, with nowhere else to go, Buck integrates into the local wolf pack, becoming a part of local Indian mythology. First, this story discusses the relationship between domestic and primal instincts. Buck is introduced as a soft dog, living a luxurious life on the grounds of a mansion. But when he is taken and placed in the wild with other dogs, something within him changes. Yet, these changes are not foreign to him. It's like these instincts are already a part of him, just unearthed. And what makes this more relatable to readers, who don't necessary experience that call of the wild in our highly modernized society, is how these primal instincts may have more to do with morality than grunts and cavemen drawings. The story suggests that often to survive, moral nature must die. As Buck tries to assimilate to his new outdoor lifestyle, he is timid and almost polite, to the point where the other dogs eat his food. However, he soon learns to steal food to survive. In fact, he learns that it is easier to steal than not to steal. But why would readers enjoy a story about non-talking dogs? It's because of the applicability of the story to humans through the style of writing. As written, readers are placed in the head of dog, trying to understand the sled dog culture. And as the story goes on, readers discover how humanized Buck's personality is. Buck is relatable as a character. Any person who has worked in a job that they didn't necessarily want can understand the struggles Buck goes through in this story. It's a frustration derived by helplessness, anger, and fear, all human emotions, yet felt by a dog and projected to a level of relatability. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 34574 Minute Book Reports
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline (Book Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
04:55
This is a quick book summary of Ready Player One by Ernest Cline. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Transcript: This is a story about a young man named Wade, who lives in a futuristic Oklahoma City where the problems of the world are so bad that most of the population turns to an online simulation video game called the OASIS. The creator of the OASIS, a man named Halliday, dies and challenges the entire world to find a hidden Easter egg in his game in order to inherit his wealth by finding three keys and entering three gates through the OASIS universe. Wade lives in a trailer with his aunt and extended family, but keeps his most valuable belongings in a secret hiding place inside an abandoned junkyard. As a gunter, a nickname for anyone searching for the Easter egg, Wade enters the OASIS world as his avatar named Parzival. Wade hangs out in the OASIS world with a gunter named Aech, his friend who has helped him learn trivia about the 1980s to help find the Easter egg. Wade is awarded a Copper key after defeating a skeleton king at an old video game in a secret cave. As Wade is leaving the cave, he runs into a famous gunter named Art3mis. They talk and just as Wade leaves, she traps him temporarily and tells him that she knows he got the key because his name appeared on a worldwide scoreboard. Wade travels to a planet that looks like Halliday’s childhood town where he is placed in a virtual movie simulation and must act out the parts of the main character. Wade passes through the First Gate and his score increases on the scoreboard. Meanwhile, Art3mis finds the Copper Key. As Wade tries to find the Jade key, he receives a request to meet with Innovative Online Industries, a corporation trying to find the Easter egg with the help of hired avatars called Sixers, in hopes to take over the OASIS world. Wade meets with the chief of operations of IOI, a man named Sorrento, and refuses to offer help for money. Sorrento reveals that IOI knows his secret identity and threatens to kill him and his family. Wade refuses the final offer and a bomb destroys his aunt’s trailer, killing his family and neighbors. Wade spends all the money he has left to move to Columbus, the location of the OASIS headquarters. Wade calls a meeting with the other four gunters who are on the scoreboard - Art3mis, Aech, Daito, and Shoto - to warn them that IOI might go after them. Wade becomes romantically interested in Art3mis, but when he expresses his love for her, she backs away, wanting to spend more time finding the Easter egg. Wade grows depressed over the split with Art3mis until one day the scoreboard updates as Art3mis takes first place by finding the Jade Key. Wade thinks he knows where the Jade key is and flies to a planet filled with old arcade cabinets. He finds an unusual Pac Man machine and gets a high score, which rewards him with a mysterious quarter. However, the scoreboard updates again as Aech has found the Jade key, moving him to second place overall. Aech sends Wade a clue to help him and Wade finds the Jade Key. Daito is killed in the OASIS game and in real life by IOI agents. Soon, IOI Sixers swarm the planet for the Jade Key and their scores climb the scoreboard. However, as Wade thinks about finding the Second Gate, Sorrento’s score climbs to first place as he completes the Second Gate. Then Sorrento’s score rises again as he finds the Crystal Key, the last key. Wade completes the Second Gate and gets the Crystal Key. He then sends the information to Art3mis, Aech, and Shoto. However, IOI surrounds the planet where the Third Gate is so no one can get inside. In real life, Wade’s apartment is raided and he is arrested by IOI agents for not paying his bills. Wade is taken and processed as a tech specialist for IOI. Once inside IOI, he hacks into their system and retrieves all the information IOI has on Halliday and each of the top gunters. ... Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. Music: EDM Detection Mode by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1500026 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 24271 Minute Book Reports
The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey (The 5th Wave Series) (Book Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
02:57
This is a quick book summary of The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Transcript: This is a story about a girl named Cassie who lives in Ohio after an alien invasion kills most of the planet’s population. The aliens, or Others, had attacked in multiple waves - EMP bomb, tsunami wave, deadly virus, and human assassins - killing humans by the billions. There are also Others that look like humans. Cassie’s mother and father are dead, while her brother, Sammy, is taken away by the Others disguised as the military. Alone, Cassie believes she’s the only human alive, avoiding patrolling drones as best as she can. However, she gets shot in the leg by a sniper and barely escapes. A boy named Evan rescues Cassie from freezing to death and cares for her on his farm. Evan is romantically interested in Cassie, though she isn't at first. But as Cassie opens up about trying to rescue Sammy, Cassie and Evan grow close and kiss. Meanwhile, Sammy is taken to Camp Haven, a protected fort and training camp. The children are given tests to see who is an Other and who is human. Sammy passes the tests and gets an implant in the back of his neck, while the children who failed the tests are killed. Ben Parish, nicknamed Zombie and former high school crush of Cassie, is trained by Reznik, a mean drill instructor, and put in charge of a small squad of trainees at Camp Haven. Sammy, now nicknamed Nugget, joins Ben’s group and Ben looks out for him. They are assigned to train and dispose of the dead bodies. Ben is made sergeant and prepares for deployment. Ben leads his squad into battle against who they think are infested humans, but the squad is attacked by a sniper. Ben pulls out the tracker in his neck and discovers that the sniper is Reznik, their drill sergeant from camp. Ben realizes that the Others are actually training the children to kill the rest of the surviving humans. In essence, humans killing humans is the fifth wave. Wanting to rescue Sammy, Ben returns to the camp with a self-inflicted gunshot wound, leaving the rest of his squad behind. Cassie leaves Evan’s farm to find Sammy. However, Evan follows her and they are attacked by soldiers. Evan kills them, but is wounded. He then reveals that he is a Silencer - an Other who kills humans - and was the sniper who shot her in the leg earlier. He also explains that the Others injected themselves into humans years ago, only to be awakened during the invasion. Cassie is overwhelmed by all of the information she is learning from Evan, as Evan is both an Other and a human. She decides to infiltrate Camp Haven by herself. After entering Camp Haven, Cassie finds Sammy and leads him out. Ben also manages to meet up with Cassie and Sammy and the three of them attempt to escape. However, Commander Vosch, leader of the Other forces, is waiting for them and captures them. Just as Commander Vosch is about to kill Sammy, Evan enters from the vents and saves them. Cassie, Ben, and Sammy escape, while Evan stays behind to blow up the facility. The group is saved by Ben’s squad in a humvee and they drive off to safety as Camp Haven explodes. In the end, Cassie and Sammy enjoy the company of Ben and his squad. The 5th Wave Discussion Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmMjdEcpN6E Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute... Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. Clear Air - Somewhere Sunny by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-... Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 11905 Minute Book Reports
The Magician's Nephew by C.S. Lewis (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
03:18
This is a quick book summary and analysis of The Magician's Nephew by C.S. Lewis. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. New Minute Book Reports are posted every week. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a boy named Digory and a girl named Polly who are neighbors in London. Digory lives with his Uncle Andrew, a self-proclaimed magician, because his mother is very sick. Uncle Andrew shows the children some rings that contain magical powers. After touching one of the rings, Polly suddenly disappears. Digory grabs a ring and goes after her. Digory and Polly appear in a peaceful forest with several puddles. They discover that the puddles are doorways to other worlds and so they begin exploring. The children then find themselves in a crumbling world called Charn. After ringing a magical bell, the Queen, Jadis, awakens. They learn that Jadis is an evil witch, but as they try to leave the world, Jadis grabs them, travelling with them. Eventually, Jadis returns to London with the children and wants to rule the world. The children manage to transport Jadis back into another world, but bring along Uncle Andrew, a cabby, and a horse. At first, this new world is dark, but the group hears a song and suddenly life begins to appear. The source of the singing is a lion and as he nears them, Jadis panics and throws a lamppost at the lion. Seeing that the lion is not hurt, Jadis runs. The lion's name is Aslan and soon he creates other creatures in the world called Narnia. He designates some of the creatures as delegates, giving them the power of speech. Aslan acknowledges the children and requests that Digory travel over the hills to retrieve a magical apple. Digory travels with Polly and a flying horse. In the mountains, the apple trees are protected by a gate and Digory is the only one who ventures through. He picks an apple and is tempted to take a bite, but resists. There, Jadis, who has eaten an apple herself, continues to tempt him to eat it or at least give it to his dying mother. Confidently, Digory refuses. The group returns to Aslan and Digory plants the apple in the ground. A tree soon emerges with apples and Aslan explains that the tree will protect Narnia from Jadis. Digory is allowed to pick one apple for his mother. The cabby and his wife are made king and queen of Narnia and Digory, Polly, and Uncle Andrew return to London. Digory gives his mother the magic apple and she recovers. He buries the remains of the apple and the magic rings in a secret location. In the end, Digory inherits a mansion in the countryside and builds a wardrobe out of the apple tree that he had planted. Through Jadis and Aslan, readers see the contrast between magic and nature. Jadis, who is magically gifted from a non-Devine source, uses her powers for evil and the manner in which she uses her magic is aggressive and forceful. On the other hand, Aslan, who possesses magic from a Devine and almost mythical source, uses his powers for good, highlighted by a calm and majestic manner. In essence, evil magic, or self-proclaimed magic, is the exact opposite of natural magic. While there is Christian allegory throughout not just this story, but the entire Narnia series, there is a special focus on creationism and the Garden of Eden in this story. Both biblical events are portrayed in this story. Readers see that the world of Narnia is created through the spoken word, as is depicted in the Bible, as well as the garden scene with Digory being tempted to eat the apple. The author alludes to the destruction that humans can bring upon themselves, much like the world of Charn. Aslan warns Digory that humans are capable of producing the same destruction that came about because of the Deplorable Word. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 19700 Minute Book Reports
Hills Like White Elephants by Ernest Hemingway (Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
01:33
This is a quick summary and analysis of Hills like White Elephants by Ernest Hemingway. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a traveling couple who are at a train station in Spain. They are on their way to Madrid and stop to get a couple of drinks at the bar. The woman notes how beautiful the hills in the distance are, how they are like the color of white elephants. The man doesn't seem to be interested and continues to drink. The couple is on their way to get a procedure done and the man constantly asks the woman if she is okay with it. She assures him that she'll do it if he wants her to. After a few more drinks, the woman gets upset at the man and tells him to stop talking about it. The man carries their luggage to the train stop and when he returns to the bar, the woman has accepted that this procedure must be done. The procedure in question is an abortion. That's obvious. There are several hints and subtle references to that in the story. However, the focus of the story is the character change of the woman. At first she is hesitant about this, but is later accepting of it. Through subtle hints in the story, we know that the man and woman are not married. Their relationship is ambiguously defined, as they seem to travel together quite a bit. The man is identified as an American and the woman is identified as a girl, leaving her identity-less. So why are the hills like white elephants? The reference refers to a baby. The woman notes how beautiful the hills are, while the man hardly even notices. Their attitudes toward the hills reflect their attitude toward the unborn child. The woman sees the positive, while the man sees the negative. Because abortion isn't the taboo subject it once was, a lot of the power is lost in this story, which is both alarming and sad. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 17640 Minute Book Reports
A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner (Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
01:27
This is a quick summary of A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Transcript: This is a story about a woman named Emily Grierson who lives in a small town in the Southern United States. Because of Emily's father’s generosity, the mayor proclaims that she is forever exempt from paying city taxes upon her father’s death. However, as time goes on, Miss Emily’s father dies and the arrangement becomes challenged. Miss Emily quickly dismisses the challengers and continues to live in her house with her manservant. As Miss Emily is getting older, the townspeople begin to wonder if she will ever get married. A man named Homer Barron, a construction foreman from the North, comes to town for work and begins spending time with Miss Emily. The townspeople believe that they will get married, as Miss Emily has purchased several wedding items and decor. However, Homer is gay and leaves town. Three days later, Homer returns and enters the home of Miss Emily never to be seen again. Time passes and Miss Emily grows older. The townspeople continue to challenge her tax exemption, but she continues to ignore the challenge. Then, one day, Miss Emily dies. The townspeople hold a funeral service for her out of obligation. In the end, the townspeople discover a secret locked room in the house with the decaying body of Homer and see an indentation of a head on the pillow next to his body, indicating that Miss Emily had slept next to the dead body. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. Music: "Retreat" from the Youtube Audio Library.
Views: 28035 Minute Book Reports
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne (Summary and Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
02:24
This is a quick summary of The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Transcript: This is a story about a woman named Hester Prynne, a young woman who has committed adultery and has birthed an illegitimate child while living in Boston during the Puritan period. She is publicly shamed and forced to stand in public for all to see and must wear, as part of her punishment, a red letter “A” for the rest of her life. The townspeople question her as to the identity of the father of the child, but Hester does not give up the name. Hester and her baby, which she names Pearl, live in the forest away from town. As Pearl grows up to a toddler, Hester notices that she begins acting strange, like overly playful and imp-like. Meanwhile, a stranger named Roger Chillingworth arrives in Boston, a doctor and learned man. He reveals to Hester that he is, in fact, her husband, who was rumored to have died at sea. Chillingworth decides to stay in town for a while and gravitates toward Reverend Dimmesdale, a young clergyman who is suffering from an unknown illness. Chillingworth claims that Dimmesdale’s ailments are caused by spiritual conflicts. The stress for Dimmesdale is beginning to build and boil over as guilt overwhelms him. One night, he stands on the scaffold where Hester had stood alone in front of the townspeople, and screams aloud, confessing that he is Pearl’s father. Hester arrives with Pearl and the three of them hold hands and watch the stars. Suddenly, Chillingworth approaches and suspects that Dimmesdale is Pearl’s father. Hester talks with Chillingworth, pleading that he stop tormenting Dimmesdale. She wants to tell Dimmesdale who Chillingworth really is and so she meets Dimmesdale and tells him that Chillingworth is her husband. Hester talks Dimmesdale into leaving Boston with her and Pearl by boarding a ship and living far away. This plan seems to relieve Dimmesdale, as he experiences joy and happiness at this news. As Dimmesdale prepares for his last sermon, Hester makes arrangements on a ship for her, Pearl, and Dimmesdale. On the day of Dimmesdale’s last sermon, everyone is gathered in the marketplace. Hester discovers that Chillingworth is also a passenger on the ship and so she doesn’t know what to do. After Dimmesdale gives his sermon, he sees Hester and Pearl in the crowd and leads them to the scaffold to tell everyone their secret. And as he dies on the scaffold, Hester and Pearl comfort him. In the end, Hester and Pearl leave Boston, Pearl inherits Chillingworth’s wealth, and Hester returns to live the remaining days of her life in her old cabin. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. Music by Richard Jensen.
Views: 22588 Minute Book Reports
The War of the Worlds by H.G.Wells (Book Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
01:54
This is a quick book summary of The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells. War of the Worlds Reading Update Playlist Part 1-4 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OtHSxGdAWxw&list=PLXA2QkoSQ_SuBYX4k6ZLyqt8IE27aRAna This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. Music: "Morning with Coffee" from Audioblocks.
Views: 9488 Minute Book Reports
Everything That Rises Must Converge by Flannery O'Connor (Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
02:20
This is a quick summary and analysis of Everything that Rises Must Converge by Flannery O'Connor. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. New Minute Book Reports are posted every week. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a guy named Julian who is accompanying his mother to an evening exercise class. They live on the poor side of town even though they come from a family with old money. Julian is an aspiring writer who sells typewriters, having just graduated from college. They catch the bus, and his mother, an opinionated old woman, expresses her dislike and distrust of Blacks. As Julian is disgusted with his mother's prejudice, a Black woman and her young son enter the bus. Julian smiles as he sees that both the woman and his mother are wearing the same hat. Julian's mother takes kindly to the young boy and as they are both getting off the bus at the same stop, his mother offers the boy a penny. Insulted, the boy's mother gets upset and punches Julian's mother in the face. Embarrassed, his mother decides to skip the class and walk home. In the end, Julian's mother passes out on the sidewalk. The idea of identity is a big part of this story. Both Julian and his mother claim to know their own identity. Julian, for the most part, sees and knows who he is. He's a college graduate trying to make it in the world. However, his mother is self-delusional. The mother's identity is an identity from the past and this allows her to see the world as someone from a different time. And it's in this time that she sees herself that she views the world as a rich woman from old money who owns servants and lives an entitled life. But her reality is quite different. She is neither wealthy or privileged. They live in a poor neighborhood and catch the bus. It's from the mother's self-delusion that readers see her biggest flaw - the idea or need to feel unique and special. Her disdain of "meeting herself coming and going" drives her to be antagonistic towards others, especially those she feels she is better than. The purple hat is a symbol of this attitude in that it makes her feel better than other women. But what does this title mean? Does everything that rises converge? Ultimately, no matter how society categorizes or groups people, everyone is fundamentally the same. And it's this sameness that will create these opportunities for different groups to be on equal levels. So while this idea may infuriate some, it does give hope to those who are considered in low level social groups. Again, returning to the idea that we are all just human beings. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 12446 Minute Book Reports
The Open Boat by Stephen Crane (Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
01:10
This is a quick summary of The Open Boat by Stephen Crane. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Transcript: This is a story about a crew of men who are stranded on a small boat after their ship sinks. On board the boat is a hurt captain, an oiler named Billie, a correspondent, and a cook. Billie and the correspondent take turns rowing the boat to the captain’s orders. The captain spots a light in the distance, which is a lighthouse, and so they row towards the lighthouse. However, because the waves are strong, they can’t reach land and the captain decides to pull back into the open sea. After drifting for a while, they try again toward the island and see a crowd of people waving to them on land. They try to make it, but again, the waves are too much. The captain realizes that the boat will not be able to sustain them for much longer and so they try one more time to make it to shore. As they row toward the shore, the boat begins to sink and all of the crew jumps out. The captain hangs on to the boat, while the rest of the crew swims to shore. The correspondent is stuck in a bad current, but is then tossed by a wave and makes it ashore. He is greeted by a man who helps pull all of the crew from the water. In the end, all of the crew make it safely to the beach except for Billie, who drowns, and they bury his body. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. Music: End of Summer from the Youtube Audio Library.
Views: 22020 Minute Book Reports
The Martian by Andy Weir (Book Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
04:55
This is a quick book summary of The Martian by Andy Weir. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Transcript: This is a story about a man named Mark Watney, an astronaut who is left behind on a mission to Mars during a sandstorm. His spacesuit gets punctured with an antennae, but he survives and watches as the rest of the Ares 3 crew flies away. He moves into the Hab and begins making a plan for survival. As a botanist and mechanical engineer, Watney first cultivates the soil so that he can grow his own food supply, as he estimates that he’ll need to survive for at least four years before rescue. He mixes Martian soil with Earth soil and then plants potatoes. Watney succeeds in adding water to the atmosphere and to the soil, but then he realizes that the atmosphere is filling with hydrogen, which could explode if charged. He figures out a solution to burn away the extra hydrogen, but there is a small explosion. Fortunately, everything is intact and he is successful in stabilizing the air. Back on Earth, the world mourns the loss of Watney. However, after viewing a few satellite photos, NASA officials realize that Watney is still alive. The announcement is made to the world and NASA turns all of its resources to trying to get Watney back home safely. Watney figures that his best way to be rescued is to travel to the location of the Ares 4 mission to Mars. It’s far away so he begins running tests on how he will get there. He enhances one of the rovers with solar panels and a radioactive power supply. ... Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. Heliograph by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://chriszabriskie.com/divider/ Artist: http://chriszabriskie.com/
Views: 11792 Minute Book Reports
The Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe (Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
01:34
This is a summary and analysis of "The Cask of Amontillado" by Edgar Allen Poe. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about an Italian man who wants to kill another man named Fortunato. But he doesn't want to murder him with a sword or gun. Instead, he lets Fortunato, in a sense, kill himself. The man sees Fortunato, greets him, and tells him he has just bought some Amontillado, a good wine, but doesn't know if he got a good deal. Fortunato is a self-proclaimed wine expert and would love to verify if the wine is authentic. The man insists that Fortunato continue his day, but Fortunato insists that he will help. The two men venture to the wine in underground vaults. Fortunato is harboring a bad cough, but insists he can keep going. When they get to the vault with the Amontillado, the man restrains Fortunato to the wall with a chain and lock. Drunk, Fortunato remains still, while the man begins to wall him in with bricks. Slowly by slowly, the man builds the wall to shut Fortunato in. Fortunato begins to struggle, but the man keeps building up the wall. He throws in a torch before sealing Fortunato up for good. A lot of attention should go to discussing who the narrator, or killer, is. He is described very little in the text and so his identity is mysterious. However, one has to also ask who this man is sharing this story with. A friend? The police? A priest? Again, what makes this murder somewhat of an art is the fact that the narrator constantly insists that Fortunato return home while they are walking in the vaults, yet knows Fortunato so well that he knows Fortunato will not go back. He basically gives Fortunato the rope to hang himself. Brilliant. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 34580 Minute Book Reports
When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
02:49
This is a quick book summary and analysis of When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. New Minute Book Reports are posted every week. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a girl named Miranda who lives with her mother in New York City. Her mother works at a law firm and is preparing for the game show, $20,000 Pyramid, with boyfriend, Richard, and Miranda. Miranda is friends with a boy named Sal who lives in the same apartment building. One day, as they are walking home from school, a boy named Marcus punches Sal in the stomach and runs away. Sal limps home and becomes distant toward Miranda. Eventually Miranda makes new friends, Annemarie and Colin, and the three of them work at a local sandwich shop during lunch. She even begins talking to Marcus about time travel. Miranda starts receiving random notes that instruct her to write a letter. She is confused, but as she receives more letters, the letters begin predicting future events. One day, as Miranda sees Sal walking ahead of her, Marcus starts to run after Sal. Sal, being scared, runs from Marcus. However, as Sal is running, he doesn't see an oncoming truck. Just as he is about to get hit, a homeless man pushes Sal out of the way. The homeless man dies instantly. Sal is shaken up, but recovers. Miranda comforts Sal and they talk about how their friendship has changed. Miranda's mother goes to the game show and wins. During the show, Miranda realizes that the homeless man is Marcus from the future. In the end, Miranda finishes her letter and gives it to Marcus. This story addresses an interesting dynamic of friendship. When two people are such good friends that they rely solely on each other to provide companionship and have no other friends, it can become difficult to socially interact with others when the other person is not around. Sal realizes this and so he wants to make friends other than Miranda. While this story takes place in the real world and contains all of the real financial and social struggles that people face, it does also tease the idea of time travel. Early in the story, Marcus details the intricacies of time travel and lays the foundation for what will ultimately be the reveal of the homeless man's identity. And this reveal is not fast either. Future Marcus has to integrate into the society as a homeless man for a long time before he can save Sal's life. This disconnect from one's future self is also revealed in this discussion on time travel in that the present self often doesn't recognize the future self. Of course, this doesn't only apply to time travel, but to the more traditional linear timeline as well. People change several times over the course of their lifetime and it's important for readers to remember this. The likes and dislikes, attitudes, and beliefs that a person may have now will most likely change in the future, maybe to the point where our past self is unrecognizable to our present self. This doesn't mean it's useless to have likes and dislikes, but rather a reminder to keep our opinions in perspective and that it's okay for them to change. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 15603 Minute Book Reports
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
03:24
This is a quick book summary and analysis of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. It should be interesting to see how the summer 2013 movie will be different. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a man named Nick who is living in America in the 1920s. He moves to New York to become a bond trader and finds that he lives next to a large mansion occupied by a mysterious man named Gatsby. Gatsby has wild parties every night with lots of women and alcohol and when Nick is invited, he learns that Gatsby had also been in the army. However, no one really knows how Gatsby got rich. Nick reunites with his cousin, Daisy, a flirtatious young woman who is married to Tom, a rich businessman. However, Tom is having an affair with a mechanic's wife, Myrtle. Nick meets Daisy's friend, Jordan, a young professional golfer, and they form a romantic relationship. Meanwhile, Nick and Gatsby become friends and Gatsby shares how he inherited his wealth from a yacht owner. It's also revealed that Gatsby had known Daisy when they were younger and he is still in love with her. In fact, Gatsby secretly watches Daisy from across the lake, as Daisy lives there with Tom and her daughter. Gatsby and Daisy finally meet and a flood of emotions come back. They admit their love for each other. To escape the heat, they all drive into town. Tom finds out Daisy wants to leave him and gets upset, telling Daisy and Gatsby to drive back home where they will discuss it. However, Daisy, driving Gatsby's yellow car, runs over Myrtle by accident. Tom then tells the mechanic that it was Gatsby who ran over Myrtle. As Gatsby is swimming at home, the mechanic shows up and shoots him. Sadly, no one shows up to Gatsby's funeral and Nick, confused and saddened, sells everything and moves back to the Midwest. First of all, this story presents a historical snapshot of the 1920s, an interesting time in American history. We get the vividness of the time, with the lights and glamour that saturated the people. Drinking, parties, and sex were to be celebrated, not condemned. And it should be noted that to express this energy and culture through writing is a difficult task. It's simply not just saying that there were bright lights and cocktails, but emerging a reader in this world with subtle reminders of the culture. Identity is also an important theme, as characters, as with real people, have complex identities that often involve deceit. People are not who they say they are: Tom and Myrtle having an affair and the ambiguous history of Gatsby, as Gatsby's name isn't even his real name. And we, as readers, are reminded of this when his father shows up and corrects Nick, saying that his name was "James Gatz." There are several explanations given to us as to how Gatsby became wealthy. Readers learn early on how he had gained his wealth, but are still left wondering how that wealth had been maintained over the years. Ambiguous phone calls seem to be coming to the house, even after Gatsby's death, which hints at illegal gambling as a source of income for Gatsby. Nick makes an interesting observation about parties that could be still true today. That while they happen every weekend, there is a certain emptiness experienced at parties. This emptiness derives from how fake and replaceable people are. That if you attend enough parties, they all tend to be the same. Furthermore, Gatsby wishes he could go back to when he had first met Daisy. And any character that wishes the present were the past, that things were the way they used to be, is doomed. This is a strong literary device and several of the best stories incorporate in their tragic characters. So be forewarned, living in the past is dangerous. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 35329 Minute Book Reports
Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
03:24
This is a quick book summary and analysis of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a boy named Tom Sawyer, a rebellious boy who lives in St. Petersburg, America. He lives with his Aunt Polly, a strict woman who constantly worries about him. Tom is crafty and sly, tricking most of the boys in his town to paint his fence for him. His closest friend is Huck, another rebellious boy like himself. A new family moves into town, the Thatcher’s, and Tom is in love with their daughter, Becky. As Tom and Huck play in a graveyard with a dead cat, they overhear some men and witness a murder by Injun Joe, a violent man set on revenge. Tom and his friends pretend to be pirates on a nearby island, living out in the woods for a while. However, because they are gone for so long, the townspeople assume that the boys have drowned in the river. Tom and the boys eventually return. Tom wrestles on whether to tell anyone about Injun Joe, but he is then forced to testify in court and Injun Joe runs away. As the manhunt for Injun Joe continues, Tom and Huck decide to search for buried treasure. However, they come across a haunted house, which is Injun Joe’s hiding place. They overhear that he has buried the treasure in a secret location and try to follow him, but instead Huck stops the murder of a widow. Tom takes Becky on a trip to a nearby cave and they get lost. Things look bad, as they’ve run out of food, but Tom finds a way out and saves Becky. Tom then tells Huck that the treasure is in the cave and the two of them get it. They both become instantly wealthy. In the end, Huck struggles to the rich lifestyle, while Tom enjoys the money, but intends on being a classy thief. As always a lot can be said about this story, but what draws my interest and attention is the idea that money can’t always buy happiness. In today’s world, it’s often a matter of “If I only had more money, I’d be happy” but we don’t see that in the world of Tom Sawyer. In his world, the poor are often the most free. By the end of the story, the author provides two rowdy country boys with an enormous amount of wealth and they don’t know what to do with it. In fact, they struggle to adjust to life with money. All Huck wants to do is go outside whenever he wants and enjoy nature. He wants to fish, swim, and explore caves. He doesn’t care about the fancy clothes and gourmet food. In his simple ways, he recognizes all of the obligations that wealth brings with it, like manners, politics, and how possessions can begin to possess us. And so for him, wealth is bondage, not freedom. Even Tom pushes back against his wealth in a way. Instead of investing the money or buying nice things, Tom wants to start a gang of thieves. And while some may say that this shows his growing desire for more wealth, I think Tom wants to be a thief for the thrills and rebellion, not the accrued wealth. And so it’s kind of interesting that the two characters in the story that probably want or need the money the least end up the richest. But that’s a good thing. It shows that money doesn’t have to change people, especially for our protagonist, even if that protagonist is as rebellious and mischievous as Tom Sawyer. Music: "Shotdown" by Josh Woodward - http://www.joshwoodward.com
Views: 24693 Minute Book Reports
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
03:23
This is a quick book summary and analysis of Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a man named Siddhartha who wants to find enlightenment as a monk. He leaves his family and travels with his friend, Govinda, to learn from samanas, or wise monks, who are living in the forest. Over time, Siddhartha dislikes the teachings and teachers and wants to learn more on his own, so he leaves behind Govinda, who stays back to learn from Gautama, the Buddha. Siddhartha finds his way into a town and meets Kamala, a beautiful woman. He is attracted to her, but she wants a man who is wealthy. Because he knows nothing of business, Siddhartha seeks the help of a local merchant, who trains him. Soon, Siddhartha gains wealth and wins over Kamala. However, Siddhartha loses his passion to find enlightenment and indulges himself in gambling, possessions, and women. He realizes that he has strayed from his original path towards enlightenment and gives all of his possessions away, leaving Kamala behind with a son. Siddhartha encounters a ferryman named Vasudeva, who seems to have found peace and enlightenment on the river. Siddhartha stays with him and he learns to find inner peace. One day, Siddhartha encounters Kamala and her son, Siddhartha, near the river. Kamala gets bitten by a snake and dies, leaving the boy with Siddhartha to raise. However, the boy runs away and Siddhartha doesn’t know what to do. After Vasudeva leaves, Siddhartha stays as a ferryman and is visited by Govinda. In the end, Siddhartha has found enlightenment and shares a glimpse of it with Govinda. As always a lot can be said about this story, but what draws my interest and attention is the idea of the self needing to die to progress growth. And this has nothing to do with suicide, but rather a dying of character within ourselves, which then pushes us to change and become the person we are trying to become. Siddhartha realizes that in order for him to fully achieve enlightenment, he would need to forget the many lessons he learned as he started as a samanas. And as a way of unlearning those ways, he had to kill his former self and all of the ways of thinking that went with that self. This was accomplished when he became a merchant and discovered greed. Think of it this way. There’s a caterpillar and then a butterfly. In order for the caterpillar to become a butterfly, it has to kill the part of itself that is a caterpillar and becomes something different, something that is unrecognizable, which is the cocoon or pupa. And when the caterpillar ceases to be a caterpillar, it emerges and is now something totally different, a butterfly. And as a butterfly, it doesn’t think the same as the caterpillar. It is something completely new. And so in this same way, for a lot of us, we need our former selves to die in order to become something greater, or at least something different. For Siddhartha, it took him his entire life to realize this. That what he was chasing, which was enlightenment, could never be attained in the state that he was in. He could only attain it after he had experienced more of life and ultimately became a different person. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music: "Saturday" by Josh Woodward - http://www.joshwoodward.com
Views: 19509 Minute Book Reports
The Most Dangerous Game by Richard Connell (Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
03:19
This is a quick summary and analysis of The Most Dangerous Game by Richard Connell. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a man named Rainsford, an expert in hunting jaguar, who falls off a boat and is left on a deserted island in the Caribbean. Rainsford discovers that the island is not deserted, as a man named General Zaroff and his assistant, Ivan, live there in an elaborate mansion. Over dinner, Zaroff shares that he too likes to hunt, but has grown tired of hunting animals. Instead, he likes to hunt human with a revolver. Rainsford is appalled and wants to get off the island. Zaroff says that he will let Rainsford go free if he can survive three days on the island as his game. Rainsford is given food and a knife and heads out into the jungle. He tries to create loops and double backs, eventually hiding in a tree. However, Zaroff is too smart and finds Rainsford’s hiding spot, but without stopping the hunt, he lets Rainsford go for another day. Rainsford decides to build a trap with sharp sticks hidden in a pit. However, Zaroff is aware of the trap and it only claims his dog. On the third day, Zaroff releases his hounds and pursues Rainsford to the edge of the island. Ivan is killed by a knife trap and Rainsford is forced to jump into the ocean to escape the hounds. Disappointed, Zaroff returns home. In the end, as Zaroff is about to go to bed, Rainsford appears in his bedroom and kills him. As always, a lot can be said about this story, but what draws my interest and attention is the idea that humans are the only species that can use reason and it's this ability to reason that makes us the most dangerous game in the world. As Zaroff outlines to Rainsford and the reader how he came to hunting human, he reveals that it is the ability to reason that gives human beings the ultimate survival mind. We’re both selfish and creative, which allows us to come up with some interesting ideas and behaviors. Generally speaking, a hunter will hunt and the game will run and hide. The game will continue to run until it feels it is safe, but it never really reasons that it could probably turn around and fight back, unless, of course, it’s cornered. But the entire time, its instinct guides it to run away. It can never reason and critically evaluate the situation, changing it’s course to perhaps try a different strategy. Humans are capable of doing this and we see this through Rainsford during the hunt. On the first day of the hunt, Rainsford acts like game; he just runs and hides. However, by the second day, he is already on the offensive with a deadly trap. He reasons that his best chance of survival is not to run and hide, but to eliminate Zaroff. So how does this relate to us today? There are no Hunger Games or gladiator matches in existence, but we do see an arena where people can truly test their skill and minds against each other: online gaming. In the world of online gaming, specifically player versus player game modes, a human is matched up against another human. Usually there is one winner who, over the course of the match, outplays and out thinks the opponent. In the story, matching wits with another human gives Zaroff a psychological high, which may be why many video game players enjoy online player vs player games rather than against the preset computer. Music: "Tick Tock" by Josh Woodward - http://www.joshwoodward.com
Views: 23164 Minute Book Reports
Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
02:02
This is a quick book summary and analysis of Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about two friends, George and Lennie, who are on their way to a working farm. George is a small man with lots of big talk. In contrast, Lennie is a simple-minded large man who has a tendency to get in trouble. Both hope to one day own a farm where they can live off the land and Lennie can tend to the rabbits. They enter the farm which is run by Curley, a spoiled, mean boss who challenges George and Lennie immediately upon arrival. Curley is married to a promiscuous woman who is known to cause trouble. On numerous occasions, George warns Lennie to stay away from her. The working life for George and Lennie isn't too bad, as Lennie is a great field worker. Unfortunately, he accidentally kills Curley's wife. In a panic, Lennie flees. Curley sends his men, including George, to hunt down Lennie with a shoot-to-kill policy, as it is suspected that Lennie stole a gun. Lennie runs to a secret spot that George had designated for times of trouble and the two meet there. Lennie is scared and asks George to tell him about their future farm. While telling the story, George pulls out the stolen gun and shoots Lennie in the back of the head. After Lennie's death, the men return to the farm for drinks. The relationship between George and Lennie is complex, yet not so foreign. In contemporary movies and stories, we tend to see this type of relationship a lot - the best friend story. However, the difference here is that there is a tragic element to this relationship. It is still unclear why George stole the gun at the end of the story. One would like to think that he wanted to nobly be the one to kill his friend, but an argument could be made that he wanted to be free of responsibility of Lennie and to be able to live his own life. Taking a step back, this is really a story of misfit toys. Each character - George, Lennie, Curley, his wife, each worker - has been dealt a bad hand in life. And unlike the Christmas special where the misfit toys make it off the island, these misfits are condemned to be doomed. Music by WingoWinston from newgrounds.com.
Views: 53742 Minute Book Reports
Insurgent by Veronica Roth (Divergent Series) (Book Summary) - Minute Book Report
 
04:11
This is a quick book summary of Insurgent by Veronica Roth. This channel discusses and reviews books, novels, and short stories through drawing...poorly. Transcript: This is a story about a girl named Tris who lives in a society that is divided into different factions based on personality type and preference. Her faction, Dauntless, recently attacked her old faction, Abnegation, as the Dauntless soldiers were under the control of the Erudite through a brain simulation. Tris and those who managed to escape the attack arrive at Amity headquarters. She is joined by her brother, Caleb, and her trainer and romantic interest, Tobias, or Four. The Amity leaders decide that the group can only stay for a short time so Tris and her group try to fit in. Tris is hiding a hard drive that contains valuable information related to the attacks on the Abnegation by the Dauntless. However, Peter, a fellow runaway and Dauntless, tries to take it and Tris attacks him. Because it’s against Amity policy to fight, Tris is given a special serum that makes her relax and happy. The Erudite arrive and search the Amity buildings for Tris and her group. However, Tris and her group manage to escape by running into a field. They ride a train and encounter a group of factionless, who take them to their secret headquarters. There, they see that the factionless are more organized than previously thought and that Tobias' mother, Evelyn, is their leader, who Tris thought was dead. Evelyn wants Tobias to help them fight against the Erudite and Dauntless traitors, but Tobias doesn't know what to do and leaves for Candor headquarters to seek help. When Tobias and Tris arrive in Candor headquarters, they are arrested and given truth serum that reveals what happened with the Dauntless simulation. Under the serum, Tris reveals that she shot her friend, Will, in self-defense during the attack. Tris meets up with some of the other Dauntless, including some of her old friends. However, they are attacked by the Dauntless traitors, led by Eric, a Dauntless leader, but aren’t killed. Eric only wants to find people who are Divergent to take back to Jeanine. Tris is captured, but is rescued by her Dauntless friends. Jack Kang, leader of the Candor, decides to negotiate with Jeanine and the Erudite faction. Tris and a few of her friends sneak under the bridge while the negotiations are going on. However, Jeanine isn’t there, but is represented by a Dauntless leader named Max. The negotiations go bad and shooting ensues. Tris realizes that Jeanine is nearby and so she runs to a nearby building, but Jeanine escapes. ... Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 Paper by Fifty Three was used to make this video. Music by Richard Jensen.
Views: 9754 Minute Book Reports
We Were Liars by E. Lockhart (Book Summary and Review) - Minute Book Report
 
03:30
This is a quick book summary and analysis of We Were Liars by E. Lockhart. Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Minute-Book-Reports/1148331925195691 This is a story about a girl named Cadence who is a member of the Sinclair family, a rich and powerful family on the East Coast. Cadence spends every summer with her family, extended family, and grandparents on their private island. However, her family is somewhat broken, as her father left her and her mother, her two aunts are divorced, and her grandmother has since passed away. Although Cadence doesn't see her cousins throughout the year, when they return to the island each summer they seem to pick up right where they left off. She's particularly close with her cousins, Mirren and Johnny, and family friend, Gat, and calls the group "The Liars". She develops feelings for Gat on the island when she is fifteen, but then she suffers a head injury and can't remember much from that summer. Because of her head injury, she is allowed to return to the island two years later. When she arrives back on the island, things seem normal at first, but the Liars are acting isolated and her younger cousins, aunts, and grandfather are acting unusual. Because she is only allowed to spend half the summer on the island and the other half will be spent with her father in Colorado, Cadence tries to better understand what happened on the island two years earlier, but the Liars are reluctant to tell her, as they want her memories to come back to her naturally. Meanwhile, Cadence realizes that her mother and aunts are fighting over her grandfather's assets, pitting the grandchildren against each other. Cadence and Gat become closer and express how they feel for each other. She wants to start a relationship with him, but he is reluctant because of things in his past. Slowly, Cadence starts remembering things from the past and realizes what happened: two years earlier, the Liars set fire to the house. However, she lit the fire before the others could escape and they all died. In the end, after realizing that she killed the Liars, their spirits disappear. As always a lot can be said about this story, but what draws my interest and attention is the idea of "the family" and how our ideals of "the family" versus what the reality of "the family" is are pretty different. For a long time, society has iconicized "the family" as a husband, wife, and two kids. However, that's not always what we see, at least these days. In fact, it's quite uncommon to see that portrayal of "the family". Instead, we see single parent families, grandparents raising grandchildren, unmarried couples raising kids, and even same-sex couples raising children. The definition of "the family" is changing, and the Sinclair family demonstrates this change. All three Sinclair daughters have split from their spouses and struggle to make ends meet, relying almost solely on their trust funds to survive. Furthermore, a constant, contentious issue among the sisters is the money and inheritance that each will receive when their father passes away. In fact, the situation is ironic. The Sinclair family is so wealthy, yet so broken. This brokenness is also shown through Cadence's grandfather, the patriarch of the family. He is literally losing his mind, and readers should recognize that he's failed as a parent. Yes, he succeeded in the role of a provider, as his wealth has kept their family together all these years. But he ultimately fails to raise his daughters to take care of themselves. What did you think of the story? Let me know in the comments below. Don't forget to subscribe for more Minute Book Reports and thanks for watching. Through Minute Book Reports, hopefully you can get the plot and a few relevant discussion points in just a couple of minutes. Music: "Spirit World" by Josh Woodward - http://www.joshwoodward.com
Views: 6361 Minute Book Reports

Online classes vs traditional essay conclusion words
Relationship with friends and family essay samples
Why usc essay question
Bridge to terabithia leslies essay typer
Great gatsby valley of ashes essay typer